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Full text of "Town of Cohasset (Mass.) Annual Report"

COHASSET 




TOWN REPORT 



2004 



J , 1 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/townofcohassetnna2004sele 



ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
of the FINANCIAL AFFAIRS 

of the 

TOWN OF COHASSET 

Reports of the School Committee 

and the 
Reports of Other Town Officers 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 2004 



TOWN OF COHASSET 
incorporated 1770 

Population January 2003—7,537 



President of the United States 
George W. Bush 



Massachusetts Senators 
Edward IVI. Kennedy 
John F. Kerry 



Tenth Congressional District 
Representative William D. Delahunt 



Norfolk and Plymouth Senatorial District 
Senator Robert L. Hedlund 



Third Plymouth Representational District 
Representative Garrett Bradley 



Annual Town Meeting 
Date Set by Board of Selectmen 



Election of Officers 
Within 35 days of the Annual Town Meeting 



IN MEMORIAM 



Henry Ainsiie - March 25, 2004 
Selectman 
Water Commissioner 
Advisory Committee 

Louis N. Simeone - August 4, 2004 

Committee to Survey the Structure and Functions of Town Government 

Advisory Committee 

Lucille F. McLoughlin - December 1, 2004 

Library Trustee 

Lot E. Bates, Jr. - December 8, 2004 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Measurer of Wood and Bark 

Advisory Committee 

School Committee 

School Facilities Committee 

Fire Station Study Committee 

Historic Districts Study Committee 

Water Commissioner 



ELECTED OFFICIALS - TOWN OF COHASSET 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN - 3 YEAR TERM TERM EXPIRES 

Ralph S. Dormitzer 2007 

Frederick R. Koed 2005 

Roseanne M. McMorris 2005 

Robert B. Spofford 2007 

Michael H. Sullivan 2006 

MODERATOR - 3 YEAR TERM 

George L. Mariette III 2005 

TOWN CLERK - 3 YEAR TERM 

Marion L. Douglas 2005 

ASSESSOR - 3 YEAR TERM 

Elsa Miller 2007 

Mary Granville 2005 

Michael C. Patrolia 2006 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE - 3 YEAR TERM 

Richard P. Shea 2005 

Richard F. Flynn 2006 

Chartis L. Tebbetts 2006 

Adrienne MacCarthy 2007 

Jamie Williams 2007 

TRUSTEES PAUL PRATT MEMORIAL LIBRARY - 3 YEAR TERM 

Sheila Evans 2005 

Roger L. Lowe ^ 2005 

Rogers. Whitley 2005 

Agnes McCann 2006 

Patience G. Towie 2006 

Carol Riley 2006 

Sarah R. Pease 2007 

Barbara Power 2007 

Stacey V. Weaver 2007 



BOARD OF HEALTH - 3 YEAR TERM TERM EXPIRES 

Robin M. Lawrence 2005 

Margaret S. Chapman 2006 

Stephen N. Bobo 2007 

COHASSET HOUSING AUTHORITY - 5 YEAR TERM 

Christopher M. Allen 2005 

John Muncey 2006 

Ralph Peroncello 2007 

Helen C. Nothnagle (appointed by Governor) 2006 

Ann Ban-ett 2009 

PLANNING BOARD - 5 YEAR TERM 

Stuart W. Ivimey 2005 

Peter J. Pratt 2006 

Alfred S. Moore 2007 

Robert H. Sturdy 2008 

Michael R. Westcott 2009 

RECREATION COMMISSION - 5 YEAR TERM 

Wallace B. St. John 2005 

Lisa L. Lojacono 2006 

Lillian Mun-ay Curley 2007 

Mary K. Muncey 2007 

James Richardson 2007 

Richard Barrow 2008 

Anthony J. Carbone 2009 

BOARD OF SEWER COMMISSIONERS - 3 YEAR TERM 

Raymond Kasperowicz 2005 

John W. Beck 2006 

Sean Cunning 2007 

BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS - 3 YEAR TERM 

Glenn A. Pratt 2005 

John McNabb 2006 

Nathaniel Palmer 2007 



TOWN OFFICERS APPOINTED BY BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Town Manager/Chief Procurement Officer TERM EXPIRES 

William R Griffin 2008 
Town Counsel 

Paul R. DeRensis 2004 

TOWN OFFICERS APPOINTED BY TOWN MANAGER 
ADA Coordinator 

Robert M. Egan 2005 

Animal Control Officer 

Albert Currie 2005 

Assessor/Appraiser 

Mary E. Quill 2008 

Board of Health Agent 

Tara Tradd 2008 

Building Commissioner/Zoning Officer 

Robert M. Egan 2005 

Chief of Police 

James Hussey 

Sergeants of Police Under Civil Service 

David 0. Cogil 
Jon 0. Conte 
William P. Quigley 
Gregory J. Lennon 
Shellee Peters 



Patrolmen Under Civil Service TERM EXPIRES 

Lawrence D. Ainslie 
Michael Carini 
William English, Jr. 
Frederick H. Grassie 
Garrett A. Hunt 
Lisa M. Mates 
James P. McLean 
John H. Small 
Christy J. Tarantino 
Jeffrey R. Treanor 
Paul M. Wilson 
Francis P. Yannizzi 

Civilian Dispatch 

Patricia Douglas 
Sasha Geddes 
Christopher Grant 
John Hussey 
Patricia Lowery 
Thomas Wigmore 

Constable 

Maria A. Plante 2006 

Emergency Management Director 

Arthur H. Lehr 2006 

Assistant Emergency Management Director 

Glenn A. Pratt 2006 

Council on Elder Affairs Director 

Kathryn Bryanton 2006 

D.P.W. Superintendent 

Carl Sestito 2008 



Director of Finance/Town Accountant 



TERM EXPIRES 



J. Michael Buckley, Jr. 


2006 


Fence Viewers 




Kearin A. Dunn 


2005 


Glenn A. Pratt 


2005 


Fire Chief 




Roger W. Lincoln 


2007 


Fire Department Under Civil Service 




Randy Belanger 


Firefighter/Paramedic 


Paul T. Bilodeau 


Firefighter/EMT 


Richard Covino 


Firefighter/Paramedic 


James F. Curley 


Firefighter/EMT 


John J. Dockray 


Firefighter/Paramedic 


Thomas P. Finegan 


Firefighter/EMT 


James E. Fiori 


Firefighter 


James Lee Guny 


Captain/EMT 


John M. Hernan 


Firefighter/Paramedic 


Sharon Leone 


Firefighter/Paramedic 


Frances X. Mahoney, Jr. 


Firefighter/EMT 


Matthew B. Marr 


Firefighter/EMT 


Laura 0. Morrison 


Firefighter/Paramedic 


Robert F. Protulis 


Firefighter/EMT 


Randall W. Rosano 


Firefighter 


James P. Runey 


Captain 


Robert D. Silvia 


Captain/EMT 


Daniel Smith 


Firefighter/Paramedic 


Peter Starvaggi 


Firefighter/Paramedic 


Mark H. Trask 


Captain 


Eric Wenzlow 


Firefighter/EMT 


Leigh Young 


Firefighter/Paramedic 



Forest Warden 



Roger Lincoln 



2005 



Harbor Master 

John D. Muncey 

Assistant Harbor Masters 

Robert D. Baggs 
Clifford J. Dickson 
Lorren S. Gibbons 
Robert A. Johnson 
William Kelly 
Christy J. Tarantino 

Keeper of the Town Clock 

Noel A. Ripley 

Keeper of the Lockup 

John C. Conte 

Library Director 

Jacqueline Rafferty 

Plumbing and Gas Inspector 

William Higgins 

Recreation Director 

John M. Worley 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Robert M. Egan 

Shellfish Constables 

Clifford Dickson 
John D. Muncey 

Shellfish Deputy 

Rocco R. Laugelle 
Robert D. Baggs 

Town Archivist 



TERM EXPIRES 

2005 



2004 
2004 
2004 
2004 
2004 
2004 



2004 



2005 



2006 



2004 



2005 



2005 



2005 
2005 



2005 
2005 



David H. Wadsworth 



2005 



Town Planner TERM EXPIRES 

Elizabeth Harrington 2005 

Treasurer/Collector 

Joseph A. Divito, Jr. 2005 

Director of Veteran Services 

Noel A. Ripley 2004 

BOARDS, COMMITTEES, COMMISSIONS, AND REPRESENTATIVES APPOINTED BY THE 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Advisory Board on County Expenditures 

Merle 8. Brown 2004 

Cohasset Cultural Council 

Suzanne S. Terry 2004 

David T. Lehr 2004 

Celine Eymer 2004 

Douglas Eymer 2004 

Laurel Martinez 2005 

Mary A. Foley 2005 

Diane M. Kennedy 2005 

Shirley T. Tewksbury 2005 

Klaus P. Gensheimer 2006 

D. Alex Adkins 2006 

Betts H. Murray 2006 
One (1) Vacancy 

Civilian Dispatch Committee 

James Hussey - Chief of Police 

J. Michael Buckley, Jr. - Acting Town Manager 

Roger W. Lincoln - Fire Chief 

Thomas Wigmore - Dispatch Supervisor 

Cohasset Common Historic District Committee 

John Hovorka (Historical Society) 2004 

Thomas F. Van Aarle (Architect) 2004 

Charles Furtado (District Resident) 2005 

Gail Parks (District Resident) 2006 

Mary Jane Larson (District Resident) 2006 

Janice Crowley (Licensed Realtor) 2006 
William Hurley (Resident Alternate) 

10 



Peter Wood (Non-Resident Alternate) 

Community Preservation Committee TERM EXPIRES 

James G. Dedes (Conservation Commission) 2007 

Deborah S. Cool< (Open Space Committee) 2007 

Roseanne M. McMorris (Selectmen) 2007 

Stuart Ivimy (Resident) 2005 

Margaret R. Charles (Resident) 2005 

Jeffrey Waal (Resident) 2005 

Alfred S. Moore (Planning Board) 2006 

Helen Nothnagle (Housing Authority) 2006 

Paula Morse (Historical Commission) 2006 

Conservation Commission 

Veneta Roebuck 2004 

Edward Graham 2004 

Virginia Brophy 2004 

Jeffrey Waal 2005 

Deborah S. Cook 2005 

James G. Dedes 2006 
Vacancy 

Commission on Disabilities 

Lance Nom's 2006 
Four (4) Vacancies 

Council on Elder Affairs 

Barbara Elliot 2005 

Anna A. Abbruzzese 2007 

Nancy Ban-ett 2007 

Susan S. Galligan 2007 

James F. Keamey 2007 

Edward T. Mulvey 2007 

Dolores A. Roy 2007 

Jean J. Thompson 2007 

Government Island Advisory Committee 

Constance M. Afshar 2006 

Noel A. Ripley 2006 

Hamilton T. Tewksbury 2007 

Richard P. Barrow 2007 
John D. Muncey, Harbor Master 



11 



Growth and Development Task Force TERM EXPIRES 

Clark H. Brewer 
Richard W. Swanborg 
Michael R. Westcott 

Harbor Committee 

Peter Wood 2007 

Scott A. Herzog 2005 

Robert Cunningham 2005 

Mary K. Muncey 2005 

Loren S. Gibbons 2006 

Gail Parks 2006 

John Bertolami 2006 

F. Wisner Murray 2007 

Historical Commission 

Noel A. Ripley 2004 

Hamilton T. Tewksbury 2004 

Paula Morse 2004 

Mark St. Onge 2005 

Nathaniel Palmer 2005 

Marilyn Morrison 2006 

Rebecca Bates-McArthur 2006 

MBTA Representative 

Louis E. Eaton 2004 



Metropolitan Area Planning Council 

William Griffin 

Open Space Committee 

Deborah S. Cook 
Sandra Durant 
Keith Moskow 
Karen Quigley 
Vacancy 

Recycling Committee 

John K. McNabb, Jr. 
Merle S. Brown 
F. Allen MacDonald 
Sharyn K. Studley 
Jean White 

12 



Registrar of Voters TERM EXPIRES 

Marion L. Douglas, Town Clerk 

Judith Volungis 2007 

Edythe Ford 2005 

Margaret R. Charles 2006 

Senior Housing Committee 

Joseph R. Nedrow 

Nancy Barrett 2005 

Margaret R. Charles 2005 

Freda A. Zotos 2006 

Edward T. Mulvey 2006 

Roseanne McMorris 2005 

Wayne Sawchuck N/A 

South Shore Recycling Cooperative 

John K. McNabb, Jr. 
Merle S. Brown 

South Shore Regional School District Representative 

David M. Kneeland 2004 

Town History Committee 



Margot Cheel, 14 Margin Court 2007 

Harold E. Coughlin, 25 Reservoir Road 2006 

Jacqueline M. Dormitzer, 334 South Main Street 2007 

Louis R. Eaton, Jr., 30 Beach Street 2006 

Julia H. Gleason, 44 Stockbridge Street 2006 

James W. Hamilton, 298 King Street 2006 

Louis S. Harvey, 465 King Street 2006 

Ann Pompeo, 1 30 Forest Ave. 2007 

Hubert P. Vanderlugt, 144 Wheelwright Farm 2007 

Ernest Grassey, 20 Ledge Way 2005 

Molly Pierson, 1 23 Atlantic Ave. 2005 

Wigmore Pierson, 123 Atlantic Ave. 2005 



Water Resources Protection Committee 

John K. McNabb, Jr. 
James C. Kinch 
Stephen N. Bobo 
John Chapman 
Three (3) Vacancies 



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Youth Resources Committee TERM EXPIRES 

John M. Worley 
Michael McMillen 
Matthew Ogrodnik 
Elizabeth Bates 
Anthony Carbone 
Stephen Etkind 
Jody Butman 

Zoning Board of Appeals 

Barbara M. Power 2004 

Jane O. Goedecke 2004 

S. Woodworth Chittick 2005 

J. Anson Whealler 2005 

Benjamin H. Lacy 2006 

Charles Higginson 2006 



BOARDS, COMMITTEES, COMMISSIONS AND REPRESENTATIVES APPOINTED BY 
AUTHORITIES OTHER THAN THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Advisory Committee 

Bernadette Faulkner 2005 

Susan Kent 2005 

Roger Q. Hill 2006 

Vivian Bobo 2006 

Donna McGee 2006 

Thomas J. Glavin 2007 

Patrick Waters 2007 

Bylaw Committee 

Vacancy 2004 

Jacqueline M. Dormitzer 2005 

Louis R. Eaton 2006 
Marion L. Douglas, Town Clerk 
Paul R. DeRensis, Town Counsel 

Capital Budget Committee 

Samuel C. Pease 2004 

Steve Gaumer 2004 

Michael Fechter 2005 

Mark A. Baker 2006 

David Bergers 2006 



14 



Design Review Board TERM EXPIRES 

Robert Stansell 2004 

Maxwell R. Pounder 2004 

Josiah Stevenson 2005 

Robert C. Hunter 2005 

Vacancy 2006 
Robert M. Egan, Building Commissioner 

Committee to Survey the Structure and Functions of Town Government 

Nine (9) Vacancies 

School Building and Facilities Committee 

Kathleen E. Guinee (Appointed by Moderator) 2004 

Robert Spofford (Appointed by School Committee) 2004 

Scott Collins (Appointed by School Committee) 2004 

David Chase (Appointed by Board of Selectmen) 2005 

Denise K. Pari<er (Appointed by Board of Selectmen) 2005 

Adrienne MacCarthy (appointed by Moderator) 2005 

Donna O'Donnell (Appointed by Moderator) 2006 

Joanne Chittick (Appointed by School Committee) 2006 

Patricia Chase (Appointed by Board of Selectmen) 2006 



15 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

The following elections and town meetings were held: 

Presidential Primary, March 2, 2004 
Annual Town Meeting, March 27, 2004 
Annual Town Election, April 3, 2004 
Special Town Meeting, November 17, 2003 
State Primary, September 14, 2004 
State Election, November 2, 2004 
Special Town Meeting, December 6, 2004 

The Annual Listing of Persons seventeen years of age and older as per General Laws, Chapter 
51 , Section 4 was conducted by mail during January. Any citizen of the United States who is a 
Massachusetts resident and who will be eighteen years old on or before a town meeting or 
Election Day may register to vote. There is no waiting period to be eligible to register to vote. If 
you move, you may register to vote as soon as you move into your new home. Registration is 
closed for a brief period before town meetings and elections to allow election officials time to 
prepare the voting lists. If you register during a "closed" period, you will be eligible to vote only in 
later town meetings or elections. You must be registered twenty days before all primaries and 
elections, and ten days before a special town meeting. Currently there are a total of 5,336 active 
voters. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Margaret Charies, Chairwoman 
Marion Douglas, Clerk 
Edythe Ford 
Judith P. Volungis 



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REPORT OF THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



JANUARY 

With a tentative budget of $927,000, plans for the downtown streetscape redesign are being 

finalized after Town Meeting vote to keep utility wires above ground. 

Town Manager Mark Haddad will conduct disciplinary hearings for Sgt. William Quigley and 

Officer James McLean. 

The Planning Board gave Cedarmere conditional approval to move forward with development 

plans for a senior housing project. 

FEBRUARY 

The Board of Selectmen will not send on an application for the affordable portion of the 

Cedarmere development. It feels plans are incomplete regarding an on-site wastewater treatment 

system or permission to tie-in to the town's municipal sewer system. 

Lobster boats that had been locked in ice for more than a month were freed when the State Police 

sent an old Coast Guard boat to help break up the ice. 

The School Board made Its case for a $400,000 override to the Board of Selectmen and the 

Advisory Committee. 

Five developers submitted acceptable Requests for Proposals for the Cook Estate proposed 

senior housing community. 

MARCH 

Selectmen agree to place a $400,000 override for the schools on the Town Meeting Warrant. 
The Board of Selectmen vote unanimously in favor of allowing the Northland Residential 
Corporation to build its proposed senior housing project on the Cook Estate property. 

APRIL 

Voters approve the 2005 operating budget of $29,378,494 that includes a $400,000 Prop 2-1/2 

override. 

A task force of Cohasset professionals and merchants formed to discuss alternatives to current 

streetscape plans will review current plans for the Village Revitalization Project, drawn by the 

Waterfield Design Group. 

Northland Residential was denied access to town sewer, and with potential leaching field 

problems behind the Paul Pratt Memorial Library, the town may be running out of options 

regarding wastewater disposal for the proposed Cook site multi-unit senior housing. 

A Superior Court judge denied a local developer's request for an injunction that would have 

stopped sewer connections for developments moving fonA/ard. It would not have stopped Little 

Harbor's planned connection and the judge said the decision left the door open for Cedarmere to 

seek an injunction again should other developers be granted access to the sewer. 

MAY 

Mark Haddad resigned his position as Town Manager. 

17 



A new downtown revitalization review committee will be appointed to review plans already drafted 
by a design group hired by the town. 

JUNE 

Police Chief Robert Jackson announced his retirement. 
Former Boston Police Chief James Hussey took over as Acting Police Chief. 
Acting Town Manager Michael Buckley said the police controversy costs to date are 
approximately $1 21 ,000. 

JULY 

Sgt. William Quigley and Officer James McLean will return to work July 4 weekend. 

A nine-member Town Manager Act Review Committee, appointed by selectmen, has been 

charged with reviewing the seven-year-old legislation. 

Chief James Hussey is seeking input from residents and businesses and will form a Citizens 

Police Advisory Council. 

The Downtown Revitalization Committee made the decision that asphalt would be a more suitable 

sidewalk material than concrete. 

AUGUST 

The Zoning Board of Appeals and the Board of Selectmen warmly received initial improvement 

plans to the Cohasset Sailing Club. 

The Waterfield Design Group will make their final set of changes to plans for the downtown area, 

pending resolution of the unsettled sidewalk conversion issue. 

Selectmen appointed an 1 1 -member search committee for a Town Manager. 

The Town Manager Act Review Committee found there is little to change in the act itself, but there 

is much the selectmen could do to ensure a balance of power at Town Hall. 

The state Department of Environment Protection told the town to replace a sand dune that had 

been removed from the parking lot at Sandy Beach. 

Community Coordinator Tom Carroll announced an outreach program regarding the Greenbush 

construction. 

SEPTEMBER 

The Sewer Commission announced that capacity was found to tie-in 23 vacant lots to the central 
sewer district. 



18 



OCTOBER 

The only company to submit a bid for the downtown streetscape project submitted a proposal that 

wasn't viable. 

A petition intended to make possible the recall of elected officials was signed by more than 100 

residents. 

Tax Collector/Treasurer Joe DiVito has been appointed temporary liaison between the town and 

the IVIBTA regarding Greenbush line construction. 

An article for the Special Town Meeting would create a Cook Sewer District was sponsored by the 

Senior Housing Committee and Council on Elder Affairs. It would allow the senior housing project 

to connect if capacity exists. 

More than 100 residents including Members of Citizens for Equitable Environmental Solutions 

signed a petition to ask Town Meeting to formalize its commitment to the Little Harbor/Atlantic 

Avenue sewer expansion project. 

NOVEMBER 

Jacqueline Dormitzer and the Committee on Town History are compiling a new hardcover book 

titled "A Treasury of Cohasset History." 

Developers presented plans to build 14 single-family homes off Beechwood Street, adjacent to the 

proposed senior housing site. 

William Griffin was unanimously chosen by the Board of Selectmen as Town Manager. 

DECEMBER 

An article to authorize the expansion of the Central Sewer District to include the Cook property 

has been put on hold. 

The citizen's petition regarding recall of elected officials was voted down at Town Meeting. 

$600,000 was appropnated at Town Meeting for the renovation of the decaying seawall on Border 

Street by the Atlantica restaurant and the Mill River Mahne boatyard. 

The School Department signed a 3-year contract with Notification Technologies, Inc. to send a 

prerecorded message to every parent of a child in the Cohasset school system within minutes of 

any emergency situation. 



19 



ANNUAL REPORT OF TOWN COUNSEL 

This year was a very active and successful year for \he Law Department: 

1. Advice & Legal Documents . Numerous advisory opinions were rendered throughout 
the year to various town officials and boards relating to a wide variety of issues and subjects. 
Frequent and ongoing attention was given to reviewing and/or drafting bylaws, numerous contract 
documents and agreements, Town Manager transition issues, easements, procurement 
documents, public road documents, warrants for town meetings (both special and annual town 
meetings), compliance with the State Ethics Act, public records requests, various town rules and 
regulations, proposed legislation of benefit to the Town, and other legal documents. 

2. Administrative Agency Proceedings . The Town was involved with a number of state 
or federal administrative agencies, including issues before the Appellate Tax Board, Department 
of Environmental Protection, Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission, Army Corps of Engineers, 
and the Norfolk County District Attorney. 

3. Projects . We assisted with issues related to the Community Preservation Act, 
various private road issues. North Cohasset sewer project issues, the Avalon and Cedarmere 
projects. Central Cohasset sewer project issues, licensing issues, the MBTA Greenbush line, 40B 
Comprehensive Permit issues, James Lane issues. Mill River Boatyard and Great Neck matters, 
the acquisition of the Barnes Wildlife Refuge, sale of the Pratt Library building, and the Jacob's 
Meadow tidal flood gates project. 

4. Labor Issues . We assisted the Town in general employee matters and in connection 
with employee grievances, labor arbitrations and retirement issues. We also provided advice from 
time to time during the year regarding the interpretation and application of collective bargaining 
agreements and the processing of grievances. In addition, several non-union personnel issues, 
including possible disciplinary proceedings, occurred during this year. 

5. Litigation . As of December 31 , 2004, the number of claims and lawsuits in which the 
Town is a party total 39 as follows: 

1 Matter involving the Town iVIanager 

Murphy v. Cohasset . Quincy Dist Ct, C.A. No. 200456CV1 1 59 

1 IVIatter involving the Board of Selectmen 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts v. Town of Cohasset . Suffolk Sup Ct, No. 38652 

1 Matter involving the Water Commission 

Water Commission v. Tedeschi , Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 04-578 

2 Matters involving the Sewer Commission 

King Taylor Cohasset. LLC v. Town of Cohasset, Suffolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 03-0561 4A 
Jerusalem Estates v. Sewer Commission . Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 03-00103, after judgment in favor 
of the Town, on appeal to Mass. Appeals Court 

1 Matter involving the Conservation Commission 

Jerusalem Road Estates y. Cohasset Conservation Commission . Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 03-00867 

23 Matter involving the Zoning Board of Appeals 

Emanuello v. Board of Appeals . Norfolk Sup. Ct., C.A. 99-905 

Cohasset Harbor Marina v. Board of Appeals and Kulkuskie . Land Court 259744 

20 



Chief Justice Gushing Highway Corporation v. Board of Appeals . Mass Land Court, No. 243862 

Cohasset Harbor Marina v. Board of Appeals and Hurley . Land Court. No. 259078 

Ellen M. Morrissey v. Board of Appeals . Land Court No. 263788 

Sears v. Board of Appeals and Leonard P. Kupsc. Trustee of LPK:ARMF Nominee Trust . Norfolk Sup 

Ct.C.A. No. 02-1442 
Cohasset Cove LLC y. Board of Appeals . Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 00-803 
Cohasset Harbor Marina. Inc. v. Board of Appeals . Land Court No. 270044 
Ayer y. Board of Appeals et al .. Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No 03-00209 
Ayer y. Board of Appeals . Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 03-1715 
Daly et al. y. Board of Appeals . Land Court Misc. No. 292733 
Petrillo y. Board of Appeals et al .. Land Court Misc. 287659, after judgment in fayor of the Town, on 

appeal to Mass. Appeals Court 
Petrillo y. Board of Appeals et al .. Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 03-01224 
Rosano y. Board of Appeals . Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 03-01480 
Biorklund y. Board of Appeals . Land Court No. 292810 
Ayer y. Board of Appeals . Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 03-02255 
Sharpe y. Board of Appeals . Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 03-02320 

Cohasset Water Commission y. Board of Appeals and Ayalon . Mass. Land Court No. 294252 
Dwyer y. Board of Appeals et al .. Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 04-309 
Streckery. Board of Appeals . Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 04-04537 
Buck and Crowley y. Board of Appeals et a! .. Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 04-714 
Ledgewood Estates. Inc. y. Board of Appeals . Mass. Land Court No. 302403 

Matters involving the Planning Board 

Flint y. King Taylor, LLC and Planning Board , Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 04-00184 
Mill Riyer Boatyard. LLC y. Planning Board . Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 04-1023 
Kupperstein y. Planning Board et al .. Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 04-1304 
Campbell y. Planning Board et al .. Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 04-1391 

Matter involving the Harbormaster 

Cohasset Harbor Marina. Inc. y. Town of Cohasset and Cohasset Harbormaster . Mass. Land Court 
No. 250344 

Matter Involving the Paul Pratt Memorial Library 

Service Employees International Union, Local 888 v. Town of Cohasset . American Arbitration 
Association No. 11 390 02196 03 

Matters Involving the Board of Health 

Sears v. Board of Health et al .. Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 02-02122 
Susan Tehranian v. Board of Health . Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 03-00828 

Claims Pending 

Curren v. Cohasset (Police Department) 

Patois v. Cohasset (DPW) 

Secure Horizons v. Cohasset (Fire) 

DEP v. Cohasset (Town Manager, Sandy Beach) 



Respectfully submitted, 
Paul R. DeRensis 
TOWN COUNSEL 



21 



REPORT OF THE TOWN MODERATOR 



In the course of several months, while evaluating a possible run for re-election I fell back upon an 
old vaudeville nostrum "leave 'em begging for more". In paraphrasing this old saying while taking 
to heart the multiple entreaties from my many supporters urging me to run, I have instead chosen 
to leave office after four terms as Cohasset Town Moderator. I consider this the zenith of my 
tenure as moderator. From an educational point, the historical importance of Town Meeting and 
its relevance to the town of Cohasset has been underscored, demystified and elevated with each 
of my terms in office. Once considered an antiquated and ineffective form of government, in 
Cohasset it has proven to be a representative, relevant, participatory form of town government, 
which reflected the will of the people and brought ambitious town projects from wish list to reality. 

It is with enormous hope and resolve that my twelve years as your moderator will be remembered 
for such successful infrastructure, municipal and school expansions as the construction of the new 
elementary school, library, public works garage and athletic fields, the rebuilding of the water 
department infrastructure, major renovation and improvement to school facilities, the considerable 
initiatives intended to address wastewater management concerns and the adoption of the town 
manager act. 

Additionally, I wish the Marlette moderator years to be held in positive citizen regard in part to 
honor the loyal, hardworking Cohassetites who served, for twelve years, this moderator and 
citizenry. In particular, the following citizens have each made a particular contribution for which 
they deserve independent recognition. 

Grace Tuckerman 

Arthur Lehr 

Philip Lehr 

Raymond Buckley (deceased) 

Kay Lincoln 

Shirley Tewksbury 

Connie Jones (deceased) 

Louise Flint 

Fred Sigal 

Marion Douglas 

Carol St. Pierre 

Chief Roger Lincoln, our firefighters and emergency medical personnel 

Retired Police Chiefs Noonan and Jackson our police officers 

The boy, girl and cub scouts (and their parents) 

Chartis Tebbets 

Burtram Pratt (deceased) 

Frances Marks 

Jacqueline McGuire 

Deborah Protulis 

Ellen Winn 

Joyce Studley 



22 



My fellow citizens, for well over a decade you gave me not only your vote but your unswerving 
loyalty and encouragement. I sincerely hope my successor will uphold the finest traditions of 
Town Meeting and advance the objectives for the future, which I have attempted to put into place. 
I believe that above all, we must allow all Cohasset citizens full access to the Town Meeting 
process. Fundamental elements for effective town administration include mutual respect, a 
futuristic eye, open minds... and increased participation in the Town Meeting process. 

It is hoped that my worthy successor will continue to nurture and respect the Town Meeting 
process proven so effective in the Town of Cohasset. 

Many thanks to my fellow Cohasset residents and the hundreds of voters whose support I enjoy 
even now. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George Lane Marlette, Esquire 
Town Moderator 



23 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 

The Metropolitan Area Planning Council is the regional planning and economic development 
district representing 101 cities and towns in metropolitan Boston. In addition, the Council shares 
oversight responsibility for the region's federally funded transportation program as one of 14 
members of the Boston Metropolitan Planning Organization. The Council's legislative mandate is 
to provide technical and professional resources to improve the physical, social, and economic 
condition of its district, and to develop sound responses to issues of regional significance. The 
Council provides research, studies, publications, facilitation, and technical assistance in the areas 
of, land use and the environment, housing, transportation, water resources management, 
economic development, demographic and socioeconomic data, legislative policy, and interlocal 
partnerships that strengthen the operation of local governments. 

The Council is governed by 101 municipal government representatives, 21 gubernatorial 
appointees, and 10 state and 3 City of Boston officials. An Executive Committee composed of 25 
members oversees agency operations and appoints an executive director. The agency employs 
approximately 30 professional and administrative staff. Funding for Council activities is derived 
from contracts with government agencies and private entities, foundation grants, and a percapita 
assessment charged to municipalities within the district. 

In the past year, the Council has focused on initiatives that respond to regional challenges, some 
of which include: 

• Municipal planning: working with more than 25 communities under the Executive Order 
418 program. EO 418 provides communities with up to $30,000 in state funding to 
undertake overall visioning on local planning issues, including housing, economic 
development, natural resources, and transportation. 

• Bringing advanced technology to cities and towns in the region: a contract with 
Pictometry International will provide aerial photographic images that municipal 
departments, including police and fire, can utilize to improve service delivery. 

• Adoption of smart growth principles: MAPC developed and adopted principles of good 
planning practice that will encourage sustainable patterns of growth to benefit people living 
throughout the metro Boston region. MAPC is also a founding member of the 
Massachusetts Smart Growth Alliance. 

• Metro Data Center: The Center is an official US Census affiliate, helping to distribute 
demographic data throughout the region, including demographic, economic, and housing 
profiles for all 101 communities in metro Boston. 

• Transportation planning: as vice-chair of the Boston Metropolitan Planning Organization, 
MAPC worked to develop the 25-year Regional Transportation Plan as well as the annual 
Transportation Improvement Program, including transportation spending priorities for the 
region. We also spearheaded development of transportation spending criteria, taking into 
account environmental, economic, and equity considerations. 

• Metropolitan Highway System Advisory Board: MAPC staffs this board, established in 
1997 by the Commonwealth to advise the Massachusetts Turnpike Authority on issues 
relative to land use, air rights, zoning, and environmental impacts associated with 
development of land owned by the authority. 

• Regional Services Consortiums: The four regional consortiums established by MAPC 
collectively purchased $18 million in office supplies and highway maintenance services for 
its 31 member municipalities. The project also facilitates collegia! forums among members' 

24 



chief administrative officers focused on collaborative problem solving and resource sharing. 
MAPC recently became the purchasing and administrative agent for the Greater Boston 
Police Council, which assists over 300 units of local government in the purchase of police 
vehicles and other public safety supplies. 

• Metro Mayors Coalition: Working with the mayors and city managers of 10 municipalities 
in the urban core on issues such as group purchasing, employee health insurance, security 
and emergency coordination, and municipal relief legislation. 

• Homeland security: addressing homeland security issues by facilitating cross-municipal 
partnerships between police, fire, and emergency management departments to acquire and 
share equipment, and more generally to plan for emergencies involving multiple 
municipalities; fiduciary agent for state/ federal grant funding through the Massachusetts 
Executive Office of Public Safety. 

• Hazard mitigation: initiating a federally-funded partnership to produce a hazard mitigation 
plan to protect nine coastal communities in the event of natural disasters, including flood, 
winter storm, wind, fire, and geologic hazards. 

Please visit our website, www.mapc.orq. for more details about these and other activities. 

Metrofuture: Making a Greater Boston Region 

MAPC has launched a new civic process, called MetroFuture, to create an updated regional vision 
and growth strategy for metropolitan Boston. MetroFuture engages city and town governments, 
state agencies, non-profits, business, labor, and academic groups in this planning process. The 
outcome will be a vision and growth strategy that puts the region on a sustainable path in terms of 
land use, economic, environmental, and social issues. MAPC will need the support of a broad 
range of organizations in the region to help plan, fund, and implement this new framework for 
addressing the challenges facing metropolitan Boston. . 

The effort to create this new strategy was launched on October 29, 2003, at a Boston College 
Citizens Seminar. More than 400 citizens from a wide range of local and regional groups attended 
the event and expressed their opinions on the region's resources and challenges as well as their 
own visions for the future. This input will be critical as we move to the next phase of this exciting 
multi-year project. Please visit the project web site, www.metrofuture.orq. for more information. 

South Shore Coalition 

In 2004, the South Shore Coalition (SSC), one of the eight subregions of MAPC, met on a monthly 
basis to discuss issues of mutual interest from dhnking water supply, pre-disaster Mitigation 
planning, and transportation issues. SSC is comprised of the communities of Cohasset, Duxbury, 
Hanover, Hingham, Hull, Marshfield, Norwell, Pembroke, Rockland, Scituate, and Weymouth. 

During the year, SSC heard presentations regarding, and provided input to, MAPC's actions 
relating to the following regional transportation issues: Suburban Mobility Program, 2005 
Transportation Improvement Program, and the 2005 Unified Planning Work Program. SSC 
participated on the Regional Transportation Advisory Committee (RTAC), developed a set of 
subregional legislative priority issues to help guide MAPC's priorities, and reviewed the ongoing 
efforts of redevelopment taking place at the now closed South Weymouth Naval Air Station. The 
subregion was briefed periodically on the MetroFuture project, the on-going review of the 
subregions that is taking place in conjunction with the MAPC strategic planning process, and other 
activities of MAPC. 

25 



MAPC completed an Open Space Plan under Executive Order 41 8 for the Town of Rockland. 
MARC also assisted several communities by administering their planning contracts with private 
planning consultants under E0418. As a follow-up to Executive Order 418, MAPC presented 
information on three state initiatives: the Commonwealth Capital Fund, the Priority Development 
Fund, and the 40R Smart Growth Zoning initiative. MAPC also assisted Pembroke in completing 
the Commonwealth Capital Fund application. 



MAPC Annual Report prepared and submitted by Marc D. Draisen, Executive Director, 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council. 



26 



REPORT OF THE TOWN CLERK 

As the year 2004 comes to a close, I respectfully submit my thirteenth report as Town Clerk. This 
year we had four elections and two town meetings, conducted the annual census, issued dog 
licenses, business certificates, etc. Those results follow this report along with the vital records. 

On November 18, 2003, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruled that gays have the right 
to marry under our state constitution, but stayed the entry of judgment for 180 days "to permit the 
Legislature to take any action it may deem appropriate in light of this opinion." The court's ruling 
was effective May 16, 2004, for implementation on the first business day thereafter. Therefore, 
issuance of marriage licenses to same-sex applicants began on May 17, 2004, throughout the 
Commonwealth. 

As always, I would like to extend my appreciation to the citizens of Cohasset, town officials, 
department heads, town employees, election workers, and committees and to my assistant, Carol 
St. Pierre, for their support and assistance during the year. 

Respectfully submitted. 



Marion L. Douglas 
Town Clerk 



27 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY -- MARCH 2, 2004 



The polls opened at 7 a.m. and closed at 8 p.m. 

Total voters 1 2,328; Democrats - 708 - Republicans - 524. Percent - 25. 
Total absentee voters - 100 

Breakdown of absentees: (Pre. 1 ; 46 - R; 1 8 - D) 

(Pre. 2; 8 - R; 28 - D) 

Election officers sworn in by the Town Clerk, Marion L. Douglas, at 6:45 a.m. were as follows: 



Carol St.Plerre 
Katherine Lincoln 
Jean Thompson 
Margaret Hernan 
Grace Tuckerman 
Jody Doyle 



Debra Krupczak 
Helen King 
Nancy Borland 
Caria Getto 
Kathleen Rhodes 



Presidential Preference 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY - (708) 



Pre. 1 



Pre. 2 



Total 



Richard Gephardt 


1 


2 


3 


Joseph Liberman 


6 


3 


9 


Wesley K. Clark 





1 


1 


Howard Dean 


9 


2 


11 


Carol Moseley Braun 











John Edwards 


76 


89 


165 


Dennis J. Kucinich 


11 


4 


15 


John F. Kerry 


237 


248 


485 


Lyndon H. LaRouche, Jr. 


3 





3 


Al Sharpton 


2 


5 


7 


No Preference 


3 


1 


4 


Write-ins 





1 


4 


Total 


351 


357 


708 


State Committee Man 








Frederick R. Koed 


243 


281 


524 


Blanks 


106 


76 


182 


Write-ins 


2 





2 


Total 


351 


357 


708 



State Committee Woman 



Karen F. DeTellis 
Blanks 
Write-ins 
Total 



198 

151 

2 

351 



237 
119 
1 
357 



435 

270 

3 

708 



Town Committee 

Group (to vote for whole group) 
Frederick R. Koed 
Agnes McCann 



148 


193 


341 


200 


263 


463 


162 


213 


475 



28 



Edwin H. Tebbetts 


180 


222 


402 


John K. McNabb 


192 


247 


439 


Susan Kent 


154 


201 


355 


Roseanne M. McMorris 


179 


244 


423 


Patricia A. Laugelle 


171 


224 


395 


Margaret R. Charles 


174 


227 


401 


Chartis L. Tebbetts 


189 


228 


417 


Kevin McCarthy 


154 


211 


365 


Gail J. Collins 


163 


212 


375 


Julie D. McNabb 


171 


222 


393 


Mary D. Richard 


156 


202 


358 


Carol A. Barrett 


168 


213 


381 


Thomas J. Callahan 


172 


218 


390 


Coleman F. Nee 


158 


210 


368 


Lisa H. Dick 


163 


207 


370 


Edward T. Mulvey 


163 


231 


394 


Donna P. French 


159 


207 


366 


James F. French 


159 


207 


366 


Maria A. Plante 


174 


226 


400 


Mary M. Goodwin 


179 


232 


411 


Ronald Goodwin 


184 


245 


429 


Frank P. Pozniak 


167 


204 


371 


David J. McMorris 


170 


231 


401 


Write-ins 








Neil J. Murphy 


9 


7 


16 


Lucia Flibotte 


8 


7 


15 


Frank C. Hamilton 


7 


7 


14 


Jane M. Hamilton 


7 


7 


14 


Peggy W. Hassan 


7 


7 


14 


Donna McGee 


8 


8 


16 


Randall Nash 


7 


7 


14 


Dorothy O'Connell 


7 


7 


14 


Betsy Connolly 




2 


2 


Ed Connolly 




2 


2 


Blanks 


7982 


6886 


14868 



REPUBLICAN PARTY - (524) 



Presidential Preference 



State Committee Man 



Pre. 1 



Pre. 2 



Total 



George W. Bush 

No Preference 

Write-ins 

Blanks 

Total 



236 


168 


404 


43 


23 


66 


5 


1 


6 


31 


17 


48 


315 


209 


524 



John P. Cafferty 
Conley W. Ford 
Jack E. Robinson 
Ronald B. Wheatley 
Write-ins 



106 


57 


163 


73 


61 


134 


16 


12 


28 


40 


31 


71 












29 



Blanks 
Total 



80 
315 



48 
209 



128 
524 



State Committee Woman 

Paula E. Logan 

Janet R. Fogarty 

Anne M. Hilbert 

Write-ins 

Blanks 

Total 

Town Committee 

Group (to vote for whole group) 

Christopher M. Allen 

R. Murray Campbell 

Raymond F. Colella 

Terese D'Urso 

Daniel S. Evans 

David H. Farrag 

Janet R. Fogarty 

Edythe B. Ford 

Martha K. Gjesteby 

Gabriel E. Gomez 

Juliette D. Guild 

Peter S. Guild 

Louis S. Harvey 

Bruce A. Herzfelder 

Stuart W. Ivimey 

Leonora C. Jenkins 

Raymond Kasperowicz 

Alexander C. Koines 

Paula E. Logan 

Beth E. Marsden-Gilman 

Alfred S. Moore, Jr. 

Kevin F. O'Donnell, Sr. 

Nancy OToole 

Nathaniel G. Palmer 

Douglas R. Peck 

Robert B. Spofford 

Grace R. Tuckerman 

Judith P. Volungis 

Kenneth J. Roth 

George B. Watts, Jr. 

Jamie G. Williams 

Edward F. Woods 

Thomas A. Fogarty 

Matthew J. Grech 

Richard J. Silvia 

Blanks 



224 


127 


351 


83 


62 


145 


6 


15 


21 











2 


5 


7 


315 


209 


524 



124 


91 


215 


138 


102 


240 


168 


129 


297 


139 


96 


235 


164 


112 


276 


191 


112 


303 


149 


111 


260 


188 


132 


320 


167 


106 


273 


171 


129 


300 


177 


118 


295 


200 


123 


323 


177 


122 


299 


181 


128 


309 


198 


107 


305 


158 


105 


263 


161 


119 


280 


158 


123 


281 


146 


101 


247 


238 


141 


379 


157 


102 


259 


150 


113 


263 


154 


128 


282 


160 


110 


270 


172 


114 


286 


156 


111 


267 


181 


115 


296 


175 


115 


290 


158 


115 


273 


149 


116 


265 


166 


103 


269 


165 


104 


269 


190 


114 


304 


155 


109 


264 


135 


94 


229 


172 


138 


310 



5161 



3298 



8459 



Libertarian Party (0) 

30 



Presidential Preference 



Jeffrey Diket 











Ruben Perez 











Aaron Russo 











Michael Badnarik 











Gary Nolan 











No Preference 











Blanks 











Total 











State Committee Man 











State Committee Woman 











Town Committee 












Green Rainbow Party (0) 



Presidential Preference 

Kent Mesplay 
Lorna Salzman 
Paul Glover 
David Cobb 
No Preference 
Blanks 
Total 

State Committee Man 

State Committee Woman 

Town Committee 



The polls closed at 8 p.m. and the results were declared at 8:50 p.m. 
A True Record, ATTEST: 

Marion L. Douglas, Town Clerk 






























































































31 



Index Annual Town Meeting - March 27, 2004 



Article # Description of Article 

1 Hear and act on reports. Adopted unanimously. 

2 Accept town report. Adopted unanimously. 

3 Operating budget. Adopted. 

4 Unpaid bills. Withdrawn. 

5 Additional appropriations Fiscal Year 04. Adopted 

6 Citizen's petition - police investigation. Withdrawn. 

7 Add Large House Site Plan Review to zoning bylaw. Adopted. 

8 Add Demolition of Historic Buildings to general bylaw. Withdrawn. 

9 Add Political Sign Amendment to zoning bylaw. Adopted. 

10 Amend Section 2.1 of zoning bylaw - definition Multi-family Dwelling. Adopted. 

11 Little Harbor Engineering. Adopted. 

12 Community Preservation Fund 

a. Recommendation A - Funding Sub-Accounts - Adopted unanimously. 

b. Recommendation B - Housing Authority - Adopted unanimously. 

c. Recommendation C - Alumni Field Improvements - Adopted unanimously. 

d. Recommendation D - Construct New Playground Library site - Adopted. 

e. Open space purchase - Adopted unanimously. 

f. Remaining balance retained - Adopted unanimously. 

13 Land purchases for watershed and open space purposes - Adopted unanimously. 

14 Water Department - land acquisition - Adopted unanimously. 

1 5 Water Department - donation of land - Adopted unanimously. 

16 Water Department - abandon public way "Old Road" - Adopted unanimously. 

17 After article 1 1 . 

1 8 Water Department - improvements to water distribution system - Adopted 
unanimously. 

19 Water Department special act to sell water for 40 years. Withdrawn 

20 Culvert repair - West Corner - Adopted unanimously. 

21 Drainage improvements - Newtonville - Adopted unanimously. 

22 Additional easement for James Lane - Adopted unanimously. 

23 Sea wall engineering - town's share - Adopted unanimously. 

24 Elderly exemptions increased - Adopted unanimously. 

25 School construction borrowing - special act - Adopted. 

26 Add Section 42 to general bylaws - Licenses and Permits; Collections - adopted 
unanimously. 

27 Amend Section 40 of general bylaws - Building Permits appealed to Board of 
Appeals. Adopted. 



32 



Annual Town Meeting -- March 27, 2004 

At the Annual Town Meeting held on Saturday, March 27, 2004 at the Cohasset High School Sullivan 
Gymnasium the following articles were contained in the warrant and acted upon as follows. 

Checkers sworn in by the Town Clerk, Marion L. Douglas, at 9:30 a.m. were Carol St. Pierre, Janice Rosano, Debra 
Krupczak, Kathleen Rhodes, Margaret Hernan, and Nancy Barrett. Tellers were appointed and sworn in by the 
Moderator, George L. Marlette III. 

The Moderator called the meeting to order at 10:15 a.m. and a quorum of 100 was present at that time. The 
registered voters checked in on the voting list totaled for Precinct 1 - 279 and Precinct 2 - 209 for a grand total of 
488. Deacon Rooney gave the Invocation. 

Members of the Girl Scouts called the pledge of allegiance. 

Voted unanimously to dispense with the reading of the call of the Meeting and Return of Service having been 
examined by the Moderator and found to be in order. 

Representative Garrett Bradley and William E. O'Donnell, Register of Deeds, was recognized at this time. 

Article 1: 

To act upon the reports of the various Town Officers as printed in the Annual Town Report for 2003. 

Moved that the reports of the various Town Officers as printed in the Annual Town Report for 2003 be accepted, and 

filed with the permanent records of the Town. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 
Article 2: 

To hear the reports of any Committee heretofore chosen and act thereon. 

Moved that the reports of any Committee heretofore chosen be heard and accepted and that Committee continue in 
office. 

Reports were heard from Roseanne McMorris for the Board of Selectmen, Ralph Dormitzer on the Citizens Action 
Committee for Logan Runway, Joseph Nedrow on the Senior Housing Committee, and Robert Spofford on the School 
Building Committee. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 3: 

To see if the Town will vote to fix salaries and compensation of Elected Officers, and to see what sums the Town will 
vote to raise and appropriate from available funds or othen/vise, for the payment of the salaries and compensation, 
expenses, equipment and outlays, capital and otherwise, of the several Town Departments, for the ensuing fiscal 
year. 



33 



APPENDIX A 

TOWN MANAGER'S RECOMMENDATIONS, ARTICLE 3 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING MARCH 27, 2004 



Dept. 
No. 



ApDropriation Account 



Expended 
Fiscal 2002 



Expended 
Fiscal 2003 



Appropriated 
Fiscal 2004 



Department 
Requested 
Fiscal 2005 



Town 
Manager 
Recommended 
Fiscal 2005 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



114 



Moderator 



Personal Services 



Elected Officials 
General Expenses 



Personal Services 
Town Hall Clerical 
General Expenses 



General Expenses 



Reserve Fund 



Personal Services 
General Expenses 



Elected Officials 
Personal Services 
General Expenses 



Personal Services 
General Expenses 



General Expenses 



Town Reports 

Parking Clerk 

Annual Audit 

South Shore Coalition - Refuse 

Water Purchase 

Plumbing & Gas Inspections 

Sealer Weights/Measures Salary 

Sealer Weights/Measures Expenses 

Emergency Management Salaries 

Veteran's Agent Salary 

Veteran's Agent Expenses 

Commission on Disabilities 



$1.00 $2.00 

1 22 Board of Selectmen 



$573.00 



$573.00 



$573.00 



$5,499.84 


$5,499.84 


$5,500.00 


$5,500.00 


$5,500.00 


$100,383.35 


$79,781.07 


$90,832.00 


$66,012.00 


$66,012.00 


129 


Town Manager 








$90,000.00 


$102,500.00 


$105,475.00 


$105,475.00 


$105,475.00 


$362,728.64 


$401,969.00 


$420,990.00 


$399,263.00 


$399,263.00 


$3,192.00 


$6,122.29 


$6,360.00 


$6,360.00 


$6,360.00 


131 


Advisory Committee 








$0.00 


$145.00 


$345.00 


$345.00 


$345.00 


133 


Reserve Fund 








$0.00 


$0.00 


$193,000.00 


$100,000.00 


$100,000.00 


1 35 Director of Finance/Town Accountant 






$75,200.00 


$82,900.00 


$87,865.00 


$87,865.00 


$87,865.00 


$29,023.10 


$31,018.19 


$27,300.00 


$30,300.00 


$30,300.00 


141 


Board of Assessors 






•• 


$3,699.96 


$3,699.96 


$3,700.00 


$3,700.00 


$3,700.00 


$61,375.60 


$56,239.00 


$59,682.00 


$60,320.00 


$60,320.00 


$16,649.19 


$9,670.07 


$11,505,00 


$51,505.00 


$26,505.00 


145 


Treasurer Collector 








$57,999.76 


$60,999.88 


$62,769.00 


$62,969.00 


$62,969.00 


$32,881.29 


$41,027.09 


$42,750.00 


$42,750.00 


$42,750.00 


151 


Legal Budget 








$185,935.4600 


$181,891.66 


$170,000.00 


$120,000.00 


$120,000.00 


152 


Miscellaneous 








$14,850.26 


$12,418.86 


$16,000.00 


$16,000.00 


$16,000.00 


$177.50 


$1,962.00 


$2,500.00 


$2,500.00 


$2,500.00 


$8,500.00 


$8,500.00 


$8,500.00 


$8,500.00 


$8,500.00 


$4,000.00 


$4,000.00 


$4,000.00 


$4,000.00 


$4,000.00 


$39,126.63 


$35,000.00 


$45,000.00 


$67,000.00 


$67,000.00 


$7,030.00 


$9,642.16 


$6,500.00 


$6,500.00 


$6,500.00 


$2,599.92 


$2,599.92 


$2,600.00 


$2,600.00 


$2,600.00 


s $282.11 


$450.00 


$450.00 


$450.00 


$450.00 


$350.00 


$0.00 


$450.00 


$450.00 


$450.00 


$1,466.63 


$1,599.96 


$1,600.00 


$1,600.00 


$1,600.00 


$488.50 


$0.00 


$1,000.00 


$1,000.00 


$1,000.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 



34 



Dept. 
No. 



ADpropriation Account 



Expended 
Fiscal 2002 


Expended 
Fiscal 2003 


Appropriated 
Fiscal 2004 


Department 
Requested 
Fiscal 2005 


Town 

Manager 

Recommended 

Fiscal 2005 


$0.00 
$600.00 
$174.89 

$0.00 

$100.00 

$1,700.00 


$0.00 
$600.00 
$182.53 
$100.00 
$100.00 
$1,700.00 


$200.00 
$600.00 
$200.00 
$100.00 
$100.00 
$2,500.00 


$200.00 
$600.00 
$200.00 
$100.00 
$100.00 
$2,500.00 


$200.00 
$600.00 
$200.00 
$100.00 
$100.00 
$2,500.00 


161 Town Clerk & Elections 








$50,399.96 

$7,711.70 

$17,718.46 


$52,920.00 
$12,682.62 
$11,458.63 


$54,455.00 

$13,833.00 

$9,706.00 


$54,455.00 
$16,466.00 
$10,562.00 


$54,455.00 
$16,466.00 
$10,562.00 


171 Conservation Commission 






$26,416.30 


$27,052.74 


$27,800.00 


$27,800.00 


$27,800.00 


175 


Planning Board 








$51,980.20 


$60,543.30 


$44,730.00 


$44,730.00 


$44,730.00 



Historical Commission 
Historical Preservation Salary 
Historical Preservation Expenses 
Keeper of the Town Clock 
Keeper of the Town Pump 
Town Celebrations 



Elected Officials 
Part-time Salaries 
General Expenses 



Genera! Expenses 



Payroll & General Expenses 



General Expenses 



1 76 Zoning Board of Appeals 
$1,751.20 $4,383.72 $4,385.00 



$4,385.00 



$4,385.00 



TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT $1,261,994.27 $1,311,361.49 $1,535,955.00 $1,415,735.00 



$1,390,735.00 



Personal Services 
General Expenses 
Cruiser Purchase 



Personal Services 
General Expenses 
Hydrant Rental 



Personal Services 
General Expenses 



General Expenses 



PUBLIC SAFETY 



210 Police Department 



$1,445,190.29 
$77,770.59 
$51,923.00 



$1,503,973.07 
$97,628.54 
$74,000.00 



220 Fire Department 



$1,314,784.44 
$122,153.27 
$127,607.87 



$1,446,969.36 
$146,080.22 
$131,575.00 



$1,511, 
$96, 
$28, 



$1,454, 

$146, 

$27, 



241 Building Commissioner 



$57,400.00 
$3,544.99 



$60,400.00 
$3,955.00 



245 Electrical Inspector 
$14,499.29 $14,430.13 

295 Harbor Master 



$62, 
$3, 



318.00 
850.00 
000.00 



669.00 
520.00 
414.00 



140.00 
955.00 



$16,500.00 



$1,519,634.00 
$99,850.00 
$84,000.00 



$1,512,604.00 
$218,510.00 
$142,073.00 



$62,140.00 
$3,955.00 



$16,500.00 



$1,519,634.00 
$99,850.00 
$28,000.00 



$1,468,462.00 

$159,610.00 

$67,414.00 



$62,140.00 
$3,955.00 



$16,500.00 



Personal Services 
General Expenses 



Personal Services 
General Expenses 

TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 



$61,157.80 
$4,590.60 


$65,043.00 
$5,953.15 


$61,153.00 
$7,400.00 


$61,1533.00 
$7,400.00 


$61,153.00 
$7,400.00 


296 


Shellfish Constable 








$0.00 
$0.00 


$500.00 
$500.00 


$500.00 
$0.00 


$500.00 
$0.00 


$500.00 
$0.00 


$3,280,762.14 


$3,551,007.47 
35 


$3,416,419.00 


$3,728,319.00 


$3,494,618.00 



Dept. 

No. ApDropriation Account 



Expended 
Fiscal 2002 



Expended 
Fiscal 2003 



Appropriated 
Fiscal 2004 



Department 
Requested 
Fiscal 2005 



Town 

Manager 

Recommended 

Fiscal 2005 



Salaries 

Expenses 

Special Education Salaries 

Special Education Expenses 

Sub Total 



Salaries 

Expenses 

Special Education Salaries 

Special Education Expenses 

Sub Total 



Salaries 

Expenses 

Special Education Salaries 

Special Education Expenses 

Sub Total 



Salaries 

Expenses 

Special Education Salaries 

Special Education Expenses 

Sub Total 



SCHOOLS 



300 Cohasset Public Schools 
Osgood Elementary School 



$1,449,682.92 

$180,309.64 

$216,382.89 

$6,162.85 



$1,623,693.00 

$162,003.00 

$396,532.00 

$1,745.00 



$1,627,541.00 

$171,425.00 

$413,789.00 

$3,115.00 



$1,535,829.00 

$282,102.00 

$525,340.00 

$2,865.00 



Deer Hill Elementary School 



$1,376,785.16 

$126,733.42 

$252,239.71 

$2,614.11 



$1,642,220.00 

$106,310.00 

$345,003.00 

$3,463.00 



$1,686,829.00 

$112,337.00 

$391,855.00 

$2580.00 



$1,597,486.00 

$233,442.00 

$452,031.00 

$2,409.00 



$1,758,372.40 $2,096,996.00 $2,193,601.00 

Middle/Senior High School 

$3,465,926.61 $3,848,372.00 $3,707,839.00 

$464,173.17 $423,997.00 $627,689.00 

$332,990.33 $368,163.00 $362,985.00 

$3,977.80 $2,256.00 $4,931.00 

$4,267,067.91 $4,642,788.00 $4,703,444.00 

All District 



$3,796,346.00 

$874,857.00 

$359,479.00 

$4,731.00 



$484,260.70 
$333,960.92 
$385,979.45 
$862,420.52 



$475,412.00 
$521,277.00 
$207,640.00 
$715,519.00 



$547,196.00 
$376,950.00 
$255,232.00 
$926,536.00 



$601,032.00 
$491,028.00 
$280,140.00 
$904,683.00 



$1,535,829.00 

$282,102.00 

$525,340.00 

$2,865.00 



$1,852,538.30 $2,183,973.00 $2,215,870.00 $2,346,136.00 $2,346,136.00 



$1,597,486.00 

$233,442.00 

$452,031.00 

$2,409.00 



$2,285,368.00 $2,285,368.00 



$3,796,346.00 

$874,857.00 

$359,479.00 

$4,731.00 



$5,035,413.00 $5,035,413.00 



$601,032.00 
$491,028.00 
$280,140.00 
$904,683.00 



$2,066,621.59 $1,919,798.00 $2,105,914.00 $2,276,883.00 $2,276,883.00 



Total Cohasset Public Schools 



Regional Assessment 



TOTAL SCHOOLS 



$9,944,600.20 $10,843,555.00 $11,218,829.00 $11,943,800.00 $11,943,800.00 
301 South Shore Vocational Technical 
$55,125.00 $79,280.00 $58,238.00 $59,238.00 $59,238.00 



$9,999,725.20 $10,922,835.00 $11,278,067.00 $12,003,038.00 $12,003,038.00 



Personal Services 
General Expenses 
Building Maintenance 
Snow & Ice Control 
Street Lighting 



TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 



422 



PUBLIC WORKS 
Department of Public Works 



$553,802.93 
$571,096.80 
$311,461.80 
$37,1748.75 
$53,390.75 



$634,236.80 
$448,936.20 
$303,660.93 
$156,401.92 
$48,410.48 



$690,671.00 

$508,454.00 

$373,445.00 

$50,626.00 

$55,890.00 



$694,605.00 

$550,840.00 

$396,822.00 

$50,626.00 

$55,890.00 



$694,605.00 

$550,840.00 

$396,822.00 

$50,626.00 

$55,890.00 



$1526,931.03 $1,591,646.33 $1,679,086.00 $1,748,783.00 $1,748,783.00 



36 



Dept. 

No. ApproDhation Account 



Expended Expended Appropriated 
Fiscal 2002 Fiscal 2003 Fiscal 2004 



Department 
Requested 
Fiscal 2005 



Town 

Manager 

Recommended 

Fiscal 2005 



General Expenses 



Personal Expenses 
General Expenses 



HEALTH & SANITATION 

440 Sewers 

$439,598.85 $610,679.58 $814,264.00 

510 Board of Health 

$91,680.72 $95,595.00 $102,541.00 

$10,108.9 $9,724.45 $12,241.00 



$871,678.00 



$102,541.00 
$32,241.00 



$871,678.00 



$126,274.00 
$12,241.00 



TOTAL HEALTH & SANITATION $541,388.47 $715,999.03 $929,046.00 $1,006,460.00 $1,010,193.00 



Personal Services 
General Expenses 



HUMAN SERVICES 
541 Elder Affairs Board 



$98,434.24 
$29,067.89 



$103,062.44 
$28,911.38 



$122,417.00 
$30,825.00 



$144,979.00 
$36,605.00 



$122,617.00 
$36,605.00 



TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES 



$127,502.13 



$131,973.82 



$153,242.00 



$181,584.00 



$159,222.00 



CULTURE AND RECREATION 



Personal Services 
General Expenses 



Personal Expenses 
General Expenses 



$267,873.05 
$70,237.00 

630 

$104,520.21 
$4,371.75 



610 Library 

$289,560.00 
$82,064.73 

Recreation Commission 

$119,444.09 
$6,258.18 



$324,056.00 
$78,833.00 



$116,505.00 
$6,380.00 



$342,271.00 
$84,418.00 



$116,505.00 
$6,380.00 



$336,878.00 
$84,418.00 



$116,505.00 
$6,.380.00 



TOTAL CULTURE & RECREATION $447,002.01 



$497,327.00 



$525,774.00 $549,574.00 



$544,181.00 



Principal 
Interest 
Excluded Debt 



OTHER BUDGETS 



710 Debt Service 



$762,589.52 

$386,068.75 

$1,743,982.21 

911 



$933,197.81 

$469,372.69 

$2,085,571.90 

Benefits and Insurance 



$1,033,271.00 

$390,109.00 

$2,381,703.00 



Pension • County Assessment $624,671.00 $634,692.00 

Pension - Non Contributory Assessment$3,316.80 $3,316.80 

Workers Compensation Insurance $49,999.00 $69,013.00 

Unemployment Insurance $4,581.40 $2,262.25 



$727,611.00 
$3,400.00 

$105,000.00 
$5,000.00 



$1,160,300.00 

$400,472.00 

$2,366,540.00 



$793,665.00 
$3,400.00 

$105,000.00 
$5,000.00 



$1,014,301.00 

$421,322.00 

$2,366,540.00 



$793,665.00 
$3,400.00 

$105,000.00 
$5,000.00 



37 



Dept. 

No. Appropriation Account 



Expended 
Fiscal 2002 



Expended 
Fiscal 2003 



Appropriated 
Fiscal 2004 



Department 
Requested 
Fiscal 2005 



Town 

Manager 

Recommended 

Fiscal 2005 



Health Insurance $1,308,289.89 $1,601,127.00 $1731,715.00 $1,872,901.00 $1,872,901.00 

Life Insurance $5,086.02 $5,440.47 $5,200.00 $6,760.00 $6,760.00 

Medicare Tax- Employer Contribution$1 34,673.53 $155,776.00 $149,000.00 $180,000.00 $175,000.00 

Property & Liability Insurance $157,302.32 $185,491.09 $175,000.00 $195,000.00 $195,000.00 



TOTAL OTHER BUDGETS 



$5,180,560.44 $6,144,261.01 $6,708,009.00 $7,089,038.00 $6,938,889.00 



WATER DEPARTMENT 
450 Water Department 



General Expenses 
Other Appropriations 
Maturing Debt 
Interest 



$624,905.40 
$106,785.59 
$661,910.00 
$402,983.32 



$690,220.01 

$14,193.28 

$661,910.00 

$353,819.98 



$770,187.00 
$131,296.00 
$656,910.00 
$371,545.00 



$888,100.00 
$131,296.00 
$663,160.00 
$406,279.00 



$888,100.00 
$131,296.00 
$663,160.00 
$406,279.00 



TOTAL WATER DEPARTMENT 



$1796,584.31 $1,725,143.27 $1,929,938.00 $2,088,835.00 



$2,088,835.00 



TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET $24,162,450.00 $26,591,554.42 $28,155,536.00 $29,811,366.00 $29,378,494.00 







SUMMARY 








General Government 


$1,261,994.27 


$1,311,361.49 


$1,535,955.00 


$1415,735.00 


$1390,735.00 


Public Safety 


$3,280,762.14 


$3,551,007.47 


$3,416,419.00 


$3,728,319.00 


$3,494,618.00 


Schools 


$9,999,725.20 


$10,922,835.00 


$11,278,067.00 


$12,003,038.00 


$12,003,038.00 


Department of Public Works 


$1,526,931.03 


$1,591,646.33 


$1,679,086.00 


$1,748,783.00 


$1,748,783.00 


Health and Sanitation 


$541,988.47 


$715,999.03 


$929,046.00 


$1,006,460.00 


$1,010,193.00 


Human Services 


$127,502.13 


$131,973.82 


$153,242.00 


$181,584.00 


$159,222.00 


Culture and Recreation 


$447,002.01 


$497,327.00 


$525,774.00 


$549,574.00 


$544,181.00 


Other Budgets 


$5,180,560.44 


$6,144,261.01 


$6,708,009.00 


7,089,038.00 


$6,938,889.00 


Water Department 


$1,796,584.31 


$1,725,143.27 


$1,929,938.00 


$2,088,835.00 


$2,088,835.00 


TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET 


$24,162,450.00 


$26,591,554.42 


$28,155,536.00 


$29,811,366.00 


$29,378,494.00 















38 



Pay 



Position 



Schedule 



Group Authorized 

Hours 



Schedule 1- Regular Employees 



Board of Assessors 




Deputy/Assessor/Appraiser 


Contract 


Assistant /Assessor 


H 


Building Department 


Contract 


Clerk 


D 


Civilian Dispatch 




Communication Supervisor 


H 


Communication Officer 


F 


Communication Officer 


F 


Elder Affairs 




Director 


Contract 


Elder Advocate 


G 


Van Driver 


F 


Clerk 


G 


Fire Department 




Fire Chief 


Contract 


Captain 


FS-12 


Firefighter- Paramedic 


FS-11 


Firefighter- EMT 


FS-10 


Firefighter - Mechanic 


FS-10 


Private 


FS-09 


Harbor Department 




Harbormaster 


Contract 


Health, Board of 




Health Agent 


Contract 


Health/Sevy/er Secretary 


H 


Library 




Chief Librarian 


Contract 


Staff Librarian 


L5 


Staff Librarian 


L5 


Library Assistant 


lA 


Library Technician 


L3 


Library Technician 


L3 


Senior Clerk 


L2 


Planning Board/Conservation Commission 


Town Planner 


Contract 


Secretary 


G 



1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

3 
1 



1 
1 
1 

1 

4 
9 
7 
1 
3 



1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 



7 
7 



5 
5 
5 
5 
5 



6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 



40 
30 
40 
21 

40 
40 
16 

40 
24 
19 
25 

40 
42 
42 
42 
42 
42 

40 

40 
40 

40 
35 
32 
32 
35 
19 
35 

25 
40 



39 



Police Department 










Police Chief 


Contract 


1 






Sergeant 


PS-11 


4 


4 


40 


Patrolman 


PS-09 


14 


4 


37.5 


Secretary 


G 


1 


7 


35 


Public Works, Department of 










Superintendent 


Contract 


1 




40 


General Foreman 


K 


1 


1 


40 


Working Foreman 


1 


4 


1 


40 


Heavy Equipment Operator 


G 


3 


1 


40 


Skilled Utility Worker 


F 


4 


1 


40 


Tree Climber 


F 


1 


1 


40 


Maintenance Worker 


F 


3 


1 


40 


Skilled Utility Worker CemeteryF 


1 


1 


40 


Clerk 


G 


1 


1 


30 


Recreation 










Director 


Contract 


1 




40 


Selectmen, Board of 










Adm. Assist.Human Resources 


H 


11 


40 


Secretary/Receptionist 


F 


1 


1 


35 


Director of Finance/Town Accountant 








Dir. Finance/Town Accountant Contract 


1 




40 


Assistant Town Accountant 


G 


1 


7 


21 


Administrative Assistant 


G 


1 


7 


40 


Town Clerk 










Assistant Town Clerk 


G 


1 


7 


40 


Town Manager 










Town Manger 


Contract 


1 




40 


Treasurer/Collector 










Treasurer/Collector 


Contract 


1 




40 


Assistant Treasurer/Collector 


H 


1 


7 


40 


Assistant to Treasurer 


G 


1 


7 


25 


Schedule 1a - Elected EmDiovees 










Town Clerk 


$54,455 








Clerk, Board of Registrars 


$329 








Moderator 


$1 








Board of Selectmen: 










Chair 


$1,500 








Members (4) at $1,000 


$4,000 








Board of Assessors: 










Chair 


$1,300 









Members (2) at A$1 ,200 $2,400 



40 



Schedule 2a - Part Time Positions Annual 
Veterans' Agent $1,600 

Member, Board of Registrars $326 

Sealer of Weights and IVIeasures $2,600 
Town Archivist $600 

Director of Emergency Management $350 
Asst. Dir. of Emergency Management $100 
Shellfish Constable $500 

Animal Control Officer $17,220 

Keeper of the Town Clock $1 00 

Keeper of the Town Pump $1 00 

Schedule 2b - Part Time Positions Hourly ** 

Assistant Harbor Master $10.00 

Casual Labor $6.75 

Election Officers $8.85 

Election Clerk $9.10 

Election Warden $9.36 

Summer Patrolman $14.00 

Police Matron $13.00 

Deputy Building Inspector (H-Min) $16.40 

Library Pages $8.00 

Recording Secretary $12.07 

Schedule 3 - Part Time Positions 

Constable - Per Notice $20.00 

Schedule 4 - Informational Only 

Police Department (Collective Bargaining Unit) 

Schedule 5 - Informational Only 

Fire Department (Collective Bargaining Unit) 

Schedule 6 - Informational Only 

Library (Collective Bargaining Unit) 

Schedule 7 - Informational Only 

Municipal Clerical and Custodial (Collective Bargaining Unit) 

Exempt Positions - Per the Fair Labor Standards Act 

Deputy Assessor Appraiser Chief Librarian 

Building Commissioner Police Chief 

Director of Finance/Town Accountant Recreation Director 

Elder Affairs Director Superintendent of Public Works 

Fire Chief Town Manager 

Harbormaster Treasurer/Collector 

Health Agent Town Planner 

41 



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Moved that Twenty Nine Million Three Hundred Seventy Eight Thousand Four Hundred Ninety 
Four ($29,378,494.00) Dollars be appropriated for the Fiscal Year 2005 Annual Town Budget to be 
allotted as follows: Sixty Three Thousand Nine Hundred Eighty Five ($63,985.00) Dollars for 
salaries of elected Town Officials consisting of the Town Clerk $54,455.00; Clerk, Board of 
Registrars, $329.00; Moderator, $1.00; Selectmen, Chairman, $1,500.00, Members (4) at 
$1,000.00, $4,000.00; Board of Assessors, Chairman, $1,300.00, Members (2) at $1,200.00, 
$2,400.00; and the remaining Twenty Nine Million Three Hundred Fourteen Thousand Five 
Hundred Nine ($29,314,509.00)Dollars for Personal Services, Expenses and Capital Outlays, 
Interest on Maturing Debt and other charges for various departments as recommended for 
purposes in Appendix A as attached to these Town Manager's Recommended Motions for the 2004 
Annual Town Meeting and Appendix B of the Warrant for the 2004 Annual Town Warrant, a copy of 
which Appendices are incorporated here by reference, and to meet the appropriation, the following 
transfers are made: 



$2,088,835.00 from Water Revenue 

$ 279,716.00 from Stabilization Fund 

$ 120,284.00 from Surplus Reserve 

$ 80,000.00 from Pension Reserve 

$ 30,000.00 from Sale of Lots 

$ 10,000.00 from Waterways Fund 

and the remaining balance of $26,769,659.00 is raised from taxation and other general revenues of 
the Town; and further that the Salary Rate and Schedule as printed in the Warrant and shown in 
Appendix B be adopted. 

Amendment offered by Alfred Slanetz. 

Motion to amend the Budget: By transferring $105,000.00 to Department Number 300 Cohasset 
Public Schools Department Number 210 Police Department Line Item Personal Services with the 
request that the Cohasset School Committee retain the three teachers that it proposed to eliminate 
from Osgood and Deer Hill Schools. 

Amendment is defeated. 

Amendment offered by Roy Fitzsimmons. 

Moved that we reduce the School Budget by $400,000. 

Amendment is defeated. 

Amendment offered by Andrew Quigley. 

Decrease $40,000.00 from Department Number 422 Department of Public Works by $40,000.00 
and decrease $65,000.00 from Department 133 Reserve Fund and transfer $105,000.00 to 
Department 300 Cohasset Public Schools. 

Amendment offered by Alfred Slanetz. 

Decrease $40,000 from Department Number 151 Legal Budget in place of transferring $40,000.00 
from Department Number 422 Department of Public Works as offered in the amendment by Andrew 
Quigley. 

Amendment offered by Alfred Slanetz is defeated. 

Amendment offered by Andrew Quigley is defeated. 



45 



A 2/3's vote is required. Main motion is adopted by the required 2/3's. 



Resolution offered by Richard Flynn, Chairman of the School Committee. 

WHEREAS Dr. Edward Malvey has, for the past six years, faithfully served as the Superintendent 
of the Cohasset School District making the well being of the entire school community as his first 
priority. 

AND WHEREAS Dr. Edward Malvey has diligently overseen the successful renovation and 
reconstruction of the Deer Hill School and the Cohasset Middle High School, leaving us with 
buildings that the entire community can be proud of, that will benefit future generations of Cohasset 
children, 

AND WHEREAS Dr. Edward Malvey has conscientiously endeavored to keep Cohasset students, 
teachers and administrators motivated to achieve new heights academically, while dealing 
realistically with current budget realities, and at the same guiding us through the re-accreditation 
process, 

LET IT BE KNOWN, that I, on behalf of the Cohasset School Committee and the Town of 
Cohasset, extend our deepest appreciation and thanks on the day, March 27, 2004, to Dr. Edward 
Malvey for all of this hard work and dedication as Superintendent and wish him future success, 
good luck, and a warm wind at his back in whatever he pursues. 

Resolution adopted unanimously. 
Article 4: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, and/or borrow 
pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum or sums of money, to be expended by the Town 
Manager, to pay for unpaid bills from previous fiscal year. 

VENDOR AMOUNT REQUESTED 

Moved that the article be withdrawn from consideration. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 5: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, and/or transfer from available funds, a sum or 
sums of money, to be expended by the Town Manager, needed by various departmental budgets 
and appropriations to complete the fiscal year ending June 30, 2004. 

Board of Selectmen Expenses $ 20,000.00 

Legal Expenses $ 125,000.00 

Police Department Salaries $ 60,000.00 

Police Department Expenses $ 10,000.00 

Fire Department Salaries $ 75,000.00 

Fire Department Expenses $ 10,000.00 

School Department Budget $200,000.00 

Total $500,000.00 



46 



Moved that Five Hundred Thousand ($500,000.00) Dollars, to be expended by the Town Manager, 
needed by various departmental budgets and appropriations to complete the fiscal year ended June 
30, 2005, be transferred as follows: 

Transfer Funds From: 

Surplus Revenue $279,716.00 

Overlay Surplus $ 75,000.00 

Advisory Committee Reserve Fund $ 68,000.00 

Workers' Compensation Insurance $ 29,1 71 .00 

Pension County Assessment $ 48.113.00 

Total $500,000.00 



Transfer Funds To: 

Board of Selectmen Expenses $ 20,000.00 

Legal Expenses $125,000.00 

Police Department Salaries $ 60,000.00 

Police Department Expenses $ 10,000.00 

Fire Department Salaries $ 75,000.00 

Fire Department Expenses $ 10,000.00 

School Department Budget $200,000.00 

Total $500,000.00 

Motion is adopted. 

Article 6: 

To see if the Town will vote to approve hiring an independent counsel and to raise and appropriate, 
transfer from available funds, and/or borrow, pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum or sums of 
money, for the purpose of investigating the alleged misconduct, the actions taken to remedy the 
misconduct and identify any potential abuse of power, fraud, or deceit that may have taken place 
and to report findings to the Town by April 30, 2004. This article is intended to take effect upon 
passage in Fiscal Year 2004. 

Moved that the article be withdrawn from consideration. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 7: 

To see if the Town will add a new note 12 after the Table of Uses in Section 4.3 of the Cohasset 
Zoning Bylaw that reads as follows: 

"12. All residential uses shall be subject to Section 5.5; 

and, further, to see if the Town will add the following new definition to the list of definitions in 
Section 2 of the Zoning Bylaws to be hereby amended by adding the following new definition: 

"Residential Gross Floor Area ("RGFA") - The sum of the total Floor Area - Gross, as defined 
herein, of the above grade floors or portions of floors in a residential structure, excluding unfinished 
attics, unheated space and attached or detached garages."; 



47 



and, further, to see if the Town will add a new subsection 5.5 to Section 5 of the Zoning Bylaw, 
Area Regulations, to create a "Large House Site Plan Review" process as follows: 

5.5 LARGE HOUSE SITE PLAN REVIEW 

5.5.1 Notwithstanding the area requirements set forth in preceding subsections of this Section 5, 
and any variances obtained from same, the RGFA for any residential building or structure, 
in any residential district, to be constructed pursuant to a building permit issued on or after 
2/18/04 either as new construction or as an alteration, expansion/ extension/ enlargement, 
reconstruction or replacement of an existing residential building or structure, may not 
exceed the greater of 3,500 square feet or 10% of the area of the lot up to a maximum of 
6,000 square feet, absent review as follows. This threshold does not nullify the applicability 
of any of the other area regulations set forth in Section 5 that may or may not have an 
impact upon the calculation of RGFA. 

5.5.2 Where the RGFA exceeds these limits, the proposed work shall be submitted for Site Plan 
Review by the Planning Board as the permit granting authority. The Planning Board may 
approve or approve with conditions by a majority vote of the Planning Board a Large House 
Site Plan, as long as the application for review is complete and the application meets the 
mitigation objectives set forth below. The visual compatibility with the surrounding area Is 
promoted and negative impacts substantially mitigated through such efforts as the 
following: 

a. Use of building design and massing, building materials, and architectural techniques that 
place the building in harmony with the prevailing character and scale of buildings in the 
neighborhood. 

b. Selection of a location on the lot, including the use of setbacks greater than the minimum 
required, integration into the existing terrain and surrounding landscape, and building 
orientation, in such a way to avoid or mitigate any differences in architectural scale from 
that prevailing in the neighborhood. 

c. Retention of existing mature trees and other vegetation and addition of new landscaping 
features to visually soften the impact of house construction. 

d. Avoidance of use of wetlands, and minimization of use of steep slopes, flood plains, 
hilltops. 

e. Preservation of natural or historic features of the site, and minimization of tree, vegetation 
and soil removal, blasting and grade changes. 

f. Maximum retention of open space. 

g. Treatment of the areas within the front yards setback unless inappropriate for other 
reasons, being consistent with that prevailing in the vicinity, such as whether such areas 
are retained in a natural state, or have had understory vegetation cleared and replaced with 
dense plantings, or have extensive mown lawns, or street edge - defining elements such 
as fences, walls or hedges that are prevalent in other residences along the street. 

h. Avoidance of prominent on-lot automobile impact through location and orientation of 

garage entrances, curved driveway alignment and narrow width of driveways as they 

approach the street, and other means, 
i. Site design being configured to avoid large changes in existing grades and earth removal, 

and avoidance of use of planting species not either indigenous to or common within the 

vicinity, 
j. Consideration being given to abutting properties, protecting their privacy, access to sun 

and light, screening utilities and objectionable features, and preserving the integrity of 

existing vegetation that abuts or overhangs property boundaries. 

5.5.3 (a) Submission requirements and procedures for this review shall be governed by Section 
12.6(3)-(10) inclusive of the Zoning Bylaws, incorporated here by reference. 

(b) The Planning Board may supplement the standards and criteria set forth in Section 
5.5.2 by the promulgation of rules and regulations. 



48 



(c) The Planning Board may waive strict compliance with or applicability of any standard or 
criteria upon an appropriate finding that such is not applicable to the particular proposal 
before the Board. 
5.5.4 If a new construction or alteration, expansion, extension/enlargement, reconstruction or 
replacement proposal requires both one or more variances from the area regulations of 
Section 5 and Site Plan Review under this subsection, the applicant shall seek all variances 
from the Zoning Board of Appeals first, and then seek this review. Each of these reviews is 
independent of the other, and the grant of one or more variances does not mandate 
approval under this Site Plan Review. 



Moved that a new note 12 be added in Section 4.3 of the Cohasset Zoning Bylaw that reads as 
follows: 

"12. All residential uses shall be subject to Section 5.5."; 

and, further, that the definitions in Section 2 of the Zoning Bylaws be hereby amended by adding 
the following new definition: 

"Residential Gross Floor Area ("RGFA") - The sum of the total Floor Area - Gross, as defined 
herein, of the above grade floors or portions of floors in a residential structure, excluding unfinished 
attics, unheated space and attached or detached garages."; 

and, further, that Section 5 of the Zoning Bylaw, Area Regulations, be hereby amended by inserting 
a new sub-section 5.5 to create a "Large House Plan Review" process as follows: 

5.5 LARGE HOUSE PLAN REVIEW 

5.5.1 Notwithstanding the area requirements set forth in preceding subsections of this Section 5, 
and any vahances obtained from same, the RGFA for any residential building or structure, 
in any residential district, to be constructed pursuant to a building permit issued on or after 
2/18/04 either as new construction or as an alteration, expansion/ extension/ enlargement, 
reconstruction or replacement of an existing residential building or structure, may not 
exceed the greater of 3,500 square feet or 10% of the area of the lot up to a maximum of 
6,000 square feet, absent review as follows. This threshold does not nullify the applicability 
of any of the other area regulations set forth in Section 5 that may or may not have an 
impact upon the calculation of RGFA. 



5.5.2 Where the RGFA exceeds these limits, the proposed work shall be submitted for a Large 
House Plan Review by the Planning Board. The Planning Board shall review and discuss 
the Large House Plan with the applicant and abutters, toward the objective of making the 
proposed plan harmonious with, and not harmful, injurious or objectionable to existing uses 
in the area. 



5.5.3 A person applying for a Large House Plan Review shall file an application with the Planning 
Board, including copies of a site plan and a filing fee, as required by the Planning Board. 
The application and site plan shall include the elements to be reviewed by the Planning 
Board and shall also include such further information as the Planning Board shall 
reasonably require by rule or regulation. Not less then two permanent survey monuments 
shall be located on the property in question and shown on the plan, unless waived by the 
Planning Board. In subsequent applications concerning the same subject matter, the 
Planning Board may waive the filing of plans and documents to the extent they duplicate 



49 



those previously filed. Copies of the rules and regulations concerning the Large House 
Plan Review shall be filed with the Town Clerk. 

5.5.4 (a) The Planning Board shall hold a hearing within 35 days of the filing of an application 
with the Town Clerk for a Large House Plan Review with respect to a residential building or 
structure having an RGFA exceeding the threshold established by Section 5.5.1. 

(b) The Planning Board shall, within one week of receipt of site plan application, transmit to 
appropriate town boards and departments, for review, one copy of the application and site 
plan. 

(c) Notice of such hearing shall be given to the applicant and all abutters in the manner 
called for in the Planning Board rules and regulations. 

(d) Within 21 days after the conclusion of the public hearing, the Planning Board shall 
inform the Building Inspector that the hearing has been completed and furnish the 
Building Inspector, in writing, with any recommendations which are relevant to the 
issuance of the building permit. 

A 2/3's vote required. Motion adopted by the required 2/3's. 

Resolution offered by Patricia Martin, Member of the School Committee, for Mark DeGiacomo. 

WHEREAS Mark DeGiacomo has served as a two-term member of the Cohasset School 
Committee working diligently since 1998 on behalf of our teachers, administrators and staff, 
coaches, parents, students and community; 

AND WHEREAS Mark DeGiacomo's tireless efforts as Committee Member and Chairperson have 
resulted in a legacy in the renovation and construction of two state of the art learning facilities, the 
creation of a brand new separate middle school as well as new playing fields for boys' baseball and 
girls' Softball; 

AND WHEREAS Mark DeGiacomo's outstanding leadership and fierce advocacy for our schools in 
times of challenge has maintained the community support needed to empower our schools to 
become recognized as one of the finest school systems in the Commonwealth, noted for its 
outstanding MCAS and SAT scores, college placements and scholarly achievements; 

I, THEREFORE, on behalf of the entire school and Cohasset community, offer our deepest 
measure of appreciation and thanks on the day, March 27, 2004, to you, Mark DeGiacomo, for youR 
Incredible loyalty, hard work and unwavering support and dedication to our children and to our 
schools. You will be missed. 

Resolution adopted unanimously. 

Article 8: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VII "Safety and Public Order," of the General Bylaws, 
by adding the following new section entitled "Demolition of Historically Significant Buildings": 



Section 41. Demolition of Historically Significant Buildings 

1. Purpose 

This bylaw is adopted to protect and preserve buildings within the Town which reflect or constitute 
distinctive features of the architectural, cultural, economic, political or social history of the Town and 
to encourage the preservation and restoration rather than demolition of such buildings and 



50 



structures. By furthering these purposes the public interest shall be promoted making the Town a 
more attractive and desirable place in which to live, learn and work, while maintaining the historical 
flavor and diversity of same. To achieve this purpose the Cohasset Historical Commission is 
empowered to advise the Building Inspector with respect to the issuance of permits for Demolition. 
The Commission shall offer its advice to owners of any building within the Town that may fall within 
the terms of this bylaw. 

2. Definitions 

Commission - the Cohasset Historical Commission. 

Demolition - the intentional act of pulling down, destroying, removing, or razing a building or 

commencing the work of total or substantial destruction with intent of completing same. 

Noncontributing - buildings within Districts that are listed by the National Park Service as not 

contributing to the historical value of the District. 

Premises -the parcel of land on which the building is located. 

Regulated buildings - the provisions of this bylaw shall apply only to buildings that satisfy one or 

more of the following criteria: 

a. All buildings listed in the National Register of Historic Places either individually or as 
components of National Register Historic districts in Cohasset, except those officially 
designated as being "noncontributing" buildings. 

b. All buildings listed in the Massachusetts State Register of Historic Places either individually 
or as components of the Massachusetts State Register of Historic Places in Cohasset, 
except those officially designated as being "noncontributing" buildings. 

c. Buildings listed in publication of the Cohasset Bicentennial Committee entitled 'Town of 
Cohasset Heritage Trail" issued 1970, as amended by the Cohasset Historical Society in 
1999 ("the published list"). Copies of the published list shall be on file and available for 
review by members of the public at the office of the Town Clerk and at the Commission's 
office. 

d. Buildings fifty years or more in age having association with a major historic event(s), or 
person(s) important or significant to Cohasset's and/or the region's cultural, economic, 
political or social history and development as may be determined by the Cohasset 
Historical Commission. 

e. Buildings fifty years or more in age that are associated with an important or famous 
architect and/or builder and are representative of their works or are historically or 
architecturally significant in terms of uniqueness, period style, or method of building 
construction as may be determined by the Cohasset Historical Commission. 

f. Buildings fifty years or more in age, though not necessarily individually outstanding 
historically or architecturally, that are significant in one or both those categories within the 
context of their neighborhood, as may be determined by the Cohasset Historical 
Commission. 

3. Procedures 

A. No permit for the demolition of any building or shall be issued other than in conformity with 
this bylaw. Upon receipt of an application for a demolition permit, the Building Inspector 
shall forward a copy of permit to the Commission. 

B. Within thirty (30) business days of receipt of the application from the Building Inspector to 
the Commission, the Commission shall make a determination whether or not the building is 
a "regulated building." If the Commission determines that the building is not regulated by 
this bylaw, it shall sign the permit immediately and forward it to the Building Inspector who 
shall issue the permit, provided it otherwise meets all applicable requirements. 

If the Commission determines that the building is a regulated building, it shall review the 
application for demolition at a public heahng to be held within thirty (30) business days of 
determining that the building is a regulated building. The Commission shall publish a notice 
of the hearing in a newspaper of local circulation during each of the two weeks preceding 



51 



the date of the public hearing, noting the date, location, and subject of the hearing. The 
applicant for the demolition permit shall pay for such notice. The Commission shall provide 
notice of such hearing to the applicant by mail, postage prepaid, at least 14 days before the 
hearing. 

C. No less than ten (10) business days after the public hearing on the demolition permit, the 
Commission shall make its determination and notify the applicant in writing stating its 
reasons with a copy to the Building Inspector. 

D. If a determination is made that the building meets one of the six criteria of a "regulated 
building", the Building Inspector shall not issue a demolition permit for a period of six (6) 
months from the date of notification to the Building Inspector. During this period, the 
applicant is required to make reasonable, good faith efforts to identify alternatives to 
demolition in order to preserve relocate or rehabilitate the building. 

E. If the said building is torn down without the necessary permit, no permit to rebuild or 
construct at the premise will be issued for a period of 3 (three) years. 

F. Nothing in this Section 41 , "Demolition of Historically Significant Buildings" shall prohibit the 
Building Inspector, Board of Health or other legally authorized public official from ordering 
the immediate demolition of any building which is determined to be imminently dangerous 
or unsafe to the public. The Building Inspector, Board of Health or other legally authorized 
public official shall file a copy of any such order of emergency demolition with the 
Commission. 

Moved that the General Bylaws of the Town, Article VII "Safety and Public Order" be hereby 
amended by adding the following new section entitled "Demolition of Historically Significant 
Buildings": 

Section 41. Demolition of Historically Significant Buildings 

1. Purpose 

This bylaw is adopted to protect and preserve buildings within the Town which reflect or constitute 
distinctive features of the architectural, cultural, economic, political or social history of the Town and 
to encourage the preservation and restoration rather than demolition of such buildings and 
structures. By furthering these purposes the public interest shall be promoted, making the Town a 
more attractive and desirable place in which to live, learn and work, while maintaining the historical 
flavor and diversity of same. To achieve this purpose the Cohasset Historical Commission is 
empowered to advise the Building Inspector with respect to the issuance of permits for Demolition. 
The Commission shall offer its advice to owners of any building within the Town that may fall within 
the terms of this bylaw. 

2. Definitions 

Commission - the Cohasset Historical Commission. 

Demolition - the intentional act of pulling down, destroying, removing, or razing a building or 

commencing the work of total or substantial destruction wWh intent of completing same. 

Noncontributing - buildings within Districts that are listed by the National Park Service as not 

contributing to the historical value of the District. 

Premises -the parcel of land on which the building is located. 

Regulated buildings - the provisions of this bylaw shall apply only to buildings that satisfy one or 

more of the following criteria: 

a. All buildings listed in the National Register of Historic Places either individually or as 
components of National Register Historic districts in Cohasset, except those officially 
designated as being "noncontributing" buildings. 

b. All buildings listed in the Massachusetts State Register of Historic Places either individually 
or as components of the Massachusetts State Register of Historic Places in Cohasset, 
except those officially designated as being "noncontributing" buildings. 



52 



c. Buildings listed in publication of the Cohasset Bicentennial Committee entitled "Town of 
Cohasset Heritage Trail" issued 1970, as amended by the Cohasset Historical Society in 
1999 ("the published list"). Copies of the published list shall be on file and available for 
review by members of the public at the office of the Town Clerk and at the Commission's 
office. 

d. Buildings fifty years or more in age having association with a major historic event(s), or 
person(s) important or significant to Cohasset's and/or the region's cultural, economic, 
political or social history and development as may be determined by the Cohasset 
Historical Commission. 

e. Buildings fifty years or more in age that are associated with an important or famous 
architect and/or builder and are representative of their works or are historically or 
architecturally significant in terms of uniqueness, period style, or method of building 
construction as may be determined by the Cohasset Historical Commission. 

f. Buildings fifty years or more in age though not necessarily individually outstanding 
historically or architecturally, that are significant in one or both those categories within the 
context of their neighborhood, as may be determined by the Cohasset Historical 
Commission. 

3. Procedures 

A. No permit for the demolition of any building or shall be issued other than in conformity with 
this bylaw. Upon receipt of an application for a demolition permit, the Building Inspector 
shall forward a copy of permit to the Commission. 

B. Within thirty (30) business days of receipt of the application from the Building Inspector to 
the Commission, the Commission shall make a determination whether or not the building is 
a "regulated building." If the Commission determines that the building is not regulated by 
this bylaw, it shall sign the permit immediately and forward it to the Building Inspector who 
shall issue the permit, provided it otherwise meets all applicable requirements. 

If the Commission determines that the building is a regulated building, it shall review the 
application for demolition at a public hearing to be held within thirty (30) business days of 
determining that the building is a regulated building. The Commission shall publish a notice 
of the hearing in a newspaper of local circulation during each of the two weeks preceding 
the date of the public hearing, noting the date, location, and subject of the hearing. The 
applicant for the demolition permit shall pay for such notice. The Commission shall provide 
notice of such hearing to the applicant by mail, postage prepaid, at least 14 days before the 
hearing. 

C. No less than ten (10) business days after the public hearing on the demolition permit, the 
Commission shall make its determination and notify the applicant in writing stating its 
reasons with a copy to the Building Inspector. 

D. If a determination is made that the building meets one of the six criteria of a "regulated 
building", the Building Inspector shall not issue a demolition permit for a period of six (6) 
months from the date of notification to the Building Inspector. During this period, the 
applicant is required to make reasonable, good faith efforts to identify alternatives to 
demolition in order to preserve, relocate or rehabilitate the building. 

E. If the said building is torn down without the necessary permit, no permit to rebuild or 
construct at the premise will be issued for a period of 3 (three) years. 

F. Nothing in this Section 41, "Demolition of Historically Significant Buildings," shall prohibit 
the Building Inspector, Board of Health or other legally authorized public official from 
ordering the immediate demolition of any building which is determined to be imminently 
dangerous or unsafe to the public. The Building Inspector, Board of Health or other legally 
authorized public official shall file a copy of any such order of emergency demolition with 
the Commission. 

Amendment offered by Peter Pratt. Moved that the Representatives of the Town in the general 
court be requested to seek legislation that would authorize the Building Inspector to enforce the 
following bylaw and the general bylaws of the Town, Article VII "Safety and Public Order" be 



53 



amended by adding the following new section entitled "Demolition of Historically Significant 
Buildings." 

Motion is adopted. 

Leonora Jenkins moved that this article be indefinitely postponed. Hand count taken - Yes 
134; No 63. Motion for postponement adopted. 

Resolution offered by Roseanne McMorris, Chairman of the Board of Selectmen. 

BE IT RESOLVED THAT: 

WHEREAS, Thomas J. Callahan has served for six years as a Selectmen of the Town, and for one 
year as chairman; and 

WHEREAS, Thomas J. Callahan has also served for nine years on the Conservation Commission, 
four years on the Water Resource Protection Committee, one year on the Commission on 
Disabilities, two years on the Drug and Alcohol Committee, two years on the Community 
Preservation Committee, and four years on the Growth and Development Task Force; and 

WHEREAS, the Town of Cohasset acknowledges his contribution towards assisting the Town's 
citizens in the difficult struggle to determine an acceptable balance between their quality of life and 
its cost through taxation; and 

WHEREAS, he has brought insight into the many problems that have faced the Town with his 
ability to solve problems. 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED: 

That the citizens of Cohasset, in Town Meeting assembled, on this 27^ day of March, 2004, 
express their appreciation to Thomas J. Callahan for his active and dedicated interest in the 
promotion of sound Town government to the general welfare of all. 

Resolution adopted unanimously. 

Article 9: 

To see if the Town will amend Section 2 of the Cohasset Zoning Bylaws by inserting the following 
definition: 

"Sign - Political": "Any sign on which a person's candidacy for public office is announced or 

advertised or which expresses the view of the owner or occupant on a 
matter of public concern." 

And, further, that Section 6 "Sign Regulations", subsection 6.1 "Administration", be hereby 
amended by striking 6.1 .1 in its entirety and replacing same with the following: 

"No sign (except a posting or an identification sign, not exceeding two square feet 
in area, or a political sign attached to a residence or in the front yard) shall be 
erected, altered or relocated without a building permit. Permit review shall be 
confined to determining whether the sign conforms to this Bylaw. The Building 
inspector may require a drawing and other pertinent information before issuing a 
permit." 



54 



And, further, that subsection 6.3 be hereby amended by adding a new note 14 as follows: "No sign, 
other than identifying accessory signs, shall be posted or affixed upon any public structure or public 
building, except as may be authorized or required by law." 

And, further, that subsection 6.4 be hereby amended by striking subsection 6.4.1 in its entirety and 
replacing same with the following: "All signs shall be accessory signs except temporary and 
political signs." 

And, further, that subsection 6.4 be hereby amended by striking 6.4.7 in its entirety and replacing 
same with the following: "Political signs posted by the owner or occupant of the property." 

And, further, that subsection 6.4 be hereby amended by adding a new note 8 as follows: 
"Nonaccessory signs are prohibited in residential districts, except as provided for In subsections 
6.4.6 and 6.4.7." 

And, further, that subsection 6.4 be hereby amended by adding a new note 9 as follows: "Any sign, 
the physical condition or appearance of which has substantially deteriorated, shall be removed." 

Moved that Section 2 of the Zoning Bylaw of the Town be hereby amended by inserting the 
following definition: 

"Sign - Political": "Any sign on which a person's candidacy for public office is announced or 

advertised or which expresses the view of the owner or occupant on a 
matter of public concern." 

And, further, that Section 6 "Sign Regulations", subsection 6.1 "Administration", be hereby 
amended by striking 6.1 .1 in its entirety and replacing same with the following: 

"No sign (except a posting or an identification sign, not exceeding two square feet 
in area, or a political sign attached to a residence or in the front yard) shall be 
erected altered or relocated without a building permit. Permit review shall be 
confined to determining whether the sign conforms to this Bylaw. The Building 
Inspector may require a drawing and other pertinent information before issuing a 
permit." 

And, further, that subsection 6.3 be hereby amended by adding a new note 14 as follows: "No sign, 
other than identifying accessory signs, shall be posted or affixed upon any public structure or public 
building, except as may be authorized or required by law." 

And, further, that subsection 6.4 t>e hereby amended by striking subsection 6.4.1 in its entirety and 
replacing same with the following: "All signs shall be accessory signs except temporary and 
political signs." 

And, further, that subsection 6.4 be hereby amended by striking 6.4.7 in its entirety and replacing 
same with the following: "Political signs posted by the owner or occupant of the property." 

And, further, that subsection 6.4 be hereby amended by adding a new note 8 as follows: 
"Nonaccessory signs are prohibited in residential districts, except as provided for in subsections 
6.4.6 and 6.4.7." 

And, further, that subsection 6.4 be hereby amended by adding a new note 9 as follows: "Any sign, 
the physical condition or appearance of which has substantially deteriorated, shall be removed." 

A 2/3's vote required. Motion adopted by the required 2/3's. 

Article 10: 



55 



To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 2.1 of the Cohasset Zoning Bylaws by adding a 
second sentence to the definition of Dwelling Multi-family so that the new definition in entirety shall 
read: "A building containing three or more dwelling units. All housing units permitted by Special 
Permit issued by the Planning Board pursuant to Section 16 "Senior Multi-family Residence Overlay 
District" of the Cohasset Zoning Bylaws, and all housing units permitted by Comprehensive Permit 
issued by the Zoning Board of Appeals pursuant to Chapter 40B of Massachusetts General Laws, 
shall be considered multi-family dwelling units for purposes of the enumeration of both "the total 
number of multi-family dwelling units of any kind erected in Cohasset", and of the "dwelling units of 
the Town", as specified in Section 16.10.3 hereunder; and under Section 16.10 "Further 
Requirements", at Subsection 3, in the first sentence, the number "20%" shall be changed to the 
number "15%". 

Moved that Section 2.1 of the Cohasset Zoning Bylaws be hereby amended by adding a second 
sentence to the definition of Dwelling Multi-family so that the new definition in entirety shall read: "A 
building containing three or more dwelling units. All housing units permitted by Special Permit 
issued by the Planning Board pursuant to Section 16 "Senior Multi-family Residence Overlay 
District" of the Cohasset Zoning Bylaws, and all housing units permitted by Comprehensive Permit 
issued by the Zoning Board of Appeals pursuant to Chapter 40B of Massachusetts General Laws, 
shall be considered multi-family dwelling units for purposes of the enumeration of both "the total 
number of multi-family dwelling units of any kind erected in Cohasset", and of the "dwelling units of 
the Town", as specified in Section 16.10.3 hereunder; and under Section 16.10 "Further 
Requirements", at Subsection 3, in the first sentence, the number "20%" shall be changed to the 
number "15%"'; and under Section 16.10 "Further Requirements", at Subsection 3, add the 
following new last sentence: "Developments and/or projects for which the Board of Selectmen as 
Chief Elected officials of the Town apply to the Department of Housing and Community 
Development for approval under the Local initiative program pursuant to 760 C.M.R. 45.00 et seq., 
shall neither be subject to nor precluded by the 15% limitation stated in this Section 16.10.3. 

Robert Sturdy moved that this article be withdrawn from consideration. Motion is defeated. 
Main motion requires a 2/3's vote. Main motion adopted by the required 2/3's. 

Resolution offered by Susan Kent, Chairwoman of the Advisory Board. 

WHEREAS, Gait Grant has faithfully served the people of the Town of Cohasset as a member of 
the Advisory Committee for the past six years, which is the same position he held thirty years ago; 

WHEREAS, as a member of the Advisory Committee, Gait Grant has been a committed advocate, 
meticulous fact-finder, enthusiastic innovator, a moderating voice of experience, and occasional 
referee; 

WHEREAS, over these many years of service, we have had the benefit of his wisdom, hard work, 
patience and good humor; and 

WHEREAS, over these many years of service, Gait Grant has had one agenda, which is to promote 
and protect the interest of the people of the Town of Cohasset; 

NOW, THEREFORE, be it resolved by the citizens of Cohasset in Town Meeting assembled, on 
this 27*^ day of March 2004, to express our gratitude to Gait Grant and deeply thank him for his 
dedication and devotion to our Town. 

Resolution adopted unanimously 



56 



Article 11: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, and/or borrow, 
pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum or sums of money, with the intention that these funds be 
available in Fiscal Year 2004 and thereafter, to be expended by the Town Manager, in consultation 
with the Board of Sewer Commissioners, for the purpose of developing engineering documents, 
specifications and corresponding cost estimates for the provision of the sewer collection and 
treatment system in the Little Harbor Sewer District and the Atlantic Avenue Sewer District, this 
system specifically intended to serve single and multifamily dwelling units, which existed as of the 
date of the vote of Article 8 of the 2002 Annual Town Meeting, as previously defined and approved. 

Moved that One Hundred Thousand ($100,000.00) Dollars be hereby appropriated, to be expended 
by the Town Manager, for the purpose of developing engineering documents, specifications and 
corresponding cost estimates for the provision of the sewer collection and treatment system in the 
Little Harbor Sewer District and the Atlantic Avenue Sewer District, this system specifically intended 
to serve single and multifamily dwelling units, which existed as of the date of the vote of Article 8, of 
the 2002 Annual Town Meeting, as previously defined and approved; that to fund this appropriation, 
the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow the sum 
of One Hundred Thousand ($100,000.00) Dollars, under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7 of 
the Massachusetts General Laws, as amended, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds 
or notes of the Town, therefore, such borrowing to be general obligations of the Town with the 
intent that such bonds shall be repaid from Sewer Department Revenues. This article is intended 
to take effect upon passage in Fiscal Year 2004. 

A 2/3's vote is required. Motion adopted by the required 2/3's. 

Resolution offered by John McNabb, Chairman of the Water Commission. 

BE IT RESOLVED THAT: 

WHEREAS, Robert Kasameyer has served the Town of Cohasset as a member of the Board of 
Water Commissioners for ten years, from 1994 through 2004; and 

WHEREAS, Robert Kasameyer joined the Water Commission in 1994-1995 helped lead the Water 
Commission out of crisis and disarray by putting the Water Department under contract operations, 
conducting an emergency engineering analysis of the distribution system, and building a new water 
main up Forest Ave. to solve the immediate water crisis; and 

WHEREAS, Robert Kasameyer helped lead the Water Commissioners to develop and implement 
long range plans, rehabilitate the distribution system, build the second water storage tank on 
Scituate Hill, put the Water Department on a firm financial footing, and continue making 
improvements; and 

WHEREAS, Robert Kasameyer on May 8, 2003 accepted the DEPARTMENT Public Water System 
Award for the Cohasset Water Department, which was recognized as one of the top 10% of water 
systems in the state; 

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Town of Cohasset, in Town Meeting assembled 
this twenty-seventh day of March 2004 hereby declare their deep appreciation of the outstanding 
service rendered to the Town of Cohasset by Robert Kasameyer and wish him success in his future 
endeavors. 

Resolution adopted unanimously. 



57 



Article 17: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, and/or borrow 
pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum or sums of money, and to transfer a sum or sums from 
Article 20 of the March 29, 2003 Annual Town Meeting, for the Water Commission to complete 
various water system improvements projects including, but not limited to, improvements to the Lily 
Pond Water Treatment Plant, cleaning and lining water pipes, replacing water pipes, capital 
maintenance, and other improvements to wells, storage tanks and the water distribution system, the 
purchase, acquisition, or taking by eminent domain of property, and other measures to protect the 
sources of public drinking water supply; and that to provide said funding the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized a sum of money and to issued bonds and 
notes of the Town, therefore, such borrowing to be general obligations of the Town with the intent 
that such bonds shall be repaid from Water Department Revenues. 

Moved that Three Million ($3,000,000.00) Dollars be hereby appropriated, with the intention that 
these funds be available in FY 2004 and thereafter, for the Water Commission to complete various 
water system improvement projects including, but not limited to, improvements to the Lily Pond 
Water Treatment Plant, cleaning and lining water pipes, replacing water pipes, capital maintenance, 
and other improvements to wells, storage tanks and the water distribution system, the purchase, 
acquisition, or taking by eminent domain of property, and other measures to protect the sources of 
public drinking water supply; and that to fund the Three Million ($3,000,000.00) Dollars 
appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to 
borrow Three Million ($3,00,000.00) Dollars under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 8 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, as amended, and to issue bonds and notes of the Town, therefore, 
such borrowing to be general obligations of the Town with the intent that such bonds shall be repaid 
from Water Department Revenues. 

A 2/3's vote is required. IVIotion adopted unanimously. 

Article 12: 

To see if the Town will vote to adopt and approve the recommendations of the Community 
Preservation Committee for Fiscal Year 2005, and to see if the Town will vote to implement such 
recommendations by appropriating a sum of money from the Community Preservation Fund 
established pursuant to Chapter 44B of the General Laws, and by authorizing the Board of 
Selectmen, with the approval of the Community Preservation Committee, to acquire, by purchase, 
gift or eminent domain such real property interests in the same of the Town, or enforceable by the 
Town, including real property interests in the form of permanent affordable housing restrictions and 
historical preservation restrictions that will meet the requirements of Chapter 184 of the General 
Laws, as may be necessary or proper to carry out the foregoing. 

Moved that the Town adopt and approve the recommendations of the Community Preservation 
Committee for Fiscal Year 2004 as follows: 

Recommendation A: 

Moved that Fiscal Year 2005 revenues to the Community Preservation Fund be divided to the 
following sub-accounts to be administered by the Community Preservation Committee as follows: 

Moved that One Hundred Sixty Two Thousand Eight Hundred Five ($162,805.00) Dollars be 
transferred from the Community Preservation Fund to the following sub-accounts to be 
administered by the Community Preservation Committee in FY 2005: 

Historical Resources Sub-Account: $ 46,516.00 

Open Space Sub-Account: $46,516.00 

Community Housing Sub-Account: $ 46,516.00 



58 



Administrative Sub-Account: $ 23.257.00 

Total Budget: $162,805.00 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Recommendation B: 

Moved that Forty Six Thousand Five Hundred Sixteen ($46,516.00) Dollars be transferred from the 
Community Preservation Fund Housing Sub-Account and Thirty Three Thousand Four Hundred 
Eighty Four ($33,484.00) Dollars be transferred from the Community Preservation Fund, for a total 
sum of Eighty Thousand ($80,000.00) Dollars, with the intention that these funds be available in FY 
2004 and thereafter, to be expended by the Town Manager, for the purposes of making various 
improvements to the Cohasset Housing Authority 60 Elm Street Apartment Complex. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Recommendation C: 

Moved that Ninety Eight Thousand Five Hundred ($98,500.00) Dollars be transferred from the 
Community Preservation Fund with the Intention that these funds be available in FY 2004 and 
thereafter, to be expended by the Town Manager, for improvements, including but not limited to, the 
installation of drainage structures, to Alumni Field located at the Cohasset Middle High School 
Complex on Pond Street. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Recommendation D: 

Moved that Fifteen Thousand ($15,000.00) Dollars be transferred from the Community 
Preservation Fund with the intention that these funds be available in FY 2004 and thereafter, to be 
expended by the Town Manager, to assist in the construction of a new playground at the site of the 
Paul Pratt Memorial Library Building and the, Our World Children's Discovery Museum located on 
Ripley Road, subject to the condition that this money is to be spent only after Our World Children's 
Discovery Museum demonstrates to the satisfaction of the Town Manager that it has raised 
sufficient funds necessary for the completion of this project. 

Motion adopted. 

Recommendation F: 

Moved that any remaining balance in the Community Preservation Fund in FY 2005 be retained for 
future Community Preservation Committee Recommendations and action by Town Meeting. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

At 5:30 p.m. on motion made and seconded, the Moderator adjourned the meeting to Monday, 
March 29, 2004 at 7 p.m. at the Cohasset High School Sullivan Gym. 

Monday. March 29. 2004 

The Town Clerk appointed checkers and the Moderator appointed tellers. The Moderator called the 
meeting to order at 7:25 p.m. and a quorum of 100 was present at that time. The registered voters 
checked in on the voting list totaled Pre. 1 - 80; Pre. 2 - 71 ; for a total of 1 51 . 

Recommendation E: 



59 



Moved that Eight Hundred Thousand ($800,000.00) Dollars be hereby appropriated, with the 
intention that these funds be available in FY 2004 and thereafter, to be expended by the Town 
Manager to supplement the amount requested under Article 13 of this Town Meeting Warrant to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by purchase, gift, or eminent domain taking all or a 
portion of the following parcels of land found on Assessor's Map 65: Parcel 6 (described by deed 
recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 17101 Page 85); Parcel 7 (described by deed 
recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 15452 Page 553); Parcel 8 (described by deed 
recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 5124 Page 647); Parcel 9 (described by deed 
recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 5204 Page 388); Parcel 10 (described by deed 
recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 5572 Page 170); Parcel 18 and Parcel 20 
(described by deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 2115 Page 412) and on 
Assessor's Map 66: Parcel 1 ; Parcel 2; Parcel 4; Parcel 5 (described by deed recorded in Norfolk 
County Registry of Deeds Book 4778 Page 572); Parcel 6; Parcel 7 (described by deed recorded in 
Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 5244 Page 104). All the property is to be acquired in fee 
simple title for watershed, open space and recreation purposes; that to fund this Eight Hundred 
Thousand ($800,000.00) Dollar appropriation. One Hundred Thirty Five Thousand ($135,000.00) 
Dollars is transferred from the Community Preservation Fund Open Space Sub Account; Two 
Hundred Sixty Five Thousand ($265,000.00) Dollars is transferred from the Community 
Preservation Fund; and that the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, borrow the 
sum of Four Hundred Thousand ($400,000.00) Dollars under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7 
of the Massachusetts General Laws, as amended, or any other enabling authority, and to issue 
bonds or notes of the Town, therefore, as general obligations of the Town with the intent that the 
principal and interest payments are to be paid each year from the Community Preservation Fund 
Open Space Account, subject to the following conditions: 

1. That no more than Four Hundred Thousand ($400,000.00) Dollars may be spent on the 
acquisitions of the so-called "James Property" (Assessors' Map 65, Parcel 18, described by 
deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 2115, Page 412); 

2. That the contribution of the Community Preservation Funds to purchase the remaining lots 
does not exceed fifty-seven (57%) percent of the purchase price of each lot; 

3. That the Town grant a conservation restriction to the Trustees of Reservations requiring 
that this land be used only for watershed, open space and recreation purposes. 

A 2/3's vote required. Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 13: 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen, Board of Water Commissioners or 
the Conservation Commission as the Town may determine, to acquire by purchase, gift, or eminent 
domain taking all or a portion of the following parcels of land found on Assessor's Map 65: Parcel 6 
(described by deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 17101 page 85); Parcel 7 
(described by deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 15452 Page 553); Parcel 8 
(described by deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 5124 Page 647); Parcel 9 
(described by deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 5204 Page 388); Parcel 10 
(described by deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 5572 page 170); Parcel 18 
and Parcel 20 (described by deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 2115 Page 
412) and on Assessor's Map 66: Parcel 1; Parcel 2; Parcel 4; Parcel 5 (described by deed 
recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds book 4778 page 572); Parcel 6; Parcel 7 (described 
by deed recorded Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 5244 Page 104); Parcel 13 (described by 
deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 5042 page 447) and Parcel 14 (described 
by deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 2037 Page 45) and on Assessor's Map 
67, Parcel 001, and on Assessor's Map 72, Parcels 001 and 002 (described by deed recorded in 



60 



Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 10470 Page 210). All the property is to be acquired in fee 
simple title for watershed and open space purposes. This article is intended to take effect upon 
passage in Fiscal Year 2004. 

Moved to authorize the Board of Selectmen, to acquire by purchase, gift, or eminent domain taking 
all or a portion of the following parcels of land found on Assessor's Map 65: Parcel 6 (described by 
deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 17101 Page 85); Parcel 7 (described by 
deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 15452 Page 553); Parcel 8 (described by 
deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 5124 Page 647); Parcel 9 (described by 
deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 5204 Page 388); Parcel 10 (described by 
deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 5572 Page 170); Parcel 18 and Parcel 20 
(described by deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 2115 Page 412) and on 
Assessor's Map 66: Parcel 1 ; Parcel 2; Parcel 4; Parcel 5 (described by deed recorded in Norfolk 
County Registry of Deeds Book 4778 Page 572); Parcel 6; Parcel 7 (described by deed recorded in 
Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 5244 Page 104). All the property is to be acquired in fee 
simple title for watershed, open space and recreation purposes. This article is intended to take 
effect upon passage in Fiscal Year 2004. 

A 2/3's vote required. Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 14: 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Water Commissioners to acquire by purchase, 
gift, or eminent domain taking all or part of the following parcels of land: As found on Assessor's 
map 56: Parcels 14, 16 and 16A on Doane Street (described by deed recorded In Norfolk County 
Registry of Deeds Book 11406 page 161); Parcel 15 on Doane Street (described by deed recorded 
in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 8972 Page 726); Parcel 12 on Beechwood Street 
(described by deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 2554 Page 502); Parcel 13 
on Doane Street (described by deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 4629 
Page 514); Parcel 17 on East Doane Street (described by deed recorded in Norfolk County 
Registry of Deeds Book 2833 Page 244); on Assessor's Map 54: Parcels 24 and 25 on Beechwood 
Street (described by deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 8526 page 35); and 
the tract bounded westerly by the boundary line of Wompatuck State Park beginning at its 
intersection with Old Road then southeasterly and southerly to its intersection with Doane Street, 
southerly along the northern boundaries of the Assessor's Map 56 Parcels 58-001, 16A, 16 and 15, 
and Assessor's Map 54 Parcel 22; easterly by Assessor's Map 54 Parcels 22, 36, 34, 26, 33, 32, 24 
and 25; northeasterly by Assessor's Map 54 Parcel 9; southeasterly by Assessor's Map 54 Parcel 
9; northeasterly by a parcel marked "n/a: and by Assessor' Map 60 Parcels 9 and 10; and 
northwesterly by "Old Road" shown on Assessor's Map 66. All the property is to be acquired in fee 
simple title for all purposes which the Board of Water Commissioners may hold property and further 
that this article is intended to take effect upon passage in Fiscal Year 2004. 



Moved to authorize the Board of Water Commissioners to acquire by purchase, gift, or eminent 
domain taking all or part of the following parcels of land: As found on Assessors' Map 60, Parcels 9 
and 10; Assessors' Map 59: Parcel 11 on King Street and Parcel 12 on King Street (described by 
deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds, Book 6228 Page 343); on Assessors' Map 56: 
Parcels 14, 16 and 16A on Doane Street (described by deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of 
Deeds Book 11406 page 161); Parcel 15 on Doane Street (described by deed recorded in Norfolk 
County Registry of Deeds Book 8972 Page 726); Parcel 12 on Beechwood Street (described by 
deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 2554 Page 502); Parcel 13 on Doane 
Street (described by deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 4629 Page 514); 
Parcel 1 7 on East Doane Street (described by deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds 



61 



Book 2833 Page 244); on Assessors' Map 54: Parcels 24 and 25 on Beechwood Street (described 
by deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 8526 Page 35); Parcel 33 on 
Riverview Drive (described by deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 6306 Page 
724); and the tract bounded westerly by the boundary line of Wompatuck State Park beginning at 
its intersection with Old Road then southeasterly and southerly to its intersection with Doane Street; 
southerly along the northern boundaries of the Assessor's Map 56 Parcels 58-001, 16A, 16 and 15, 
and Assessors' Map 54 Parcel 22; easterly by Assessors' Map 54 Parcels 22, 36, 34, 26, 33, 32, 24 
and 25; northeasterly by Assessors' Map 54 Parcel 9; southeasterly by Assessors' Map 54 Parcel 
9; northeastedy by a Parcel marked "n/a" and by Assessors' Map 60 Parcels 9 and 10; and 
northwesterly by "Old Road" shown on Assessors' Map 66. All the property is to be acquired in fee 
simple title for all purposes which the Board of Water Commissioners may hold property and further 
that this article is intended to take effect upon passage in Fiscal Year 2004. 

A 2/3's vote required. Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 15: 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Water Commissioners to acquire by purchase, 
gift, or eminent domain taking the parcel of land described on Assessor's Map 54 as Parcel 19 and 
more particularly described in the deed record in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 8642 
Page 58. All the property shall be acquired in fee simple title for all purposed for which the Board of 
Water Commissioners may hold property and further that this article is intended to take effect upon 
passage in Fiscal Year 2004. 

Moved to authorize the Board of Water Commissioners to acquire by purchase, gift, or eminent 
domain taking the parcel of land described on Assessor's Map 54 as Parcel 19 and more 
particularly described in the deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 8642 Page 
58. All the property shall be acquired in fee simple title for all purposes for which the Board of 
Water Commissioners may hold property and further that this article is intended to take effect upon 
passage in Fiscal Year 2004. 

A 2/3's vote required. Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 16: 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by purchase, gift, or 
eminent domain taking the fee simple title in the property now known as Old Road together with any 
and all private rights of passage as may exist over said Old Road. Said Old Road is shown as "Old 
Road - Laid Out in 1670-72 on Assessor's Maps 59, 60, 61, 65, 66, 67, and 69. This article is 
intended to take effect upon passage in Fiscal Year 2004. 

Moved to authorize the Board of Water Commissioners to acquire by purchase, gift, or eminent 
domain taking the fee simple title in the property now known as Old Road together with any and all 
private rights of passage as may exist over said Old Road. Said Old Road is shown as "Old Road - 
Laid Out in 1670-72" on Assessors' Maps 59, 60, 61, 65, 66, 67, and 69. This article is intended to 
take effect upon passage in Fiscal Year 2004. 

A 2/3's vote required. Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 18: 

To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum or sums of money for the construction of 
improvements to the Water Distribution System, Wellfields, and to the Lily Pond Water Treatment 
Plant, and for construction of Stormwater Best Management Practices in the watershed of the 
public drinking water supply and to determine whether this appropriation shall be raised by 



62 



borrowing from the Massachusetts Water Pollution Abatement Trust or otherwise, and further that 
this article is intended to take effect upon passage in Fiscal Year 2004. 



Moved that Twenty One Million Six Hundred Eighty Two Thousand One Hundred Ninety 
($21,682,190.00) Dollars be hereby appropriated for the construction of improvements to the Water 
Distribution System, Wellfields, and Lily Pond Water Treatment Plant, and for construction of 
Stormwater Best Management practices in the watershed of the public drinking water supply; that to 
fund this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby 
authorized to borrow Twenty One Million Six Hundred Eighty Two Thousand One Hundred Ninety 
($21,682,190.00) Dollars under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 8 of the Massachusetts 
General Laws, as amended, and/or Chapter 29C of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other 
enabling authority, and to issue bonds and notes of the Town, therefore, such borrowing to be 
general obligations of the Town with the intent that such bonds shall be repaid from Water 
Department Revenues; that the Treasurer with the approval of the Board of Selectmen is 
authorized to borrow all or a portion of such amount from the Massachusetts Water Pollution 
Abatement Trust established pursuant to Chapter 29C, as amended; and in connection therewith to 
enter into a loan agreement and/or security agreement with the Trust and otherwise to contract with 
the Trust and the Department of Environmental Protection with respect to such loan and for any 
federal or state aid available for the project or for the financing thereof; and further that this article is 
intended to take effect upon passage in Fiscal Year 2004. 

A 2/3's vote required. Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 19: 

To see if the Town will vote to request its representatives in the General Court to introduce 
legislation to authorize representatives in the General Court to introduce legislation to authorize the 
Water Department to provide water service to customers outside the Town of Cohasset for periods 
of up to forty years or take any other action related thereto and to authorize the Board of Water 
Commissioners to make constructive changes in perfecting the language of this legislation in order 
to secure its passage, it being the intent to authorize the General Court with the approval of the 
Board of Water Commissioners to modify the specific text of the requested legislation to secure the 
public policy objectives set forth herein, such legislation to read substantially as set forth below. 

AN ACT TO AUTHORIZE THE TOWN OF COHASSET WATER COMMISSION TO CONTRACT 
FOR THE SALE OF WATER FOR FORTY YEARS 

Section 1 . Section 2 of Chapter 128 of the Acts of 1886, as amended by section 1 of Chapter 

489 of the Acts of 1946 and as further amended by Chapter 436 of the Acts of 
1998, is further amended in the sentence that reads "Any such contracts may be 
for a period not to exceed twenty years" by striking the word "twenty" and inserting 
in place thereof the word "forty." 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon passage. 

and further that this article is intended to take effect upon passage in Fiscal Year 2004. 

Moved to amend the last sentence of Section 10(f) of Article III of the General Bylaws by striking 
the word "twenty" and inserting in its place thereof the word "forty" and further moved to request the 
Town's representatives in the General Court to introduce legislation to authorize the Water 
Department to provide water service to customers outside the Town of Cohasset for periods of up 
to forty years or take any other action related thereto and to authorize the Board of Water 
Commissioners to make constructive changes in perfecting the language of this legislation in order 
to secure its passage, it being the intent to authorize the General Court with the approval of the 



63 



Board of Water Commissioners to modify the specific text of the requested legislation to secure the 
public policy objectives set forth herein, such legislation to read substantially as set forth below. 

AN ACT TO AUTHORIZE THE TOWN OF COHASSET WATER COMMISSION TO CONTRACT 
FOR THE SALE OF WATER FOR FORTY YEARS 

Section 1. Section 2 of Chapter 128 of the Acts of 1886, as amended by section 1 of Chapter 

489 of the Acts of 1946 and as further amended by Chapter 436 of the Acts of 
1998, is further amended in the sentence that reads "Any such contracts may be 
for a period not to exceed twenty years" by striking the word "twenty" and inserting 
in place thereof the word "forty." 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon passage. 

and further that this article is intended to take effect upon passage in Fiscal Year 2004. 

Amendment offered by Gary Vanderwell. Amend Article 19 as follows: Wherever the word 
"forty" or the words "forty years" appear, add immediately after such work or words the phrase "with 
the approval of Town Meeting. 

Additional amendment offered by Gary Vanderwell. After the words "with the approval of Town 
Meeting" except emergencies shall not require Town Meeting approval. 

Additional amendment is adopted. Original amendment as amended was a hand count. Yes 78; 
No 41. Motion adopted. Moved by Glenn Pratt that this article be indefinitely postponed. 
Motion adopted. 

Article 20: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, and/or borrow, a 
sum or sums of money, with the intention that these funds be available in FY 2004 and thereafter, 
to be expended by the Town Manager, to pay the Town of Cohasset's share, in conjunction with 
funds from the Towns of Hingham and Hull^ for the engineering design and study to replace the 
West Corner Culvert located on Route 228 at the Hingham, Hull and Cohasset town line. 

Moved that Twenty Five Thousand ($25,000.00) be hereby appropriated, with the intention that 
these funds be available in FY 2004 and thereafter, to be expended by the Town Manager, to pay 
the Town of Cohasset's share, in conjunction with funds from the Towns of Hingham and Hull, for 
the engineering design and study to replace the West Corner Culvert located on Route 228 at the 
Hingham, Hull and Cohasset town line; that to fund this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow Twenty Five Thousand 
($25,000.00) Dollars under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7 of the Massachusetts General 
Laws, as amended, and to issue bonds and notes of the Town, therefore. 

A 2/3's vote required. Motion adopted unanimously. 



64 



Article 21: 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize improvements, pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Section 6N, to the private way off of Atlantic Avenue that services several homes 
commonly known as "Newtonville", and to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, 
and/or borrow, pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum or sums of money, with the intention that 
these funds be available in FY 2004 and thereafter, to be expended by the Town Manager, for said 
improvements, including drainage, which borrowing is to be repaid by betterments assessed upon 
the properties benefited thereby. 

Moved to authorize improvements, pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 
6N, to the private way off of Atlantic Avenue that services several homes commonly known as 
"Newtonville", and that One Hundred Thousand ($100,000.00) Dollars be hereby appropriated, with 
the intention that these funds be available in FY 2004 and thereafter, to be expended by the Town 
Manager, for said improvements, including drainage; that to fund this appropriation, the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow One Hundred 
Thousand ($100,000.00) Dollars under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7 of the Massachusetts 
General Laws, as amended, and to issue bonds and notes of the Town, therefore, which borrowing 
is to be repaid by betterments assessed upon the properties benefited thereby. 

A 2/3'$ vote required. Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 22: 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by purchase, gift or 
eminent domain, an additional easement in James Lane, said additional easement comprising of 
approximately 1,310 square feet, all as shown on a plan entitled "Site Plan, James Lane, Cohasset, 
MA 02025", dated December 29, 2003, and prepared by John Cavanaro Consulting, 179 CJC 
Highway, Cohasset, MA 02025, which plan is on file in the Office of the Town Clerk, and to raise 
and appropriate, transfer from available funds, and/or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute, a 
sum or sums of money, to be expended by the Town Manager, with the intention that these funds 
be available in FY 2004 and thereafter, with the intention that these funds be available in Fiscal 
Year 2004 and thereafter, to be expended by the Town Manager for this purpose. 



Moved to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by purchase, gift or eminent domain, an 
additional easement in James Lane, said additional easement comprising of approximately 1,310 
square feet, all as shown on a plan entitled "Site Plan, James Lane, Cohasset, MA 02025", dated 
December 29, 2003, and prepared by John Cavanaro Consulting, 179 CJC Highway, Cohasset, MA 
02025, which plan is on file in the Office of the Town Clerk, and that Sixty Four Thousand Two 
Hundred ($64,200.00) Dollars is hereby appropriated, with the intention that these funds be 
available in FY 2004 and thereafter, to be expended by the Town Manager, for this purpose, that to 
fund this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby 
authorized to borrow Sixty Four Thousand Two Hundred ($64,200.00) Dollars under and pursuant 
to Chapter 44, Section 7 of the Massachusetts General Laws, as amended, and to issue bonds and 
notes of the Town, therefore. 

A 2/3's vote required. Motion adopted unanimously. 



65 



Article 23: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, and/or borrow 
pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum or sums of money, to be expended by the Town 
Manager, for the purpose of providing the Town's fifty (50%) percent share of the cost for the 
engineering design and development of bid specifications for improvements to the sea wall 
between the Mill River Marina and the Atlantica Restaurant on Border Street. The article is 
intended to take effect upon passage in Fiscal Year 2004. 

Moved that Twenty Five Thousand ($25,000.00) Dollars be transferred from Overlay Surplus, to be 
expended by the Town Manager, for the purpose of providing the Town's fifty (50%) percent share 
of the cost for the engineering design and development of bid specifications for improvements to 
the sea wall between the Mill River Marina and the Atlantica Restaurant on Border Street. The 
article is intended to take effect upon passage in Fiscal Year 2004. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 24: 

To see if the Town will vote in accordance with Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 59, Section 
5, Clause 41 C, to increase the Gross Receipts Limit to $18,000.00 for a single person and 
$23,000.00 for a married couple, and to increase the Whole Estate Limit to $33,000.00 for a single 
person and $35,000.00 for a married couple. 

Moved that in furtherance of elderly tax exemption and relief from property taxes, in accordance 
with Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 41 C, to increase the Gross 
Receipts Limit to $18,000.00 for a single person and $23,000.00 for a married couple, and to 
increase the Whole Estate Limit to $33,000.00 for a single person and $35,000.00 for a married 
couple. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 25: 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the General Court of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts to enact a special act (i) authorizing the Town to issue the bonds 
authorized by the Town by votes of the Town passed under Article 4 of the Warrant for the 
December 6, 1999 Special Town Meeting and under Article 13 of the Warrant for the March 25, 
2000 Annual Town Meeting in the total amount of $42,190,000.00, to renovate, reconstruct, make 
extraordinary changes, furnish, and pay for the architectural fees, and all other related costs, to the 
Deer Hill School and Middle/High School for the creation of additional space, handicapped 
accessibility, and to meet the educational specifications established by the Cohasset School 
Committee, for a period of not more than 23 years without regard to the term of any temporary 
loans incurred in anticipation of the bonds; (ii) providing that the first principal payment with respect 
to such bonds need not be made until 4 years from the date of the bonds; and (ill) providing how 
interest with respect to the bonds, and any temporary loans incurred in anticipation thereof, shall be 
treated for the purpose of computing the amount of any state school facilities or similar grant to be 
received with respect to the school projects. 



66 



Moved that the Town request its representatives in the General Court to introduce legislation (i) 
authorizing the Town to issue the bonds authorized by the Town by votes of the Town passed 
under Article 4 of the Warrant for the for the December 6, 1999 Special Town Meeting and under 
Article 13 of the Warrant for the March 25, 2000 Annual Town Meeting in the total amount of 
$42,190,000.00, to renovate, reconstruct, make extraordinary changes, furnish, and pay for the 
architectural fees, and all other related costs, to the Deer Hill School and Middle/High School for the 
creation of additional space, handicapped accessibility, and to meet the educational specifications 
established by the Cohasset School Committee, for a period of not more than 23 years without 
regard to the term of any temporary loans incurred in anticipation of the bonds; (ii) providing that 
the first principal payment with respect to such bonds need not be made until 4 years from the date 
of the bonds; and (iii) providing how interest with respect to the bonds, and any temporary loans 
incurred in anticipation thereof, shall be treated for the purpose of computing the amount of any 
state school facilities or similar grant to be received with respect to the school projects, and to 
authorize the General Court, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to modify the specific text 
of the requested legislation to secure the public policy objectives set forth herein, such legislation to 
read substantially as set forth below: 

AN ACT RELATIVE TO THE ISSUANCE OF CERTAIN BONDS BY THE TOWN OF 
COHASSET 

Section 1. Notwithstanding the provisions of any general or special law to the contrary, the 

Town of Cohasset is authorized to issue the bonds authorized by the Town by 
votes of the Town passed under Article 4 of the Warrant for the December 6, 1999 
Special Town Meeting and under Article 13 of the Warrant for the March 25, 2000 
Annual Town Meeting in the total amount of $42,190,000.00, to renovate, 
reconstruct, make extraordinary changes, furnish and pay for the architectural fees, 
and all other related costs, to the Deer Hill Elementary School and Middle/High 
School for the creation of additional space, handicapped accessibility, and to meet 
the educational specifications established by the Cohasset School Committee, for 
a period of not more than 23 years. The first payment of principal with respect to 
the bonds shall be made not later than 4 years after the date thereof and the period 
during which the bonds maybe outstanding shall not exceed 19 years from the date 
of the first principal payment date with respect to the bonds and shall not be 
reduced by the terms of any temporary loan or loans issued in anticipation of the 
bonds. For the purposes of computing the amount of any state school facilities or 
similar grant to be received by the Town with respect to the projects to be financed 
with the proceeds of the bonds pursuant to Chapter 70B of the General Laws, or 
otherwise, the final approval cost of such projects shall include all interest 
incurred by the Town with respect to any temporary loan or loans issued in 
anticipation of the bonds, but shall not include interest incurred by the Town with 
respect to the bonds for the period from the date of the bonds to the date one year 
prior to the date of the first principal payment due with respect to the bonds. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Amendment offered by Lee Jenkins. To substitute the amount of $25,314,000 in place of 
$42.190.000. Amendment defeated . Motion Is adopted. 



67 



Article 26: 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, 
Section 57, as amended, entitled "Local licenses and permits; denial, revocation or suspension for 
failure to pay municipal taxes or charges", which reads as follows: 

"Any city or town which accepts the provisions of this section, may by bylaw or ordinance deny any 
application for, or revoke or suspend a building permit, or any local license or permit including 
renewals and transfers issued by any board, officer, department for any person, corporation or 
business enterprise, who has neglected or refused to pay any local taxes, fees, assessments, 
betterments or any other municipal charges, including amounts assessed under the provisions of 
section twenty-one D or with respect to any activity, event or other matter which is the subject of 
such license or permit and which activity, event or matter is carried out or exercised or is to be 
carried out or exercised on or about real estate whose owner has neglected or refused to pay any 
local taxes, fees, assessments, betterments or any other municipal charges. Such bylaw or 
ordinances shall provide that: 



(a) The tax collector or other municipal official responsible for records of all municipal taxes, 
assessments, betterments and other municipal charges, hereinafter referred to as the tax 
collector, shall annually furnish to each department, board, commission or division, 
hereinafter referred to as the licensing authority, that issues licenses or permits including 
renewals and transfers a list of any person, corporation, or business enterprise, 
hereinafter referred to as the party, that has neglected or refused to pay any local taxes, 
fees, assessments, betterments or other municipal charges for not less than a twelve 
month period, and that such party has not filed in good faith a pending application for an 
abatement of such tax or a pending petition before the appellate tax board. 

(b) The licensing authority may deny, revoke or suspend any license or permit, including 
renewals and transfers of any party whose name appears, on said list furnished to the 
licensing authority from the tax collector or with respect to any activity, event or other 
matter which is the subject of such license or permit and which activity, event or matter is 
carried out or exercised or is to be carried out or exercised on or about real estate owned 
by any party whose name appears on said list furnished to the licensing authority from the 
tax collector; provided, however, that written notice is given to the party and the tax 
collector, as required by applicable provisions of law, and the party is given a hearing, to 
be held not earlier than fourteen days after said notice. Said list shall be prima facie 
evidence for denial, revocation or suspension of said license or permit to any party. The 
tax collector shall have the right to intervene in any hearing conducted with respect to 
such license denial, revocation or suspension. Any findings made by the licensing 
authority with respect to such license denial, revocation or suspension shall be made only 
for the purpose of such proceeding and shall not be relevant to or introduced in any other 
proceeding at law, except for any appeal from such license denial, revocation or 
suspension. Any license or permit denied, suspended or revoked under this section shall 
not be reissued or renewed until the license authority receives a certificate issued by the 
tax collector that the party is in good standing with respect to any and all local taxes, fees, 
assessments, betterments or other municipal charges, payable to the municipality as the 
date of issuance of said certificate. 

(c) Any party may be given an opportunity to enter into a payment agreement, thereby 
allowing the licensing authority to issue a certificate indicating said limitations to the 
license or permit and the validity of said license shall be conditioned upon the satisfactory 
compliance with said agreement. Failure to comply with said agreement shall be grounds 



68 



for the suspension or revocation of said license or permit; provided, however, that the 
holder be given notice and a hearing as required by applicable provisions of law. 
(d) The Board of Selectmen may waive such denial, suspension or revocation if it finds there 
is no direct or indirect business interest by the property owner, its officers or stockholders, 
if any, or members of his immediate family, as defined in section one of chapter two 
hundred and sixty-eight A in the business or activity conducted in or on said property. 

This section shall not apply to the following licenses and permits: open burning; section thirteen of 
chapter forty-eight, bicycle permits; section eleven A of chapter eighty-five; sales of articles for 
charitable purposes, section thirty-three of chapter one hundred and one; children work permits, 
section sixty-nine of chapter one hundred and forty-nine; clubs, associations dispensing food or 
beverage licenses, section twenty-one E or chapter one hundred and forty; dog licenses, section 
one hundred and thirty-seven of chapter one hundred and forty, fishing, hunting, trapping license, 
section twelve of chapter one hundred and thirty-one; marriage licenses, section twenty-eight of 
chapter two hundred and seven and theatrical events, public exhibition permits, section one 
hundred and eighty-one of chapter one hundred and forty. A city or town may exclude any local 
license or permit from this section by bylaw or ordinance." 

And, further, to see if the Town will vote to amend Article VII, "Safety and Public Order:, of the 
General Bylaws, by adding the following new section entitled "Licenses and Permits; Collections": 

Section 42. Licenses and Permits; Collections 

1. Procedure 

The Town licensing authority may deny, revoke or suspend any license or permit, including 
renewals and transfers of any party whose name appears on the list furnished to the 
licensing authority from the Tax Collector or with respect to any activity, event or other 
matter which is the subject of such license or permit and which activity, event or matter is 
carried out or exercised or is be carried out or exercised on or about real estate owned by 
any party whose name appears on said list furnished to the licensing authority from the 
Collector; provided, however, that written notice is given the party and the Collector, as 
required by applicable provisions of law, and the party is given a hearing, to be held not 
earlier than 14 days after said notice. Said list shall be prima facie evidence for denial, 
revocation or suspension of said license or permit to any party. The Collector shall have 
the hght to intervene in any hearing conducted with respect to such license denial, 
revocation or suspension. Any findings made by the Town licensing authority shall be 
made only for the purposes of such proceeding and shall not be relevant to or introduced in 
any other proceeding at law, except for any appeal from such license denial, revocation or 
suspension. Any license or permit denied, suspended or revoked under this section shall 
not be reissued or renewed until the license authority receives certificate issued by the 
Collector that the party is in good standing with respect to any and all local taxes, fees, 
assessments, betterments or other municipal charges, payable to the municipality as of the 
day of issuance of said certificate. 

2. Payment Agreements 

Any party so owing such tax, fee, assessment, betterment or other municipal charge may 
be given an opportunity to enter into a payment agreement, thereby allowing the licensing 
authority to issue a certificate indicating said limitations to the license or permit, and the 
validity of said license shall be conditioned upon the satisfactory compliance with said 
agreement. Failure to comply with said agreement shall be grounds for the suspension or 
revocation of said license or permit; provided, however, that the holder be given notice and 
a hearing as required by applicable provisions of law. 

3. Waivers 



69 



The Board of Selectmen may waive such denial, suspension or revocation if it finds there is 
no direct of indirect business interest by the property owner, its officers or stockholders, if 
any, or members of his immediate family, as defined in MGL, c. 268A, § 1, in the business 
or activity in or on said property. 

4. Applicability and Exemptions 

This article shall apply to all licenses and permits issued by any Town of Cohasset board, 
commission or officer, including, to the extent allowed by applicable law, building permits, 
certificates of appropriateness, orders of conditions, septic system permits, sewer permits, 
zoning variances and special permits, but excluding the following licenses and permits: 

A. All licenses and permits exempted by MGL, c. 40, § 57; 

B. Open Burning, MGL, c. 48, § 13; 

C. Sales of Articles for Charitable Purposes, MGL, c. 1 01 , § 33; 

D. Children Work Permits, MGL, c. 149, § 69; 

E. Clubs, associations dispensing food or beverage licenses, MGL, c. 140, § 21 E; 

F. Dog Licenses, MGL, c. 140, § 137; 

G. Fishing, hunting, trapping license, MGL, c. 131, § 12; and 
H. Marriage Licenses, MGL, c. 207, § 28 

Moved to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 57, as 
amended, entitled "Local licenses and permits; denial, revocation or suspension for failure to pay 
municipal taxes or charges", and, further, that the General Bylaws of the Town, Article VII 
"Safety and Public Order" be hereby amended by adding the following new section entitled 
"Licenses and Permits; Collections": 

Section 41. Licenses and Permits; Collections 

1. Procedure 

The Town licensing authority may deny, revoke or suspend any license or permit, including 
renewals and transfers of any party whose name appears on the list furnished to the 
licensing authority from the Tax Collector or with respect to any activity, event or other 
matter which is the subject of such license or permit and which activity, event or matter is 
carried out or exercised or is be carried out or exercised on or about real estate owned by 
any party whose name appears on said list furnished to the licensing authority from the 
Collector; provided, however, that written notice is given the party and the Collector, as 
required by applicable provisions of law, and the party is given a hearing, to be held not 
earlier than 14 days after said notice. Said list shall be prima facie evidence for denial, 
revocation or suspension of said license or permit to any party. The Collector shall have 
the right to intervene in any hearing conducted with respect to such license denial, 
revocation or suspension. Any findings made by the Town licensing authority shall be 
made only for the purposes of such proceeding and shall not be relevant to or introduced in 
any other proceeding at law, except for any appeal from such license denial, revocation or 
suspension. Any license or permit denied, suspended or revoked under this section shall 
not be reissued or renewed until the license authority receives certificate issued by the 
Collector that the party is in good standing with respect to any and all local taxes, fees, 
assessments, betterments or other municipal charges, payable to the municipality as of the 
day of issuance of said certificate. 

2. Payment Agreements 

Any party so owing such tax, fee, assessment, betterment or other municipal charge may 
be given an opportunity to enter into a payment agreement, thereby allowing the licensing 



70 



authority to issue a certificate indicating said limitations to the license or permit, and the 
validity of said license shall be conditioned upon the satisfactory compliance with said 
agreement. Failure to comply with said agreement shall be grounds for the suspension or 
revocation of said license or permit; provided, however, that the holder be given notice and 
a hearing as required by applicable provisions of law. 

3. Waivers 

The Board of Selectmen may waive such denial, suspension or revocation if it finds there is 
no direct of indirect business interest by the property owner, its officers or stockholders, if 
any, or members of his immediate family, as defined in MGL, c. 268A, § 1, in the business 
or activity in or on said property. 

4. Applicability and Exemptions 

This article shall apply to all licenses and permits issued by any Town of Cohasset board, 
commission or officer, including, to the extent allowed by applicable law, building permits, 
certificates of appropriateness, orders of conditions, septic system permits, sewer permits, 
zoning variances and special permits, but excluding the following licenses and permits: 

A. All licenses and permits exempted by MGL, c. 40, § 57; 

B. Open Burning, MGL, c. 48, § 13; 

C. Sales of Articles for Charitable Purposes, MGL, c. 101 , § 33; 

D. Children Work Permits, MGL, c. 149, § 69; 

E. Clubs, associations dispensing food or beverage licenses, MGL, c. 140, § 21 E; 

F. Dog Licenses, MGL, c. 140, § 137; 

G. Fishing, hunting, trapping license, MGL, c. 131, § 12; and 
H. Marriage Licenses, MGL, c. 207, § 28 

Amendment offered by Kevin O'Donnell. Moved to add under 4. Applicability and Exemptions 
the letter I. Firearm license c. M.G.L. c.140 § 31. Motion to amend is adopted. Main motion 
as amended is adopted unanimously. 

Article 27: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VII, "Safety and Public Order" of the General Bylaws 
("the Bylaws") as follows: 

By deleting the second to last sentence in Section 40 of the Bylaws which sentence states: 
"Building Permits may be appealed to the Board of Appeals" so that the revised Section 40 will read 
as follows: 

Each week, the Office of the Building Commissioner shall cause to be published, in a newspaper of 
general circulation in Cohasset, a list of all Building Permits issued during the previous week, 
except those issued for interior alterations and re-roofing. The list shall include the name or names 
of the applicant or applicants, the address of the property, the date the Permit was issued, a brief 
description of the proposed construction or operations and the statement: "An appeal to the Board 
of Appeals may be taken by any person aggrieved by an order or decision of the Building 
Commissioner in violation of any provision of the Zoning Act, Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 40A, §1 et seq., or the Town's Zoning Bylaws." 

Moved that the General Bylaws of the Town, Article VII "Safety and Public Order" be hereby 
amended as follows: 

By deleting the second to last sentence in Section 40 of the Bylaws which sentence states: 
"Building Permits may be appealed to the Board of Appeals" so that the revised Section 40 will read 



71 



as 



follows: 



Each week, the Office of the Building Commissioner shall cause to be published, in a newspaper of 
general circulation in Cohasset, a list of all Building Permits issued during the previous week, 
except those issued for interior alterations and re-roofing. The list shall include the name or names 
of the applicant or applicants, the address of the property, the date the Permit was issued, a brief 
description of the proposed construction or operations and the statement: "An appeal to the Board 
of Appeals may be taken by any person aggrieved by an order or decision of the Building 
Commissioner in violation of any provision of the Zoning Act, Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 40A, §1 et seq., or the Town's Zoning Bylaws." 

Motion adopted. 

It was moved and seconded at 10 p.m. that this meeting stand adjourned only for the 
election to be held on Saturday, April 3, 2004. 

A True Record, ATTEST: 

IVIarion L. Douglas, Town Clerk 

ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
APRIL 3, 2004 



The polls opened at 8 a.m. and closed at 6 p.m. 

Total Voters — 2390 Per Cent — 47. Absentee Voters 



Pre. 1 -90; Pre. 2-106. 



Election officers sworn in by the Town Clerk, Marion Douglas at 7:45 a.m. were as follows: 



Carol St. Pierre 
Kathleen Rhodes 
Deborah Protulis 
Debra Krupczak 
Katherine Lincoln 
Caria Getto 



Janice Rosano 
Jody Doyle 
Abigail Alves 
Helen King 
Louise Flint 
Jean Thompson 
Grace Tuckerman 



Selectmen for Three Years (2) 





Pre. 1 


Pre. 2 


Total 


Merle S. Brown 


467 


569 


1036 


Ralph S. Dormitzer 


692 


627 


1319 


Louis S. Harvey 


570 


547 


1117 


Robert B. Spofford 


700 


694 


1394 


Write-ins/Scattering 


1 


2 


3 


Blanks 


262 


243 


505 


Total 


2692 


2682 


5374 


School Committee for Three Years (2) 







Patricia C. Martin 570 

Adrienne MacCarthy 543 

Scott F. O'Grady 237 

Jamie G. Williams 763 

Write-ins/Scattering 4 



475 
755 
245 
643 
8 



1045 

1298 

482 

1406 

12 



72 



Blanks 575 556 1131 

Total 2692 2682 5374 

School Committee for One Year to fill an unexpired term (1) 

Richard P. Shea 885 865 1750 

Write-ins/Scattering 10 9 19 

Blanks 451 467 918 

Total 1346 1341 2687 

Trustees Paul Pratt Memorial Library for Three Years (3) 

Sarah R. Pease 895 877 1772 

Barbara M. Power 943 903 1846 

Stacey V. Weaver 879 821 1700 

Write-ins/Scattering 2 5 7 

Blanks 1319 1417 2736 

Total 4038 4023 8061 



Assessor for Three Years (1 ) 

Elsa J. Miller 868 871 1739 

Write-ins/Scattering 2 7 9 

Blanks 476 463 939 

Total 1346 1341 2687 

Board of Health for Three Years (1) 

Stephen N. Bobo 949 952 1901 

Write-ins/Scattering 4 4 

Blanks 393 389 782 

Total 1346 1341 2687 

Cohasset Housing Authority for Five Years (1) 

Ann Barrett 859 908 1 767 

Write-ins/scattering 3 2 5 

Blanks 484 431 915 

Total 1346 1341 2687 

Cohasset Housing Authority for One Year to fill an unexpired term (1) 

Christopher M.Allen 842 855 1697 

Write-ins/scattering 5 5 10 

Blanks 499 481 980 

Total 1346 1341 2687 

Planning Board for Five Years (1) 

Michael R. Westcott 867 845 1712 

Write-ins/scattering 4 7 11 

Blanks 475 489 964 

Total 1346 1341 2687 

Planning Board for One Year to fill an unexpired term (1) 

73 



Stuart W. Ivlmey 687 
Joseph R. Nedrow 497 
Blanks 161 
Total 1346 

Recreation Commission for Five 


628 

544 
169 

1341 

Years (1) 


1315 

1038 

330 

2687 


Anthony J. Carbone 883 880 
Write-ins/scattering 1 1 
Blanks 462 460 
Total 1346 1341 

Recreation Commission for Two Years to fill an v 


1763 

2 

922 

2687 

nexpired term (1) 


Lisa L. Lojacono 865 
Write-ins/scattering 
Blanks 481 
Total 1346 

Sewer Commission for Three Years (1) 


848 

6 

487 

1341 

7764 

4 

468 

1341 

846 

6 

488 

1341 


1713 

6 

968 

2687 


Sean C. Cunning 887 
Write-ins/Scattering 5 
Blanks 454 
Total 1346 

Water Commission for Three Years (1) 


1761 

9 

917 

2687 


Nathaniel G. Palmer 890 
Write-ins/Scattering 1 
Blanks 455 
Total 1346 

Question 1. 




1736 

6 

944 

2687 



Shall the Town of Cohasset be allowed to assess an additional $400,000.00 in real estate and 
personal property taxes for the purpose of meeting the operational expenses of the Town 
Government and School System for the fiscal year beginning July 1 , Two Thousand Four? 



Yes 


693 


686 


1379 


No 


604 


624 


1228 


Blanks 


49 


31 


80 


Total 


1346 


1341 


2687 



The polls closed at 6 p.m. and the results were declared at 6:45 p.m. 
A True Record, ATTEST: 



Marion L. Douglas 
Town Clerk 



74 



STATE PRIMARY - SEPTEMBER 14, 2004 



Polls opened at 7 a.m. and closed at 8 p.m. 

Total Voters -. Democrats - 144, Republicans - 98, Libertarians -0, Green-Rainbow - 0. Percent 

voted - 4.69 which includes absentees. 

Absentees - Pre. 1 - 15; Pre. 2-17. 

Election officers sworn in by the Town Clerk, Marion Douglas, at 6:45 a.m. were as follows: 



Carol St.Pierre 
Kathleen Rhodes 
Ann Barrett 
Jody Doyle 
Jean Thompson 
Debra Krupczak 



Janice Rosano 
Margaret Hernan 
Grace Tuckerman 
Caria Getto 
Helen King 
Katherine Lincoln 



Democratic Party 



Representative in Congress (1) 


Pre. 1 


Pre. 2 


Tots 


William D. Delahunt 

Write-ins/Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


39 
2 
11 
52 


73 
2 
17 
92 


112 
4 
28 
144 


Councillor (1) 








Christopher A. lannella, Jr 

Stephen F. Flynn 

Write-ins/Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


24 

21 



7 

52 


33 
42 

17 
92 


57 
63 

24 

144 


Senator In General Court (1) 








Write-ins/Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


8 

44 

52 


16 
76 
92 


24 

120 

144 


Representative in General Court (1) 








Garrett J. Bradley 

Write-ins/Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


40 
2 
10 
52 


83 

9 
92 


123 
2 

19 

144 


Register of Deeds (1) 








William P. O'Donnell 

Anthony T. McDonnell 

Write-ins/Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


33 

15 



4 

52 


58 

25 



9 

92 


91 

40 



13 

144 



75 



39 


74 


113 





1 


1 


13 


17 


30 


52 


92 


144 


25 


50 


75 


19 


37 


56 


11 


24 


35 


23 


31 


54 











26 


42 


68 


104 


184 


288 



Sheriff (1) Pre. 1 Pre. 2 Total 

Michael G. Bellotti 

Write-ins/Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 

County Commissioner (2) 

John M. Glllls 

Francis W. O'Brien 

Stephen G. Harold 

Susan M. Rogers 

Write-ins/Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 

Republican Party 

Representative in Congress (1) 

Michael J. Jones 49 41 90 

Write-ins/Scattering 

Blanks 2 6 8 

Total 51 47 98 

Councillor (1) 

Donald A. Hussey 47 39 86 

Write-ins/Scattering 

Blanks 4 8 12 

Total 51 47 98 

Senator in General Court (1) 

Robert L. Hedlund 49 45 94 

Write-ins/Scattering 10 1 

Blanks 1 2 3 

Total 51 47 98 

Representative in General Court (1) 

Write-ins/Scattering 7 3 10 

Blanks 44 44 88 

Total 51 47 98 

Register of Deeds (1) 

Write-ins/Scattering 6 5 11 

Blanks 45 42 87 

Total 51 47 98 



76 



Sheriff (1) 

Write-ins/Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 

County Commissioner (2) 

Write-ins/Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 



Pre. 1 



Pre. 2 



Total 



8 


3 


11 


43 


44 


87 


51 


47 


98 


7 


4 


11 


95 


90 


185 


102 


94 


196 



Libertarian Party 

The Libertarian Party did not receive any votes or any write-ins. 

Green Rainbow Party 

The Green Rainbow Party did not receive any votes or any write-ins. 

The polls closed at 8 p.m. and the results were declared at 8:45 p.m. 
A True Copy, Attest: 

Marion L. Douglas, Town Clerk 



77 



NOVEMBER 2. 2004 - STATE ELECTION 



Polls opened at 7 a.m. and closed at 8 p.m. 
Total voters - 5336. Total number voted - 4519. 
Per Cent - 85% 



Total absentee voters - 509. 
Pre. 1 - 255; Pre. 2 - 254. 



Election officers sworn in by Town Clerk, Marion L. Douglas at 6:45 a.m. were as follows: 



Carol St. Pierre 


Janice Rosano 






Caria Getto 


Margaret Hernan 






Kathleen Rhodes 


Nancy Barrett 






Jean Thompson 


Deborah Protulis 






Grace Tuckerman 


Katherine Lincoln 






Helen King 


Louise Flint 






Debra Krupczak 


Jody Doyle 






Abigail Alves 








Elector of PresidentA^ice President 


Pre1 


Pre 2 


Total 


(Vote for One) 








Bacnarik & Campagna 


12 


12 


24 


Bush & Cheney 


1083 


1081 


2164 


Cobb & LaMarche 


7 


5 


12 


Kerry & Edwards 


1178 


1106 


2284 


Scattering (write-ins) 


5 


5 


10 


Nader 


5 


5 


10 


Blanks 


7 


8 


15 


Total 


2297 


2222 


4519 


Representative in Conqress 








(Vote for One) 








William D. Delahunt 


1275 


1264 


2539 


Michael J. Jones 


919 


853 


1772 


Scattering (write-ins) 


5 


1 


6 


Blanks 


98 


104 


202 


Total 


2297 


2222 


4519 


Councillor 








(Vote for One) 








Christopher A. lanella, Jr. 


891 


881 


1772 


Donald A. Hussey 


980 


897 


1877 


Brian Connolly 


115 


174 


289 


Scattering (write-ins) 


5 





5 


Blanks 


306 


270 


576 


Total 


2297 


2222 


4519 





78 



Senator in General Court 
(Vote for One 

Robert L. Hedlund 
Scattering (write-ins) 
Blanks 



1690 

33 

574 



1673 

19 

530 



3363 

52 

1104 



Total 



2297 



2222 



4519 



Representative in General Court 
(Vote for One) 

Garrett J. Bradley 
Scattering (write-ins) 
Laura Burns (write-in) 
Blanks 
Total 



1616 


1640 


3256 


38 


27 


65 


75 


41 


116 


568 


514 


1082 



2297 



2222 



4519 



Register of Deeds 
(Vote for One) 

William P. O'Donnell 
Scattering (write-ins) 
Blanks 
Total 



1441 


1480 


2921 


12 


12 


24 


844 


730 


1574 



2297 



2222 



4519 



Sheriff 
(Vote for one) 

Michael G. Bellotti 
Scattering (write-ins) 
Blanks 
Total 



1445 


1460 


2905 


14 


16 


30 


838 


746 


1584 



2297 



2222 



4519 



County Commissioner 
(Vote for not more than Two) 

John M. Gillis 
Francis W. O'Brien 
Scattering (write-ins) 
Blanks 
Total 



1158 


1133 


2291 


733 


742 


1475 


10 


18 


28 


2693 


2551 


5244 



4594 



4444 



9038 



79 



Question 1 (Non-binding) 

Shall the state representative from this district be instructed to vote in favor of legislation that would 
make possession of less than one ounce of marijuana a civil violation, subject to a maximum fine of 
$100 and not subject to any criminal penalties? 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 

Total 2297 2222 4519 



Polls closed at 8 p.m. 

Results were declared at 9:15 p.m. 

A True Record, ATTEST: 



1480 


1387 


2867 


648 


643 


1291 


167 


192 


361 



IVIarion L. Douglas 
Town Clerk 



80 



Index Special Town Meeting - December 6, 2004 



Article # Description of Article 

1 Unpaid bills. Adopted. 

2 Transfer from stabilization fund to reduce tax rate for Fiscal Year 2005. Adopted 

3 Balance 2005 operating budget. Adopted. 

4 Purchasing and refurbishing equipment. Adopted 

5 Fund collective bargaining agreement (Firefighters Local 2804) Adopted 
unanimously. 

6 Community Preservation Committee 

a. Improvements to Cohasset Housing Authority (60 Elm Street) Adopted. 

b. Engineering and design work for Beechwood playing fields, playground and 
basketball court. Adopted. 

c. Beach management plan for Sandy Beach. Adopted unanimously. 

d. Reconstructing the handicap ramp and replacing step at town hall. Adopted. 

7 Expansion of Central Sewer District to encompass parcels Lot 2 on Map 43 and 41 
on Map 42. Indefinitely postponed. 

8 Little Harbor and Atlantic Ave. sewer expansion project. Adopted. 
16 Recall petition. Defeated. 

9 Repairs to seawall on Border Street. Adopted unanimously. 

10 Increase longevity pay. Adopted unanimously. 

11 Funding for Beechwood Ball Park. Indefinitely postponed. 

12 Change of use of a portion of Woodside Cemetery from cemetery use to general 
municipal purposes. Adopted unanimously. 

13 Water system improvement projects. Adopted. 

14 Accept M.G.L. Chapter 41 , Section 19K - additional compensation. Adopted 
unanimously. 

15 Intermunicipal agreement to maintain and equip an unmanned ambulance. 
Adopted unanimously. 

17 Participate in the Greenscapes Program. Adopted unanimously. 



81 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - DECEMBER 6, 2004 



At the Special Town Meeting held on Monday, December 6, 2004 at the Cohasset High School 
Sullivan Gymnasium the following articles were contained in the warrant and acted upon as follows. 

Checkers sworn in by the Town Clerk, Marion L. Douglas at 6:30 p.m. were Carol St. Pierre, 
Geraldine Ainslie, Janice Rosano, Margaret Hernan, Kathleen Rhodes and Debra Krupczak. Tellers 
were appointed and sworn in by the Moderator, George L. Marlette III. 

The Moderator called the meeting to order at 7:10 p.m. and a quorum of 100 was present at that 
time. The registered voters checked in on the voting list totaled for Precinct 1 - 293; and Precinct 2 
- 1 28 for a total of 421 voters. 

Voted unanimously to dispense with the reading of the call of the Meeting and Return of Service 
having been examined by the Moderator and found to be in order. 

Moved by Peter Pratt to advance Article 16 to follow Article 8. Motion is adopted. 
Article 1: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, and/or borrow, 

pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum or sums of money, to be expended by the Town 

Manager, to pay for unpaid bills from previous fiscal years. 

VENDOR AMOUNT REQUESTED 

Keyspan $93,474 

Tutela Engineering Associates $1 1 ,694 

Tutela Engineering Associates (P*'03) $ 6,484 

Moved that $111,652 be appropriated to be expended by the Town Manager, to pay the below 
listed unpaid bills from previous fiscal years, and to meet this appropriation $6,000 be raised from 
the FY '05 tax levy and other general revenues of the town, $12,178 be transferred from the FY '05 
sewer enterprise revenues, and $93,474 be transferred from the Stabilization Fund: 

VENDOR AMOUNT APPROPRIATED 

Keyspan $93,474 

Tutela Engineering Associates $1 1 ,694 

Tutela Engineering Associates (FY03) $ 6,484 

Amendment offered by Roy Fitzsimmons. Moved that the Troika appoint a committee to 
investigate the school's over budget and to report back to the Annual Town Meeting. Hand count; 
Yes 131: No 110. Motion is adopted. 

Moved to separately consider the Keyspan bill from the Tutella Engineering Associates bill. Motion 
adopted. 

Keyspan bill - 9/10 vote required. Hand count; Yes 287; No 24, Motion is adopted. 
Tutela Engineering bills - 9/10 vote required. Motion adopted by the required 9/1 0's. 



82 



Article 2: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend, modify, increase or decrease or otherwise act with respect to 
any and all expenditures for all town departments, commissions and agencies as voted pursuant to 
Article 3 of the March 27, 2004 Annual Town Meeting, and to see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate from available funds, and/or borrow, pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum to be 
expended by the Town Manager, to balance the Fiscal Year 2005 Town Budget as voted at said 
Annual Town Meeting and/or to reduce the tax rate for Fiscal Year 2005. 

Moved that the sum of $11 2,333 be transferred from the Stabilization Fund and $97,667 be 
transferred from the motion voted pursuant to Article 7 of the March 2003 Annual Town Meeting for 
the Cohasset Assessors to apply to reduce the tax rate for Fiscal Year 2005. 

A 2/3's vote is required. Motion adopted by the required 2/3's. 

Article 3: 

To see what additional action the Town will vote to amend, modify, increase or decrease, or 
otherwise take, to balance the Fiscal Year 2005 Operating Budget as voted in Article 3 of the March 
27, 2004, Annual Town Meeting, and to see what additional sums the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate from available funds or othenA/ise, for the payment of the salaries and compensation, 
expenses, equipment, and outlays, capital and otherwise, of the several Town departments, for the 
current fiscal year. 



ApproDriation Account 


Original 
Appropriation 


Revised 
Appropriation 


Increase/ 
Decrease 


Director of Finance 
General Expenses 


$30,300 


$35,300 


$5,000 


Board of Assessors 
General Expenses 


$26,505 


$31,505 


$5,000 


Reserve Fund 
Reserve Fund 


$100,000 


$167,000 


$67,000 


Leqal Budget 
General Expenses 


$120,000 


$180,000 


$60,000 


Police Department 
General Expenses 


$99,850 


$103,850 


$4,000 


School Department 
General Expenses 


$11,943,800 


$12,037,300 


$93,500 


S.S. Vocational 
Regional Assess. 


$59,238 


$86,988 


$27,750 


Dept. of Public Works 
General Expenses 


$550,840 


$562,840 


$12,000 


Deot. of Public Works 
Building Maintenance 


$396,822 


$426,822 


$30,000 



83 



Benefits and Insurance 
Pension Assessment $773,665 $843,884 $70,219 

Benefits and Insurance 
Property and Liability $195,000 $230,000 $35,000 



IVIoved that $409,469 be appropriated to add to and increase the amounts voted pursuant to Article 
3 of the March 27, 2004 Annual Town Meeting as set forth below, and to fund such appropriations, 
the amount of $409,469 be hereby transferred from the appropriation voted pursuant to Article 7, of 
the March 2003 Annual Town Meeting (to pay the debt service of the Middle/High School and Deer 
Hill school projects) as follows: 



Appropriation Account 


Original 
Appropriation 


Revised 
Appropriation 


Increase/ 
Decrease 


Director of Finance 
General Expenses 


$30,300 


$35,300 


$5,000 


Board of Assessors 
General Expenses 


$26,505 


$31,505 


$5,000 


Reserve Fund 
Reserve Fund 


$100,000 


$167,000 


$67,000 


Leqal Budget 
General Expenses 


$120,000 


$180,000 


$60,000 


Police Department 
General Expenses 


$99,850 


$103,850 


$4,000 


School Department 
General Expenses 


$11,943,800 


$12,037,300 


$93,500 


S.S. Vocational 
Regional Assess. 


$59,238 


$86,988 


$27,750 


Dept. of Public Works 
General Expenses 


$550,840 


$562,840 


$12,000 


Dept. of Public Works 
Building Maintenance 


$396,822 


$426,822 


$30,000 


Benefits and Insurance 
Pension Assessment 


$773,665 


$843,884 


$70,219 


Benefits and Insurance 
Property and Liability 


$195,000 


$230,000 


$35,000 



Amendment by Leiand Jenkins - moved to transfer $93,500 under the School Department 
(General Expenses) to the reserve fund to be disbursed by the Advisory Committee. 
Motion adopted. Main motion as amended Is adopted. 



84 



Article 4: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, and/or borrow, 
pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum or sums of money, to be expended by the Town 
Manager, for the purpose of purchasing or refurbishing the equipment listed below, and to authorize 
the Town Manager to trade-in or otherwise dispose of such existing equipment. 

Police Department Vehicles (2) $56,000 

Police Department Equipment $ 5,000 

Fire Engine Refurbishing $40,000 

School Utility Vehicle $1 5,000 

Public Works Vehicles (2) $62,000 

Elder Affairs Vans $ 6,000 

Elder Affairs Computers $1 0,000 

Moved that $194,000 be hereby appropriated to be expended by the Town Manager, for the 
purpose of purchasing and equipping the below listed equipment, that the Town Manager be 
authorized to trade-in or otherwise dispose of any such existing equipment, and that, to meet this 
appropriation, $6,000 be raised from the FY '05 tax levy and other general revenues of the Town, 
and the Treasurer of the Town, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to 
borrow pursuant to any applicable statute the balance of $188,000 and to issue notes and bonds of 
the Town therefore. 

Police Department Vehicles (2) $56,000 

Police Department Equipment $ 5,000 

Fire Engine Refurbishing $40,000 

School Utility Vehicle $1 5,000 

Public Works Vehicles (2) $62,000 

Elder Affairs Vans $ 6,000 

Elder Affairs Computers $1 0,000 

A 2/3's vote is required. Motion adopted by the required 2/3's. 

Article 5: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$18,900, to be expended by the Town Manager, to fund the FY05 cost items of a collective 
bargaining agreement between the Town, represented by the Board of Selectmen, and the Fire 
Department employees, represented by the Cohasset Permanent Firefighters Local 2804, in 
accordance with Chapter 150E of the General laws. 

Moved that $18,900 be transferred from FY '05 Additional Lottery Funds to be expended by the 
Town Manager, to fund the FY'05 cost items of a collective bargaining agreement between the 
Town, represented by the Board of Selectmen, and the Fire Department employees, represented 
by the Cohasset Permanent Firefighters Local 2804. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 6: 



85 



To see what action the Town will take with respect to the recommendations of the Community 
Preservation Committee for Fiscal Year 2005, and to see if the Town will vote to Implement any 
such recommendations by appropriating a sum or sums of money from the Community 
Preservation Fund, established pursuant to Chapter 44B of the General Laws, and from any other 
source, by raising and appropriating or borrowing pursuant to any applicable statute for this 
purpose. 

Recommendation A: 

Moved that Thirty Five Thousand Dollars ($35,000.00) be transferred from the Community 
Preservation Fund, with the intention that these funds be available in FY 2005 and thereafter, to be 
expended by the Town Manager, for the purpose of making various capital improvements to the 
Cohasset Housing Authority's 60 Elm Street Apartment Complex. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Recommendation B : 

Moved that Thirty Thousand Dollars ($30,000.00) be transferred from the Community Preservation 
Fund with the intention that these funds be available in FY 2005 and thereafter, to be expended by 
the Town Manager, for engineering and design work related to the reconstruction of the Beechwood 
Street playing fields, playground and basketball court. 

Motion is adopted. 

Recommendation C: 



Moved that Ten Thousand Dollars ($10,000.00) be transferred from the Community Preservation 
Fund with the Intention that these funds be available in FY 2005 and thereafter, to be expended by 
the Town Manager, for hiring for an appropriate professional to prepare a beach management plan 
for Sandy Beach. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Recommendation D: 

Moved that Sixteen Thousand Dollars ($16,000.00) be transferred from the Community 
Preservation Fund's Historic Preservation Sub-Account, with the intention that these funds be 
available in FY 2005 and thereafter, to be expended by the Town Manager, for the purposes of 
reconstructing the handicapped ramp leading to Town Hall and for historical renovation to the steps 
leading to the antique portion of Town Hall by replacing the existing cement top step with a 
historically appropriate granite one. 

Motion is adopted. 



86 



Article 7: 

To see if tiie Town will vote to authorize the expansion of the existing Central Sewer District to 
encompass parcels named Lot 2 on Map 43 and Lot 41 on Map 42 on the Assessors' maps, the 
purpose of which is to accept an amount no greater than 14,250 gallons per day of effluent treated 
on the site of those parcels to DEP tertiary standards with nitrogen removal and disinfection to 
Town standards for named bodies of water. This article is contingent on sufficient treatment 
capacity being reserved from the potential future treatment capacity of Cohasset's Treatment Plant, 
regardless of any future tie-ins accepted and/or mandated, to sewer the Little Harbor District in 
accordance with plans submitted to the Attorney General in response to the Second Amended Final 
Judgment. The reserved capacity is to be maintained until used for the Little Harbor District. 

Moved that this article be indefinitely postponed. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 8: 

Moved that the Town formalize its commitment to take all actions and measures and appropriate 
the necessary funds to implement the Little Harbor and Atlantic Avenue sewer expansion. In 
several Town-funded studies, a sewer was found to be the most economical and effective way to 
eliminate wastewater influences on Little Harbor and the coastline along Atlantic Avenue. The 
expansion is defined in the supplement to the "Final Wastewater Facility Plan and Environmental 
Impact Report EOEA #10275", revised February 2003, a copy of which is on file at the Town Clerk's 
office, and which includes awarding of the construction contracts in spring of 2007 and project 
completion in summer of 2009. The commitment will be formalized by incorporating the schedule 
contained in said Supplement in to the Second Amended Final Judgment." 

CITIZENS' PETITION 

NAME ADDRESS NAME ADDRESS 

James F. Marten 78 Nichols Road Patricia C. Dean 207 Jerusalem Rd 

Richard E. Brooks 68 Nichols Road Stuart Ivimey 7 Sankey Rd 

Akira Isihar 8 Sandy Beach Lane Juliette D. Guild 365 Jerusalem Rd 

Ikuko Isihar 8 Sandy Beach Lane Margie Wollam 177 Atlantic Ave 

Moved that the Board of Selectmen and Sewer Commission, as applicable, are directed to take all 
action necessary and appropriated to cause the Little Harbor and Atlantic Avenue sewer expansion 
project, as described in "Supplement to the Final Wastewater Facility Plan and Environmental 
Impact Report EOEA No. 10275, revised February 2003, a copy of which is on file at the office of 
the Town Clerk, to be completed in accordance with the time schedule included in such report, 
subject to such further Town Meeting action as may be required; and that the Board of Selectmen 
and Sewer Commission, as applicable, are further directed to take such action as may be 
necessary to cause the engineering documents, specifications and corresponding cost estimates 
for such project to be completed expeditiously and an article for the approval and funding of such 
project to be included in the warrant for the 2005 Annual Town Meeting. 

Hand count; Yes 246: No 91, Motion is adopted. 

At 10:30 p.m. on motion made and seconded, the Moderator adjourned the meeting to Tuesday, 
December 7, 2004 at 7 p.m. at the Cohasset High School Sullivan Gymnasium. 



87 



Tuesday Evening December 7, 2004 

The Town Clerk appointed checkers and the Moderator appointed tellers. The Moderator called the 
meeting to order at 7:15 p.m. and a quorum of 100 was present at that time. The registered voters 
checked in on the voting list for Pre. 1 - 99-; Pre. 2-69 for a total of 168. 

Article 16 : 

To see if the Town will vote to approve a petition to the General Court, accompanied by the 
following bill for a special law relating to the Town of Cohasset under Clause (1) of Section 8 of 
Article 2, as amended of the Amendments to the Constitution of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, to the end that legislation be adopted precisely as follows, except for clerical or 
editorial changes of form only: 

AN ACT RELATIVE TO RECALL ELECTIONS IN THE TOWN OF COHASSET 

SECTION 1 . Chapter 34 of the Acts of 1997, as amended by Chapter 421 of the 
Acts of 1 998 and Chapter 330 of the Acts of 2000, is hereby amended by inserting 
the following new section: 

Section 2A. A person who holds an elective office in the town of Cohasset maybe recalled 
there from by the; registered voters of the town as provided in this section. 

(a) One hundred or more qualified voters may make and file with the town clerk an 
affidavit containing the name of the officer sought to be recalled and a 
statement of the grounds for recall. The town clerk shall thereupon deliver to 
10 persons first named on the affidavit a sufficient number of printed petition 
forms demanding the recall, copies of which forms he shall keep available. The 
petition forms may be completed by printing or typewriter and they shall contain 
the, names of the 10 persons to whom they are issued, the name of the person 
sought to be recalled, the office from which recall is sought, and the grounds for 
recall as stated in the affidavit. They shall demand the election of a successor 
to the office and they shall be dated, signed and sealed by the town clerk. The 
recall petition shall be returned to the office of the town clerk not later than 5 
o'clock in the afternoon on or before the first work day following 20 days after 
the date they are issued, signed by at least 10 percent of the total number of 
qualified persons registered to vote in the town as of the date the affidavit was 
filed with the town clerk. To every signature shall be added the place of 
residence of the signer, giving the street and number, if any. One of the 10 
persons to whom the recall petition forms are issued shall make an affidavit on 
each page that statements therein contained are true, and that each signature 
appended to the petition is the genuine signature of the person whose name it 
purports to be. The town clerk shall forthwith, following the day of such filing 
with the, office of the town clerk, submit the recall petition forms to the board of 
registrars of voters which shall, within 5 work days after the day of receipt, 
certify in writing thereon the number of signatures which are those of qualified 
persons registered to vote in the town as of the date the affidavit was filed with 
the town clerk. The board of registrars of voters, upon the completion of its 
certification, shall return the recall petition forms to the town clerk. 

(b) If the recall petition forms shall be certified by the board of registrars of voters to 
contain at least 10 per cent of the qualified persons registered to vote, and if the 
petition shall be found and certified by the town clerk to be sufficient, the town 
clerk shall give notice without delay, in writing, to the elected officer whose 



88 



recall Is sought by sending to the officer a copy of the affidavit and the recall 
petition form together with notice, of the number of qualified voters certified by 
the board of registrars of voters who signed the recall petition forms and the 
total number of qualified voters in the town as of the most recent town election. 
If the officer to whom notice is directed by the town clerk does not resign the 
office within 5 days following the receipt of the notice from the town clerk, the 
town Clerk shall give notice in writing to the board of selectmen not later than 1 
work day following the expiration of the said 5 days. The board of selectmen 
shall order a special election to be held not more than 90 days after receipt of 
notice from the town clerk as foresaid, and not less than 64 days from the date 
of the order. If any other town election to be held within 100 days of receipt by 
the board of selectmen of notice from the town clerk, the recall election shall be 
postponed and shall be held at the time and in conjunction with the other 
election. If vacancy occurs in the office for any reason after the board of 
selectmen has ordered a recall election, the recall election shall nevertheless 
proceed as provided for herein. 

(c) An officer sought to be removed may be a candidate to succeed himself, and 
unless he requests otherwise in writing, the town clerk shall place his name on 
the ballot without nomination. The number of signatures of qualified voters 
required to place the name of a candidate on the official ballot for use at a recall 
election shall not be less than 25. The publication of the warrant for recall 
election and the conduct of the recall election shall be in accordance with the 
General Laws regulating elections, unless otherwise provided in this act. 

(d) The incumbent shall continue to perform the duties of his office until the recall 
election. If then reelected, he shall continue in office for the remainder of his 
unexpired term subject to recall as before, except as provided in this section. If 
not reelected in the recall election, he shall be deemed removed upon the 
qualification of his successor, who shall hold office during the unexpired term. 
If the successor fails to qualify within 5 days after receiving notification of his 
election, the incumbent shall thereupon be deemed removed and the office 
vacant. 

(e) The ballots used at the recall election shall submit the following propositions in 
the order indicated: 

For the recall of (name of officer) { } 
Against the recall of (name of officer) { } 

Immediately at the right of each proposition there shall be a square in which the 
voter, by making across mark (X) may vote for either of the propositions. Under the 
propositions shall appear the word "Candidates" and the directions for the voters required 
by law, and beneath the word "Candidates" shall be the names of candidates nominated. 

If a majority of the votes cast is against the recall, the votes for the candidates 
need not be counted. If a majority of the votes cast is in favor of the recall, the officer shall 
be deemed to be recalled and the ballots for candidates shall then be counted. The 
candidate receiving the highest number of votes shall be declared elected. IF the officer is 
recalled, he shall be deemed removed upon certification of the election results by the town 
clerk. The candidate receiving the highest vote and therefore elected, shall serve for the 
balance of the unexpired term of the officer removed. 

(f) A recall petition shall not be filed against an officer within 6 months after he takes 
office, nor, in the case of an officer elected in a recall election, until 6 months after 
that election. A recall shall not be filed against an officer subjected to a recall 
election, and not recalled thereby, until at least 6 months after the election at which 
his recall was submitted to the voters. 



89 



(g) A person who has been recalled from an office, or who has resigned from office 
while recall proceedings were pending against him/her, shall not be appointed to 
any town office within 1 year after the recall or resignation. 
SECTION 2. This act shall take effect upon passage. 



NAME 

Stacy Weaver 
John Osten 
Jamie Williams 
Louis S. Harveym 
Joann A. Ford 



ADDRESS 

44 Nichols Road 
50 Linden Drive 
60 Surry Drive 
465 King Street 
30 Whitehead 



CITIZENS PETITION 
NAME 



Margaret Charles 
Joseph McElroy 
Richard Brooks 
Akira Isihar 



ADDRESS 

85 Linden Drive 
59 Windy Hill Rd 
68Nichols Rd 
8 Sandy Beach Ln 



Moved to see if the Town will vote to approve a petition to the General Court, accompanied by the 
following bill for a special law relating to the Town of Cohasset under Clause (1) of Section 8 of 
Article 2, as amended of the Amendments to the Constitution of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, to the end that legislation be adopted precisely as follows, except for clerical or 
editorial changes of form only: 

AN ACT RELATIVE TO RECALL ELECTIONS IN THE TOWN OF COHASSET 

SECTION 1 . Chapter 34 of the Acts of 1 997, as amended by Chapter 421 of the 
Acts of 1998 and Chapter 330 of the Acts of 2000, is hereby amended by inserting 
the following new section: 

Section 2A. A person who holds an elective office in the town of Cohasset maybe recalled 
there from by the; registered voters of the town as provided in this section. 

(f) One hundred or more qualified voters may make and file with the town clerk an 

affidavit containing the name of the officer sought to be recalled and a 
statement of the grounds for recall. The town clerk shall thereupon deliver to 
10 persons first named on the affidavit a sufficient number of printed petition 
forms demanding the recall, copies of which forms he shall keep available. The 
petition forms may be completed by printing or typewriter and they shall contain 
the, names of the 10 persons to whom they are issued, the name of the person 
sought to be recalled, the office from which recall is sought, and the grounds for 
recall as stated in the affidavit. They shall demand the election of a successor 
to the office and they shall be dated, signed and sealed by the town clerk. The 
recall petition shall be returned to the office of the town clerk not later than 5 
o'clock in the afternoon on or before the first work day following 20 days after 
the date they are issued, signed by at least 10 percent of the total number of 
qualified persons registered to vote in the town as of the date the affidavit was 
filed with the town clerk. To every signature shall be added the place of 
residence of the signer, giving the street and number, if any. One of the 10 
persons to whom the recall petition forms are issued shall make an affidavit on 
each page that statements therein contained are true, and that each signature 
appended to the petition is the genuine signature of the person whose name it 
purports to be. The town clerk shall forthwith, following the day of such filing 
with the, office of the town clerk, submit the recall petition forms to the board of 
registrars of voters which shall, within 5 work days after the day of receipt, 
certify in writing thereon the number of signatures which are those of qualified 
persons registered to vote in the town as of the date the affidavit was filed with 
the town clerk. The board of registrars of voters, upon the completion of its 
certification, shall return the recall petition forms to the town clerk. 



90 



(g) If the recall petition forms shall be certified by the board of registrars of voters to 

contain at least 10 per cent of the qualified persons registered to vote, and if the 
petition shall be found and certified by the town clerk to be sufficient, the town 
clerk shall give notice without delay, in writing, to the elected officer whose 
recall is sought by sending to the officer a copy of the affidavit and the recall 
petition form together with notice, of the number of qualified voters certified by 
the board of registrars of voters who signed the recall petition forms and the 
total number of qualified voters in the town as of the most recent town election. 
If the officer to whom notice is directed by the town clerk does not resign the 
office within 5 days following the receipt of the notice from the town clerk, the 
town Clerk shall give notice in writing to the board of selectmen not later than 1 
work day following the expiration of the said 5 days. The board of selectmen 
shall order a special election to be held not more than 90 days after receipt of 
notice from the town clerk as foresaid, and not less than 64 days from the date 
of the order. If any other town election to be held within 100 days of receipt by 
the board of selectmen of notice from the town clerk, the recall election shall be 
postponed and shall be held at the time and in conjunction with the other 
election. If vacancy occurs in the office for any reason after the board of 
selectmen has ordered a recall election, the recall election shall nevertheless 
proceed as provided for herein. 

(h) An officer sought to be removed may be a candidate to succeed himself, and 

unless he requests otherwise in writing, the town clerk shall place his name on 
the ballot without nomination. The number of signatures of qualified voters 
required to place the name of a candidate on the official ballot for use at a recall 
election shall not be less than 25. The publication of the warrant for recall 
election and the conduct of the recall election shall be in accordance with the 
General Laws regulating elections, unless otherwise provided in this act. 

(i) The incumbent shall continue to perform the duties of his office until the recall 

election. If then reelected, he shall continue in office for the remainder of his 
unexpired term subject to recall as before, except as provided in this section. If 
not reelected in the recall election, he shall be deemed removed upon the 
qualification of his successor, who shall hold office during the unexpired term. 
If the successor fails to qualify within 5 days after receiving notification of his 
election, the incumbent shall thereupon be deemed removed and the office 
vacant. 

G) The ballots used at the recall election shall submit the following propositions in 

the order indicated: 

For the recall of (name of officer) { } 
Against the recall of (name of officer) { } 

Immediately at the right of each proposition there shall be a square in which the voter, by 
making across mark (X) may vote for either of the propositions. Under the propositions shall 
appear the word "Candidates" and the directions for the voters required by law, and beneath the 
word "Candidates" shall be the names of candidates nominated. 

If a majority of the votes cast is against the recall, the votes for the candidates need not be 
counted. If a majority of the votes cast is in favor of the recall, the officer shall be deemed to be 
recalled and the ballots for candidates shall then be counted. The candidate receiving the highest 
number of votes shall be declared elected. IF the officer is recalled, he shall be deemed removed 
upon certification of the election results by the town clerk. The candidate receiving the highest vote 
and therefore elected, shall serve for the balance of the unexpired term of the officer removed. 

(f) A recall petition shall not be filed against an officer within 6 months after he takes 

office, nor, in the case of an officer elected in a recall election, until 6 months after 
that election. A recall shall not be filed against an officer subjected to a recall 
election, and not recalled thereby, until at least 6 months after the election at which 
his recall was submitted to the voters. 



91 



(g) A person who has been recalled from an office, or who has resigned from office 
while recall proceedings were pending against him/her, shall not be appointed to 
any town office within 1 year after the recall or resignation. 
SECTION 2. This act shall take effect upon passage. 

Amendment offered by the Advisory Committee. Moved that the sentence beginning "One 
hundred or more of qualified voter be replaced with two hundred fifty or more qualified voter and 
whenever 10% occurs In the text be replace with 20%. Section 2A of Article 16 is hereby amended 
by adding the following new section 2A(h): A recall petition shall not be filed against an officer 
during the term in office that commenced at any time before December 6, 2004. 

Amendment offered by Thomas Callahan. Moved that a recall may only be sought if the 
following applies to the official being recalled: 

1. Conviction of a crime or misdemeanor by a court of competent jurisdiction; or 

2. A finding of conflict of interest by the appropriate state authority. 

Amendment offered by Thomas Callahan is defeated. 

Amendment offered by the Advisory Committee is adopted. 

Amendment offered by Lucia Woods. Moved the proponents for the recall shall be responsible 

for the costs, charges and expense that the Town would incur in holding such an election. 

Amendment offered by Lucia Woods Is defeated. 

Hand count taken on main motion as amended. Yes60iNo93. Motion is defeated. 



Article 9: 

To see If the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds and/or borrow, 
pursuant to any applicable statute, the sum of $600,000, to be expended by the Town Manager, for 
engineering, permitting, rebuilding, reconstructing and making extraordinary repairs to the seawall 
on Border Street between Atlantica and the Mill River Marine. 

Moved that $600,000 be hereby appropriated, to be expended by the Town Manager, for 
engineering, permitting and for the rebuilding, reconstruction of, and making of extraordinary repairs 
to the seawall on Border Street between Atlantica and the Mill River Marine, and to meet this 
appropriation, the Treasurer of the town, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, borrow 
$600,000 for this purpose and issue notes and bonds of the town therefore. 

A 2/3's vote is required. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

ArticlelO: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend Article XI, Section 5(f), Longevity Pay, of the Town Personnel 
Bylaws according to the schedule listed below, and to fund such amendment by raising and 
appropriating and/or transferring from available funds the sum of $3,000, to be allocated by the 
Town Accountant to the appropriate departments. 



Length of Sen^ice 


Current Amount 


New Amount 


Five Years 


$200 


$350 


Ten Years 


$400 


$550 


Fifteen Years 


$600 


$750 


Twenty Years 


$800 


$950 



92 



Current Amount 


New Amount 


$200 


$350 


$400 


$550 


$600 


$750 


$800 


$950 


$800 


$1,050 



Twenty Five Years $800 $1,050 

Moved that Article XI, Section 5(f), Longevity Pay, of the Town Personnel By-laws be hereby 
amended in accordance with the below listed schedule, and to fund such amendment, that $3,000 
be raised and appropriated from the FY '05 tax levy and other general revenues of the Town to be 
allocated by the Town Accountant to the appropriate departments. 

Length of Service 
Five Years 
Ten Years 
Fifteen Years 
Twenty Years 
Twenty Five Years 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 11: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds and/or borrow, 
pursuant to any applicable statute, the sum of $30,000, to be expended by the Town Manager, for 
engineering services related to the reconstruction and improvement of the Beechwood Ball Park. 

Moved that this article be indefinitely postponed. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 



Article 12: 



To see if the Town will vote, pursuant to M.G.L. c.40 1 5A, to authorize a change in use of a certain 
parcel from cemetery use to general municipal purposes and to transfer custody, jurisdiction and 
control of such parcel from the Cemetery Commission to the Board of Selectmen. The parcel is a 
portion of the land known as Woodside Cemetery, which is located on Assessors' Map 74, Parcel 
001 z. Said parcel has been declared surplus by the Superintendent of Woodside Cemetery and by 
the Board of Selectmen acting in their capacity as Cemetery Commissioners. 

Moved that, pursuant to M.G.L. c. 40, §1 5A, a change in use of a certain parcel described below be 
authorized and approved from cemetery use to general municipal purposes: the parcel is a portion 
of the lands known as Woodside Cemetery consisting of approximately 83,282 square feet of land 
(the "Surplus Parcel") called the "Surplus Area" on the plan entitled "Surplus Area of Cemetery 
Land located on Route 3A in Cohasset, Massachusetts" being a portion of Assessor's Map 74 
Parcel 001 x (the "Property"), which is more particularly described in the deed to the Town recorded 
in Norfolk Registry of Deeds Book 567 Page 431 ; and further that the Board of Selectmen is hereby 
authorized to execute and deliver an amendment to the existing restriction on the Property in order 
to release the Surplus Parcel from the restriction, to extend the term of the restriction as applicable 
to the balance of the Property up to 100 years, to provide for green screen on the Property's 
boundary with Route 3A, and other such provisions as the Board of Selectmen may in their 
discretion deem necessary and appropriate. 

A 2/3's vote is required. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 13: 



93 



To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, and/or borrow 
pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum or sums of money for the Water Commission to complete 
various water system improvement projects including, but not limited to, improvements to the Lily 
Pond Water Treatment Plant, cleaning and lining water pipes, replacing water pipes, capital 
maintenance, and other improvements to wells, storage tanks, and water distribution system, the 
purchase, acquisition, or taking by eminent domain of property, and other measures to protect the 
sources of public drinking water supply and further that this article is intended to take effect upon 
passage in Fiscal Year 2005. 

Moved that $2,000.000, be appropriated for the Water Commission to complete various water 
system improvement projects including, but not limited to, improvements to the Lily Pond Water 
Treatment Plant, cleaning and lining water pipes, replacing water pipes, capital maintenance, and 
other improvements to wells, storage tanks, and water distribution system, the purchase, 
acguisition, or taking by eminent domain of property, and other measures to protect the sources of 
public drinking water supply: that this appropriation is intended to take effect upon passage in the 
Fiscal Year 2005; and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer of the Town, with the approval 
of The Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $2,000,000 and to issue notes and bonds of the 
Town therefore, it being the intent that such borrowing be general obligation bonds of the Town with 
the principal and interest thereon to be paid from Water Commission revenues. 

A 2/3's vote is required. 

Motion adopted by the required 2/3's. 



94 



Article 14 : 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provision of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 41 , 
Section 19K relative to the compensation of the Town Clerk, the text of which statute is set forth 
below, and in order to meet the obligations of said Section 19K, vote to raise and appropriate, 
transfer from available funds or otherwise provide the sum of $1,000 to be added to the amount 
voted under Town Clerk Personal Services, as voted at the Annual Town Meeting of March 27, 
2004. 

Section 19K. In any town that accepts this section, a town clerk who has completed the necessary 
courses of study and training, and been awarded a certificate by the Massachusetts Town Clerks' 
Association as a certified Massachusetts municipal clerk, shall receive as compensation from such 
town, in addition to the regular annual compensation paid by such town for services in such office, 
an amount equal to 10 percent of such regular compensation, but no more than $1,000 per year. In 
order to qualify for such additional compensation, a town clerk shall submit to the board of 
selectmen of such town proof of the award of such certificate. The additional compensation 
provided in this section shall be prorated for any 12 month period in which an eligible person does 
not hold the office of town clerk for 12 consecutive months. Such additional compensation shall 
discontinue when certification is discontinued or withdrawn. 

Moved that Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 41, Section 19K be accepted by the Town of 
Cohasset, and that, in order to meet the obligations of said Section 19K, $1,000 be raised and 
appropriated from the FY '05 tax levy and other general revenues of the Town, to be added to the 
amount voted with respect to the motion pursuant to Article 3 for Town Clerk Personal Services at 
the Annual Town Meeting of March 27, 2004. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 15: 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into an Intermunicipal 
agreement with another town or towns pursuant to M.G.L. c.40, sec. 4A, to share the cost of 
purchasing, equipping and maintaining an unmanned ambulance for a period not to exceed twenty- 
five years, and upon such other terms and conditions as the parties may agree. 

Moved that the Board of Selectmen be hereby authorized to enter into an Intermunicipal agreement 
with another town or towns, pursuant to M.G.L. c.40, sec. 4A, to share the cost of purchasing, 
equipping and maintaining an unmanned ambulance for a period not to exceed twenty five years, 
and upon such other terms and conditions as the parties may agree. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 17: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or transfer from available funds a sum or 
sums of money for the Water Resources Protection Committee to participate in the South Shore 
Greenscapes Program and to take other actions to promote the use of environmentally friendly 
lawn care practices in Cohasset; and further that this article is intended to take effect upon passage 
in Fiscal Year 2005. 

Moved that $5,000 be hereby appropriated for the Water Resources Protection Committee to 
participate in the South Shore Greenscapes Program and to take other actions to promote the use 
of environmentally friendly lawn care practices in Cohasset; that this appropriation is to take effect 
upon passage in FY 2005, and that to meet this appropriation $2,500 be raised from FY '05 tax levy 



95 



and other general revenues of the Town, and an additional $2,500 be appropriated to this purpose 
from Water Department revenues. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

It was moved and seconded that the Special Town Meeting be dissolved at 10 p.m. 
A true record, ATTEST: 



Marion L. Douglas 
Town Clerk 



96 



VITAL STATISTICS 



BIRTHS FOR THE YEAR 2004 



DATE 

JANUARY 

1 

8 

13 

15 

16 

24 

30 

31 

31 

FEBRUARY 

12 



MARCH 



APRIL 



MAY 



4 

4 

18 

23 

28 

30 

31 



2 

3 

8 

13 

16 

17 

26 

29 

29 

30 



6 

10 

11 

13 

15 

17 

17 

25 

25 

31 



NAME OF CHILD 



Sydney Fairbairn Roland 
Abigail Samantha Moy 
Juliana Doty Miskovich 
Brooke Elisabeth Evans 
Nora Helen Cunningham 
Brandon Daniel Bellefontaine 
Ariana Bella Clark 
Connor Bancroft Nicholls 
Nicholas Robert Henry 



Grace Adeline Kondracki 



Thomas Olaf Svensen 
Matthew Robert Canavan 
Michael Cole Rawson 
Calliope Katherine Lanier 
Abigail Livia Chapman 
George English Sherbrooke 
Cobas Michael Jones 



Joshua William Kripke 
Lindley Amalia Day 
Nathaniel Barnes Charron 
Giacomo Emilio Lyons 
Justin Liam Appleby 
Jenna Marie Giglio 
Natalie Vanessa Simone 
Hayes Richard McCarron 
Patrick Michael McCarron 
Emme Paz Hoehn 



William Cooper Duxbury 
Lucas Lakshman Fernando 
Bryce Alexander Morrissey 
Maryn Elizabeth Bissell 
Brendan Joseph Cingari 
Perri Rose Fusco 
Phoebe Grace Fusco 
Owen Richard Eagan 
Emily Vivian Williams 
Paige Marie Glavin 



PARENTS (MOTHER'S MAIDEN NAME) 



Robert and Katherine Roland (Fairbairn) 
Jeffery and Margaret Moy (Halas) 
Craig and Rachel Miskovich (Doty) 
Richard and Lisa Evans (Ferreira) 
Matthew and Patricia Cunningham (Lipschultz) 
John and Alice Bellefontaine (Marsh) 
James and Leanne Clark (Sestito) 
Malcolm and Heather Nicholls (St. Onge) 
Scott and Mary Henry (Gagnon) 



Christopher and Kristi Kondracki (Cakes) 



Ann and Stephen Svensen (Sawyer) 
Robert and Laurie Canavan (Hunt) 
Michael and Alicia Rawson (Barba) 
Anthony and Carlene Lanier (Foreman) 
David and Linda Chapman (Rosatone) 
Patrick and Katherine Sherbrooke (Apruzzese) 
Michael and Heather Jones (Ludlow) 



Jeffrey and Alison Kripke (Priore) 
Henry and Vanessa Day (Bottjer) 
James and Sarah Charron (Seckinger) 
Joseph and Francine Lyons (Sylvia) 
Mark and Michelle Appleby (Devoir) 
Paul and Susan Giglio (McFadyen) 
Brian and Vanessa Simone (Jolly) 
Daniel and Christine McCarron (Lagrotteria) 
Daniel and Christine McCarron (Lagrotteria) 
Colin and Marcela Hoehn (Peralta) 



John and Mary Duxbury (Stahan) 
Sanjeeva and Michelle Fernando (Falbo) 
James and Karen Morrissey (Perdigao) 
Mark and Laura Bissell (Panzetta) 
David and Jaime Cingari (Kievit) 
William and Sarina Fusco (Sheehy) 
William and Sarina Fusco (Sheehy) 
Owen and Nicole Eagan (D'Allessandro) 
Keith and Christine Williams (Coyne) 
Thomas and Linda Glavin (Szymanski) 



97 



31 



John Christopher Pyne 



Christopher and Rebecca Pyne (Palmer) 



JUNE 



1 


Grace Marie Abromowich 


16 


Sloane Tsena Harp 


19 


Lisel Rose Nee 


21 


Carter Logan Bernstein 


27 


Adam Michael Stelljes 


30 


Maximillian Richard Gomez 


JULY 




9 


Noah James Carmody 


9 


Emmy Genevieve Rafferty 


13 


Luke Tolan Willmott 


15 


Ava Rose Biestek 


16 


Carter John Boyle 


16 


Ellen Tague Fox 


20 


Cameron William Igo 


21 


Tate Adams Haver 


26 


Audrey Kathleen Ryan 


AUGUST 




8 


Reid Maddalon Mclnerney 


17 


Sophia Carmel Hess 


18 


Anna Temple Deininger 


22 


John Patrick Hegarty 


23 


Dylan Xavier Galvin 


24 


Wade Thompson Puzella 


26 


Madeleine Ray Miller 


28 


Nola Jane Gallagher 


28 


Theresa Rose Cullen 


29 


Sara Catherine Cullinan 


SEPTEMBER 




4 


Brooke Skyier Leggat 


7 


Grace Mary McNamara 


12 


Kira Elizabeth Fulton 


16 


Perrin Bennett Hirise 


23 


Emma Carroll Thornton 


27 


Paige Elizabeth Schaffer 


OCTOBER 




7 


Addison Larson Crocker 


7 


Emilie Maria Dubiel 


9 


Ainsley Josephine Allen 


9 


Carrington Jolynne Carr 


10 


Chloe Alexandra Roberts 


13 


Katherine Anne Wipf 


15 


Frances D. Burke Brisbane 


15 


Catherine Mary Jane Brisbane 


16 


Isabella Marie Richter 


23 


James Stuart Smith, III 


30 


Amanda Rose Oliver 



Decran and Carol Abromov\/ich (Lecomte) 
Erik and Marni Harp (Schwartz) 
Martin and Helena Nee (Bryntesson) 
Robert and Logan Bernstein (Debutts) 
Stephen and Cheryl Stelljes (Wilkinson) 
Gabriel and Sarah Gomez (Hall) 



Orion and Meka-Mari Carmody (Laugelie) 
Robert and Julie Rafferty (Landman) 
Jeffrey and Eileen Willmott (Tolan) 
James and Christina Biestek (Cappelietti) 
Gregory and Deanna Boyle (Joseph) 
John and Sara Fox (Tague) 
Christopher and Laurie Igo (Pepi) 
Dale and Kara Haver (Henderson) 
Joseph and Carol Ryan (McKeon) 



Lance and Patricia Mclnerney (O'Connor) 
Robert and Susan Hess (Jarvis) 
Peter and Michelle Deinger (Martin) 
Thomas and Laurie Hegarty (Christman) 
Kevin and Anastasia Galvin (Udolkin Diacova) 
Mark and Karen Puzella (Fanton) 
Anthony and Jennifer Miller (Coakley) 
Richard and Jennifer Gallagher (Babner) 
Cormac Cullen and Margaret Terry 
Christopher and Sara Cullinan (Crowell) 



Robert Leggat and Sara D'Eathe 
Patrick and Kerry McNamara (O'Brien) 
David and Lisa Fulton (Hetmarck) 
Kevin and Joann Hirise (Plecenik) 
Vincent and Suzanne Thornton (Lamantia) 
Regis and Shannon Schaffer (Surgent) 



Davenport and Kendra Crocker (Larson) 
Douglas and Maria Dubiel (Willmore) 
Christopher and Michele Allen (Werge) 
Edwin and Tanya Carr (Bodell) 
Eric and Aveen Roberts (D'Arcy) 
Gregory and Barbara Wipf (Kelly) 
Patrick and Denise Brisbane (Burke) 
Patrick and Denise Brisbane (Burke) 
Eric Richter and Mary Michel 
James and Patrice Smith (Leahy) 
William and Kathleen Oliver (Walsh) 



98 



NOVEMBER 




1 


Tess Catherine St John 


1 


Whilhelmina Marion St John 


3 


Piper Grace Quigley 


8 


Robert John Norton 


9 


Georgia Curley Barrett 


15 


John Donald Greenip 


17 


Nathaniel Mathias Palmer 


23 


Sebastian Peter A. Fennell 


23 


Alexis Carey Steinnnetz 


27 


Thomas Hartley Hansen, Jr. 


DECEMBER 




2 


Samantha McCormick Hosp 


6 


Hannah Elizabeth Hession 


7 


Caiden Armstrong Smith 


15 


Logan Carerry Finn 


17 


Sarah Nicole Conroy 



Brendan and Stephanie St John (Walsh) 
Brendan and Stephanie St John (Walsh) 
Michael and Ann Quigley (Kohut) 
James and Lisa Norton (McKenna) 
Paul and Melissa Barrett (Curley) 
John and Laurie Greenip (Livingstone) 
Nathaniel and Heather Palmer (Mathias) 
Simon & Dominique Fennell (Levy) 
John and Jane Steinmetz (Carey) 
Thomas and Kathleen Hansen (Shepherd) 



Richard and Joan Hosp (McCormick) 
Michael & Mary Hession (Hurley) 
Justin and Monique Smith (Armstrong) 
Edward Finn and Courtney Craft Finn 
Douglas and Heather Conroy 



MARRIAGES - 2004 



January 3, 2004, in Hingham, Michael E. Quinlan and Kristen L. Sharp of Cohasset, married by 
Gary Ludwig, Minister of the Gospel. 

February 21, 2004 in Cohasset, Andrew C. Wenzel and Heather A. Baynes of Denver, CO, married 
by Jeanne E. Armstrong, Solemnizer. 

April 3, 2004 in Cohasset, John M. Keane and Nicole M. Batts of Cohasset, married by John R. 
Mulvehill, Priest. 

April 11, 2004 in Cohasset, Christopher J. Kondracki and Kristi A. Oakes of Cohasset, married by 
John R. Mulvehill, Priest. 

April 23, 2004 in Cohasset, Edward R. Esposito of Denver, CO and Julianne M. O'Brien of Boston 
married by Paul S. Rooney, Deacon. 

May 15, 2004, in Scituate, Arthur C. Bjorklund and Judythe C. Spear of Cohasset, married by 
Marian F. Brown, Justice of the Peace. 

May 16, 2004 in Sudbury. Asa K.Suguitan and Hilary A Millar of Hull, married by Richard Griesel, 
Justice of the Peace. 

May 29, 2004 in Cohasset, James P. Brown and Elizabeth M. Gruber of Irvine, CA, married by John 
R. Mulvehill, Priest. 

May 29, 2004 in Hull, Michael Lavery and Christina M. Kelly of Cohasset, married by Ellen M. 
Clinton, Justice of the Peace. 

May 30, 2004 in Cohasset, Harry J. Judd, Jr. and Peter R. Mallen of Cohasset, married by Robert 
W. Roper, Justice of the Peace. 



99 



June 5, 2004 in Duxbury, John S. Kroeger and Amy L. Brault of Cohasset, married by Kenneth C. 
Landall, Member of the Clergy. 

June 5, 2004 in Cohasset, Christopher D. Yanovich and Sarah E Libby of Miami, FL, married by 
Michelle Schofield, Justice of the Peace. 

June 12, 2004 in Cohasset, Edward W. Lomicky of Orlando, FL and Ellen A. Sedell of Apopka, FL, 
married by Fr. John G. Maheras, Priest. 

June 12, 2004 in Cohasset, Jeffrey W. Stone of Cohasset and Elizabeth A. Mahoney of Weymouth, 
married by John R. Mulvehill, Priest. 

June 17, 2004 in Boston, Barbara J. Moore and Gail P. Otis of Cohasset, married by Kim Crawford 
Harvie, Member of the Clergy. 

June 18, 2004 in Cohasset, Jason M. Pavona and Kristan M. Baratta of Cohasset, married by Liam 
Brenner, Solemnizer. 

June 19, 2004 in Cohasset, Robert A. LeBlanc of Manchester, CT and Joyce A. Lawrence of 
Scituate, married by Phyllis Broker, Justice District Court. 

June 26, 2004 in Cohasset, Eric C. Crews and Allyson L. Lorimer of Cohasset, married by Gary A. 
Ritts, Member of the Clergy. 

June 27, 2004 in Norwell, Diane M. Waldo and Sally R. Dunn of Cohasset, married by Donna M. 
Cunio, Justice of the Peace. 

July 3, 2004 in Cohasset, Tyler D. Post and Jennifer C. Noon of Roslindale, married by E. Clifford 
Cutler, Priest. 

July 4, 2004 in Cohasset, Jeffrey J. Barrett and Kerry L. Kirkendall of San Francisco, CA, married 
by Gary A. Ritts, Member of the Clergy. 

July 4, 2004 in Scituate, John J. Delaney III and Susan A. Walewicz of Cohasset, married by Donna 
M. Cunio, Justice of the Peace. 

July 10, 2004 in Cohasset, Scott N. Theriault and Holly L. Sullivan of Cohasset, married by John R. 
Mulvehill, Priest. 

July 24, 2004 in Cohasset, Mark L. Kupsc and Jamey A. Watts of Cohasset, married by Gary A. 
Ritts, Member of the Clergy. 

August 21, 2004 in Duxbury, Sean P. Casey and Whitney M. Orwig of Cohasset, married by Jerry 
Roberts, Solemnizer. 

August 24, 2004 in Cohasset, Laurence Von Weigel and Gregory James Depoian of Cohasset, 
married by Richard R. Cunio, Justice of the Peace. 

August 28, 2004 in Cohasset, Robert F. Lydon and Margaret K. Barlow of Cohasset, married by 
Joan M. C. Cellini, Justice of the Peace. 

August 29, 2004 in Plymouth, Stephen J. Pattison and Susan M. Young of Cohasset, married by 

Rev. Paula J.Taylor, Minister. 



100 



September 4, 2004 in Cambridge, Glenn A. Pratt and Linda A. Mazzola of Cohasset, married by 
Gary A Ritts, Member of the Clergy. 

September 5, 2004 in Attleboro, Todd M. Bestick and Kristen M. Drunsic of Cohasset, married by 
Mark A. Fryrholm, Member of the Clergy. 

September 5, 2004 in Cohasset, Conor D. Mangan and Lisa Lorraine St. Don of Plymouth, married 
by Gary A. Ritts, Member of the Clergy. 

September 5, 2004 In Cohasset, Michael J. Reynolds, Jr. and Tara A. Gallagher of Hingham, 
married by John R. Mulvehill, Priest. 

September 11, 2004 in Cohasset, James A. O'Brien and Ljiljana Kovacevi of New York, NY, 
married by John R. Mulvehill, Priest. 

September 1 1 , 2004 in Scituate, R. Michael Paulson and Paula K. Miller of Cohasset, married by 
Paul V. MacDonald, Priest. 

September 11, 2004 in Cohasset, Robert W. Wallace and Jo-Anne Sandblom of Charlestown, 
married by Gary A. Ritts, Member of the Clergy. 

September 18, 2004 in Hingham, Ralph F. Schirmer and Elaine P. Gerrish of Cohasset, married by 
James F. Rafferty, Priest. 

September 18, 2004 in Cohasset, Albert F. Stefan, III of Cohasset and Barbara A. Byrne of 
Cambridge, married by Sue Anne Steffey Morrow, Clergy. 

September 24, 2004 in Cohasset, Thomas F. Palmer and Steffanie R. Fox of Weymouth, married 
by John R. Mulvehill, Priest. 

September 25, 2004 in Cohasset, Michael T. Dolan and Marnie L. DeMichele of Weymouth, 
married by Gary A. Ritts, Member of the Clergy. 

September 25, 2004 in Cohasset, Kevin J. O'Neil of No. Andover and Kerri D. Anglin of Cohasset, 
married by John R. Mulvehill, Priest. 

October 2, 2004 in Cohasset, Alan R. M. Pettie of the UK and Madlyn A. MacDonald of Cohasset, 
married by Gary A. Ritts, Clergy. 

October 9, 2004 in Cohasset, Adam L. Girard of Quincy and Laura M. Rosano of Cohasset, married 
by John R. Mulvehill, Priest. 

October 9, 2004 in Cohasset, Matthew V. Labadia and Katherine E. Ridge of Quincy, married by 
Deborah J. Pope-Lance, Clergy. 

October 9, 2004 in Cohasset, David S. Jones and Susan M. McCarty of Frisco, NC, married by E. 
Clifford Cutler, Priest. 

October 23, 2004 in Cohasset, Robert D. Vaillancourt of Pomona, NY and Karen E. Weissmann of 
Millersville, PA married by Kristen M. Connor, Justice of the Peace. 

October 23, 2004 in Bernardston, Robert A. Wall, Jr. and Jacqueline J. Delisle of Cohasset, married 
by June B. Malenfant, Justice of the Peace. 

October 24, 2004 in Cohasset, Geoffrey S. Christensen and Shannon L. Blue of Hull, married by 
Mary Lou Butler, Justice of the Peace. 



101 



October 24, 2004 in Cohasset, Chris M. Heath and Carmen M. Melendez of E. Greenwich, Rl, 
married by Osvaldo Torriente, Solemnizer. 

November 6, 2004 in Cohasset, Keith R. Beaudin of Cohasset and Celine E. Can-oil, married by 
James Brennan, Priest. 

November 13, 2004 in Cohasset, Sean P. Bishop and Leanne M. Pompeo of Plymouth, married by 
John R. Mulvehill, Priest. 

December 31, 2004 in Boston, Thomas J. Duncanson of Weymouth and Jessica A. DeLorenzo of 
Cohasset, married by H. William Adams III, Justice of the Peace. 

December 31, 2004 in Cohasset, David B. Stancavish and Dawn F. Massa-Williams of Scituate, 
married by E. Clifford Cutler, Priest. 



102 



DEATHS FOR THE YEAR 2004 



Name 

Jeanne T. Gormley 
Christine I. Janitschke 
Karin E. Johnson 
Abraham Coblentz 
Gladys Pattison 
Nancy S. Travers 
Lawrence J. Larson 
Martha A. Kerr 
John D. Dougherty, Jr. 
Dorothy W. Sharp 
Mary L.. Roy 
Anna M. Kugler 
Henry W. Ainslie 
Mary A. Doyle 
Adele Halloran 
Helen D. Higbee 
Antonio Marcella 
Alexander Penna 
Peter F. Tague, III 
Anne E. Mahoney 
Anne R Granville 
Adelaide M. Pratt 
Ann M. Hayes 
Olive B Weisenfluh 
Suzanne W Mullett 
Robert F. Troy 
Francis R. Coffey 
Margaret A. Kelley 
Sarah S. Minahan 
William B. Joyce 
Richard Emanuello 
Mary Guilfoy 
Christine M Curley 
Leonard Kupsc 
Samuel Hassan 
Louis N. Simeone 
Kathryn T. Sullivan 
Vera Vida 
Elizabeth M. Gill 
Harold R. Cushman 
Grace M. Happenny 
Thomas W. Barrett, Jr. 
William C. Allard 
Joseph D. White 
Marion C. Smith 
Alphonsine Pineau 
Leslie G. Thompson 
Mary E. Equi 
Ruth M. Judson 



Date of Death 


Age 


January 3, 2004 


86 


January 4, 2004 


100 


January 12, 2004 


96 


January 15, 2004 


85 


January 26. 2004 


91 


January 30, 2004 


70 


February 4, 2004 


88 


February 7, 2004 


86 


March 2, 2004 


62 


March 4, 2004 


93 


March 17, 2004 


86 


March 19, 2004 


97 


March 25, 2004 


85 


March 28, 2004 


80 


April 1 , 2004 


91 


April 6, 2004 


84 


April 6, 2004 


96 


April 10, 2004 


88 


April 26, 2004 


64 


May 7, 2004 


94 


May 9, 2004 


90 


May 22, 2004 


93 


May 26, 2004 


79 


May 31 , 2004 


100 


June 10, 2004 


86 


June 11, 2004. 


85 


June 13, 2004 


59 


June 21, 2004 


85 


June 25, 2004 


76 


June 25, 2004 


83 


July 4, 2004 


48 


July 16, 2004 


91 


July 25, 2004 


99 


July 27. 2004 


52 


August 4, 2004 


83 


August 4, 2004 


84 


August 1 1 , 2004 


91 


August 19, 2004 


74 


August 22, 2004 


73 


August 28, 2004 


78 


September 5, 2004 


86 


September 5, 2004 


88 


September 8, 2004 


72 


September 16, 2004 


81 


September 19, 2004 


87 


September 28, 2004 


82 


October 3, 2004 


92 


October 6, 2004 


94 


October 23, 2004 


87 



103 



Josephine F. Healy 

Barbara W. Geyer 

Jane Andrews 

Sandra R. Burens 

Gertrude K. Chase 

Donald L. Kelley 

Edna Valine 

Lucille F. McLoughlin 

William F. Murphy, Jr. 

Elizabeth E. Smith 

Mary Ann Sestito 

Jean S. Hoyler 

Matthew B. White 

Christie Mabelle Richardson 

Bartholomew P. Winn 

Dorothy M. Ingersoll 



October 26, 2004 
November 1 , 2004 
November 5, 2004 
November 8, 2004 
November 10, 2004 
November 10, 2004 
November 26, 2004 
December 1 , 2004 
December 17, 2004 
December 17, 2004 
December 18, 2004 
December 22, 2004 
December 22, 2004 
December 25, 2004 
December 29, 2004 
December 31, 2004 



77 
88 
81 
64 
82 
85 
90 
96 
53 
91 
97 
89 
70 
99 
70 
94 



104 



PROSPECTIVE JUROR LIST 



Pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 234A, Section 15, the 

Prospective Juror List is available in the Town Clerk's office with the names 

of those residents who may be summoned for juror service. 

This information is available for public inspection during normal office hours. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Marion L. Douglas 
Town Clerk 



105 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Submitted herewith is my annual report for the fiscal year ended June 30, 
2004. This report includes the following: 

GENERAL FUND 

1. Balance Sheet (Combined) 

2. Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance 

3. Report of Appropriations and Expenditures 

4. Statement of Revenues, Budget vs. Actual 

5. Statement of State and County Assessments 
SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS 

1. Balance Sheet (Combined) 

2. Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance, 
Town Special Revenue Funds 

3. Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance, 
School Special Revenue Funds 

SEWER FUNDS - NORTH AND CENTRAL COHASSET 

1 . Balance Sheet (Combined) 

2. Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance 

3. Report of Appropriations and Expenditures 
WATER FUND 

1. Balance Sheet (Combined) 

2. Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Retained Earnings 

3. Report of Appropriations and Expenditures 
CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND 

1 . Balance Sheet (Combined) 

2. Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance 
TRUST FUNDS 

1. Balance Sheet (Combined) 

2. Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance 
LONG TERM DEBT GROUP OF ACCOUNTS 

1 . Statement of Long Term Debt 

2. Statement of Debt Authorized and Unissued 
OTHER REPORTS 

1 . Schedule of Reserve Fund Transfers 

2. Community Preservation Fund 

3. Schedule of Wages and Salaries Paid 

Respectfully Submitted, 
J. Michael Buckley 



106 





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109 



STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES 
AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE 
GENERAL FUND 
FISCAL YEAR 2004 



Total Encumbrances 

Other Financing Sources (Uses)) 
Operating Transfers In 
Operating Transfers Out 
Appropriation Deficits 
Miscellaneous Adjustments 

Total Financing Sources (Uses)) 

Excess of Revenues Over Expenditures 

Unreserved Fund Balance July 1, 2003 

Unreserved Fund Balance June 30, 2004 



Revenue: 






Property Taxes 


20.484,217 




State Aid 


2,203,205 




Excise Taxes 


1,164,757 




Other Local Receipts 


1.976,308 




Total Revenue 




25,828,487 


Less: 






Expenditures: 






General Government 


1,697,459 




Public Safety 


3,692,847 




Schools 


11,597,031 


• 


Public Works 


1,730,491 




Public Health 


103,094 




Human Services 


164,248 




Culture & Recreation 


527,593 




Debt Service 


3,764,050 




Employee Benefits & Insurance 


2,863,697 




State and County Assessments 


761,146 




Total Expenditures 




26,901,656 


Encumbrances: 






Encumbrances 


2,581,157 




Reserve For Expenditure (FY05) 


145,284 




Reserve For Expenditure (FY04) 


(300,000) 




Encumbrances-Prior Year 


(2,842,312) 





178,992 
(96,054) 
25,650 
4,953 



(415,871) 



113,541 
(543,757) 
1,112,880 



$569,123 



110 





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ENERALFUNI 


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BIJDGRTVS. 


ACTIJAT. 


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% 






Budget 


Actual 


Uncollected 


Collected 














TAX 


LEVY 
























Real Estate 


20,415,093 


20,070,033 


(345,060) 


98.3% 




Personal Property 


156,088 


166,830 


10,742 


106.9% 




Pro Forma Tax 





8,081 


8,081 


- 




Tax Liens 





166,859 


166.859 


- 




Rollback Tax 





9,428 


9.428 


- 




Deferred Tax 





62,986 


62.986 


- 
















Total Tax Levy 


20,571,181 


20,484,217 


(86,964) 


99.6% 


























STAl 


rEAlD 
























School Chapter 70 


1,147,273 


1,147,273 





100.0% 




Additional Assistance 


166,099 


166,099 





100.0% 




School Construction 


498,663 


498,663 





100.0% 




Lottery 


365.106 


365,106 





100.0% 




Veterans' Exemptions 


7,363 


7,475 


112 


101.5% 




Elderly Exemptions 


5,932 


13,174 


7.242 


222.1% 




Charter School Reimb. 


17,220 


5,390 


(11,830) 


31.3% 




Miscellaneous 





25 


25 


- 
















Total State Aid 


2.207,656 


2,203.205 


(4,451) 


99.8% 


























LOCAL RECEIPTS 
























Motor Vehicle Excise 


1,044,904 


1,164,757 


119,853 


.111.5% 




Boat Excise 


7,000 


8,168 


1,168 


116.7% 




Betterments - Sewer 


503,297 


559,283 


55,986 


111.1% 




Committed Interest 


75,000 


71,657 


(3.343) 


95.5% 




Penalty & Interest on Taxes - 










Property Taxes 


40,000 


38,692 


(1.308) 


96.7% 




Liens 


35,000 


94,043 


59.043 


268.7% 




Excise 


5,000 


4,397 


(603) 


87.9% 




Facility Stickers 


50.000 


86,078 


36.078 


172.2% 




Trash Bags 


115,000 


109,795 


(5.205) 


95.5% 




Fees- 












Board Of Selectmen 


5,000 


4,006 


(994) 


80.1% 




Town Clerk 


7,000 


8,353 


1.353 


119.3% 




Treasurer/Collector 


25,000 


24,763 


(237) 


99.1% 




Assessors 


2,000 


2,783 


783 


139.2% 




ZBA 


3,000 


3,815 


815 


127.2% 




Planning Board 


2,000 


3,442 


1.442 


172.1% 




Conservation Commission 


5,000 


8,599 


3.599 


172.0% 




Police Dept 


11,000 


15.885 


4,885 


144.4% 




Ambulance 


204,211 


.268,596 


64,385 


131.5% 




Fire Department Other 


3,500 


3,890 


390 


111.1% 


Weights & Measures 


1,000 


1,335 


335 


133.5% 


Dog Officer 


100 


175 


75 


175.0% 



111 





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Biiaflstestvs. 


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Uncollected 


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Recycling 


10,000 


11,181 


1,181 


111.8% 




Public Works 


100 


255 


155 


255.0% 




Transfer Station Fees 


5,000 


17,227 


12,227 


344.5% 




School 





466 


466 


- 




Library Fees 


3,000 


8,632 


5.m 


287.7% 




Cemetery Fees 


13,200 


17,850 


A^ 


135.2% 




Recreation Fees 


102,000 


76,222 


(25.778) 


74.7% 




In Lieu of Tax 





1,271 


1,271 


- 




Licenses & Permits - 












Board Of Health 


30,000 


28,501 


(1.499) 


95.0% 




Building 


87,000 


112,090 


25,090 


128.8% 




Plumbing 


7,000 


9,961 


2,961 


142.3% 




Gas 


4,000 


5,003 


1,003 


125.1% 




Electrical 


13.000 


16,555 


3,555 


127.3% 




Dog 


7,000 


6,569 


(431) 


93.8% 




Alcoholic Beverage 


18,000 


18,645 


645 


103.6% 




Selectmen Other 


3,000 


4,816 


1.816 


160.5% 




Selectmen Road Openings 


1,000 


2.060 


1,060 


206.0% 




Unclassified 





4,931 


4,931 


- 




Insurance Refunds 





700 


700 


- 




Fines & Forfeits - 












Parking 


21,000 


25,830 


4,830 


123.0% 




Court Fines 


7,000 


6.400 


(600) 


91.4% 




Registry Fines 


22,000 


16,143 


(5,858) 


73.4% 




Tailings 





6,589 


6,589 






Investment Income 


264,171 


199,754 


(64.417) 


75.6% 




Hartwr Fees 


50.000 


61,003 


11.003 


122.0% 




Indirect Costs 


90,288 





(90^88) 


0.0% 
















Total Local Receipts 


2,901,771 


3,141,164 


239,383 


108.2% 




























GRAND TOTAL 


25,680,608 


25,828,587 


147,978 


100.6% 















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STATE AND COUNTY ASSESSMENTS 
BUDGET VS. ACTUAL 



Account 

County Tax 

Registry Non Renewals 

Retired Teachers Health Insurance 

Mosquito Control Project 

Air Pollution Control 

Metro Area Planning Council 

Mass Bay Transit Authority 

Charter Schools 

Special Education 

Totals 



Estimated 


Actual 


Charges 


Charges 


$87,078 


$87,078 


6,380 


5.140 


378,527 


385,740 


29,388 


29.899 


2,947 


2,947 


1,889 


1,889 


145,766 


145,766 


132,192 


90,124 


8.884 


12,563 


$793,051 


$761,146 



124 



CENTRAL COHASSET SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND 
STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 



Revenue: 



541,200 



3,285 






544,485 


551,111 





44,198 






(595,309) 




(50,824) 







• 




50,824 








User Charges 
Miscellaneous Revenue 
State Rate Relief Assistance 

Total Revenue 

Expenditures 
Depredation Expense 
Encumbrances 
Transfer to General Fund 

Total Expenditures & Encumbrances 

Excess of Revenue O ver Expenditures 

UrKJesignated F und BalarK» July 1 , 2003 

Add: Prior year Encumbrances closed 
Transfers from General Fund 

Undesignated F und Balance June 30, 2004 



NORTH COHASSET SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND 
STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 



Revenue: 

User Charges 
Miscellaneous Revenue 
State Rate Relief Assistance 

Total Revenue 

Expenditures 
Depreciation Expense 
Encumbrances 
Transfer to General Fund 

Total Expenditures & Encumbrances 

Excess of Revenue O ver Expenditures 

Undesignated F und Balance July 1 , 2003 

Add: Prior year Encumbrances closed 
Transfers from General Fund 

Undesignated F und Balance June 30, 2004 



202,989 

5,684 








208,673 


80.925 

37.300 



14,794 






(133,019) 




75,654 














75,654 



125 



WATER ENTERPRISE FUND 
STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE 



Revenue: 

User Charges 

User Charges (Accrual Adjustment) 
Water Liens 
Water Fees 
Penalties & Interest 

State Reimbursements (Reserve Account) 
Hydrant Charges 

Total Revenue 

Expenditures 
Debt Service 
Encumbrances 

Total Expenditures & Encumbrances 

Excess of Revenue Over Expenditures 

Retained Eamings July 1 , 2003 

Less: Prior Year Accrual 

Retained Eamings June 30, 2004 



1,597,890 

176,905 

8,607 

46,044 

20,233 

9,964 








1,859.642 


887,114 

1,012,676 








(1,899,790) 




(40.148) 




40,148 









(0) 



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TRUST FUNDS 
STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE 
nSCAL YEAR 2004 







Balance 


Donatksns & 


Withdrawals 


Investment 


Due To/ 


1 
Balance 






Julyl 


Receipts 




Income 


From 


June 30 


PARKS AND PLAYGROUNDS 














Billings Park Fund 


001 


1.727.15 






(23.68) 




1,703.47 


Billings Common Fund 


002 


1.522.52 






(20.88) 




1.501.64 


H.W. Wadleigh Parle Fund 


003 


8,078.08 






(110.80) 




7,967.28 


Wheelwright Park Fund 


004 


22,484.05 






(308.36) 




22,175.69 


Edith M. Bates Fund 


005 


9,825.44 






(134.75) 




9,690.69 


CEMETERIES 
















Perpetual Care-Woodside Cemetery 


006 


166.267.00 


7.500.00 


608.00 


(1,997.62) 


(945.00) 


170,216.38 


Perpetual Care-Woodside Cemetery(Van) 


006 


31.826.66 






6,018.90 




37,645.56 


Perpetual Care-Beechwood Cemetery 


007 


11.502.41 


500.00 




(137.25) 




11,865.16 


Beechwood Cemetery Association 


008 


5,661.51 






(76.15) 




5,475.36 


Estate of Harry E. Wiltjur 


009 


9,518.16 






(130.53) 




9,387.63 


Charlotte Lincoln Bell Memorial Fund 


010 


41.952.47 






(575.34) 




41,377.13 


Isadora B. Newey Fund 


011 


33.673.72 






(461.79) 




33.211.93 


Cedar Street Cemetery 


012 


5,399.79 






(74.05) 




5.325.74 


SCHOOLS 








"^ 








Riptey Fund 


020 


8,058.78 






(110.53) 




7,948.25 


James W. Nichols Scholarship Fund 


022 


3.354.60 




150.00 


(52.16) 




3,152.44 


Major William Arthur Scholarship Fund 


024 


8.799.24 




400.00 


(137.07) 




8.262.17 


Alice and Walter Shuebruk Scholarship Fund 023 


129.376.75 




5,000.00 


(1,979.32) 




122.397.43 


William Ripley Jr.. Athletic Fund 


025 


20.488.88 




600.00 


(305.58) 




19,583.30 


John F. Creamer Scholarship Fund 


027 


1.391.45 






(19.08) 




1.372.37 


Margaret M. Hanjy Scholarship Fund 


021 


252.285.38 




500.00 


(3.480.38) 




248.305.00 


hielen & Relcom Stevens Scholarship Fund 


026 


207,912.22 




10.000.00 


(3,261.38) 




194,650.84 


Noel Ripley Scholarship 


042 


37.270.49 


11.700.00 


500.00 


(51.90) 




48.418.59 


Bourke Corcoran Scholarship 


028 


12.648.32 


13,897.41 


26.994.82 


449.09 


300.00 


300.00 


VOLUNTARY CHECKOFF FUNDS 
















Scholarship Fund 


102 


1,533.04 


133.00 




(15.58) 




1,650.46 


Education Fund 


104 


2.229.18 


425.00 




(13.14) 




2.641.04 


Dtsat)led Seniors Fund 


106 


3.177.26 


669.72 




(16.11) 




3.830.87 


OTHER 
















Stat>ilization Fund 


031 


921.308.79 


28,769.00 




20.525.77 




970.603.56 


Conservation Fund 


030 


34.096.45 






281.05 




34.377.50 


Beechwood Improvement Association 


032 


7.877.98 






168.32 




8.046.30 


Beechwood Ball Park Fund 


040 


388.51 






(5.32) 




383.19 


Retirement Furul 


038 


705.308.78 




80.000.00 


12,987.82 




638.296.60 


Town Pump Maintenance 


033 


2,163.27 






46.22 




2.209.49 


Reed Comer Trust Fund 


034 


150.45 






3.21 




153.66 


Arts Lottery Fund 


043 


13,682.94 




1,850.00 


292.33 


(1,850.00) 


10.275.27 


Captains' Walk Fund 


044 


9,600.92 




364.04 


205.11 


(364.04) 


9,077.96 


Historical Military Tmst 


048 


764.79 






(10.48) 




754.31 


Hagerty Trust 


046 


33,334.12 






338.47 


(31.213.33) 


2,469.26 


PAUL PRATT MEMORIAL LIBRARY 
















Vanguard Star Fund 


037 


710.815.58 


18,540.00 


28.660.00 


74.548.07 




775.243.65 


TRUST FUND TOTALS 


3.477.347.13 


82,134.13 


155,626.86 


102,355.13 


(34.072.37) 


3,472.137.16 



128 



SCHEDULE OF RESERVE FUND TRANSFERS 
FISCAL YEAR 2004 



Appropriation 


07/01/03 


Annual Town Meeting 


100,000.00 


Appropriation 


11/17/03 


Special Town Meeting 


68.000.00 


Appropriation 


11/17/03 


Special Town Meeting 


25.000.00 






Total Available 


.$ 193.000.00 


Selectmen 


07/17/03 


Cook Property 


25,000.00 


Fire 


09/25/03 


Equipment Maintenance 


3.495.00 


Elder Affairs 


12/04/03 


Printing 


3,000.00 


Selectmen 


12/04/03 


Expenses (Confidential) 


10,500.00 


Selectmen 


01/08/04 


Cook Property 


25,000.00 


Public Works 


03/27/04 


Milliken Field 


10,817.00 


Elder Affairs 


03/27/04 


Copy Machine 


5,523.00 


Town Manager 


06/10/04 


Acting Salary 


5,160.00 


Selectmen 


06/30/04 


Telephone 


6,000.00 


Finance 


06/30/04 


Payroll Services 


2,000.00 


Plumbing & Gas 


06/30/04 


Inspections 


1,440.00 


Fire 


06/30/04 


Overtime 


8,632.00 


Medicare 


06/30/04 


Expenses 


13,767.00 


Life Insurance 


06/30/04 


Expenses 


1,166.00 


Property Insurance 


06/30/04 


Expenses 


3,500.00 


Town Meeting 


03/27/04 


Investigation 


- 


Town Meeting 


03/27/04 


School Utilities 


68,000.00 






Total Transfers 


$ 193.000.00 






Balance 


$ 



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c 

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CO 

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15 
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130 



DEBT STATEMENT 
FISCAL YEAR 2004 



PtotMl 


AfflOiM 
oflau* 


CM>of 

IMIM 


Tonn 


MnM 


OuMMdkv 
Balnoe 


FV04 
PiMpai 
AdtMora 


FY04 
Prindp^ 
PavTTMnt 


oanoM 

Ouaimli* 

Baknoa 


T«> 1 «wv ntJtnmhrwim b^j^ . 


208,000 


03ni«4 


lOyn. 


6J0 


20.000 




20.000 




FkaPunvar 





Hauwly ProiMtty 


460.000 


a2/i6«e 


leyn. 


4.0M.06 


287,000 




27.000 


2404)00 


Finl Tanki t RanmMkira 


200.416 


tajMiaa 


lOyra. 


4.0(M.66 


71,216 




32.000 


38,816 


AMMc FWkte SumtOTMrt 


00.700 


02/16m 


16 yn 


4iXM.«6 


62J00 




6.700 


48.100 


AMMcFMk 


776.000 


02/1 6«e 


16 yn 


4.004.S6 


387,200 




65.400 


331 «)0 


PiMc Worts Owaa* 


782.000 


02/1 6M 


16 yn. 


4JKHJK 


461.786 




43.300 


408.486 


S«Mrl4l 


70.000 


0V16W 


20 yn. 


4.66^.10 


48.081 




6.861 


41,110 


UndHCUwpkig 


1.316.000 


o»i6/ee 


20 yn. 


4.66-6.10 


086,220 




84.480 


804.730 




«.a«o.ooo 


1(V16«8 


ISyn. 


3.006.78 


6506,000 




400.000 


8.186,000 


N»w E)«n»nl»Y School S>MiMmi« 1 


2SO.0OO 


10/16/08 


10 yn. 


3.aM.76 


216.000 




10.000 


206,000 


PlMc Worta Ow^* WMV U^l 


eo.coo 


icvism 


10 yn. 


3.S04.7S 


38.000 




6.000 


30.000 


PlAAc Wtofta Omo* 8<vplafTNrt 


230.000 


10/16/08 


18 yn. 


3B06.78 


178.000 




13.000 


183.000 


Hflfbor DivUyiiiQ 


76.000 


1(V16«8 


12 yn. 


3«^e.76 


48AI0 




6.000 


42.000 


S^BOl Tactmkigy 


IWMO 


ion6m 


Byn. 


3.B0-6.76 


60M0 




10,000 


404)00 


SOTMTltlMWPATOM? 


180.040 


1(M)«M0 


20iffs. 




186,286 




8.047 


167,238 


School Pto¥*« 


260.000 


12A>UBe 


4yn. 


3.7M.26 


80M0 




OOMO 





N—rEI««n«nM«Y School CmnjWkjii 2 


244.600 


12/Dirae 


16 yn. 


3.T66.26 


180,000 




16,000 


1864)00 


SchiMSI TwhnolDgy 


160.000 


i2X)im 


4yn. 


3.7V6J6 


40M0 




40.000 







120.000 


i2ni/ge 


4yn. 


3.76-6.26 


ao/joo 




30.000 





FtaodCofttsI 


200,000 


i2A)me 


16 yn. 


37W26 


200,000 




20.000 


180,000 


Hflrtnr MoofTiQS 


60.000 


i2xii/ge 


Byn. 


3.76-626 


80.000 




10.000 


60.000 


FkvTfuda 


300.000 


lijcn/oo 


6yn. 


4J04i» 


270.000 




46.000 


2254)00 




10«M0 


12«1/D0 


Byn. 


4.30-6i)0 


80.000 




16.000 


86.000 


School Taohnology 


160.000 


12«1/D0 


4yn. 


*JXy*M 


70,000 




36.000 


36.000 


Snnrlii 


80.000 


01/1602 


16 yn^ 


tXtAJK 


70.000 




10.000 


80.000 


Hoowly niufjorty 


206.000 


01/16/02 


10 yn. 


2.26-4.10 


226.000 




30.000 


1864100 


DspoiviwnMl Epiripnvit 


100.000 


01/1 6«2 


4yn. 


2.2S-3.40 


i40Ma 




60.000 


80.000 


CcfflMvy ComDuoBon 


760.000 


01/16« 


Byn. 


2.26^.10 


860.000 




BO.OOO 


680,000 


Fon« AMnijo Sktoaali 


100,000 


01/1 6«2 


6yn. 


2:2t-}M 


80,000 




20.000 


804)00 


School pm*« 


160.000 


08/1 S«4 


20 yn. 


3.00-6 JM 




158.000 




168.000 




10.730.000 


0W16XM 


20 yn. 


3.0(^6.00 




18,720.000 




18,7204)00 


LMoLHguoFMdi 


164.000 


08M6«4 


Dyra. 


3J)M.OO 




184.800 




184,800 




7034)00 


08/1 6«4 


10 yn. 


3.00-4ilO 




703,000 




7034)00 


Ubmy 


060.000 


Oa/16«4 


17 yn. 


S-OMilO 




8604)00 




860,000 


P()lo*4nnaMon 


860.000 


0e/16«4 


14 yn. 


3.006 J)0 




0604100 




860.000 


Ccnkal Smw nm 


06.268 


08/1 4«4 


20 yn. 


SWUM 




08.288 




88,288 




100.210 


0W16A4 


2vn. 


3M 




100,210 




108,210 




122.902 


0W16A4 


3yn. 


3J»-9M 




122,002 




122,002 



JOTMJS - TAX LEW FUNDS) 



13.7S8.48t 



18.784.800 



32.312.878 



131 



DEBTSTKreUBKT 
FISCAL YEAR 2004 






Amoirt 

OflMU« 



07«1/D3 
Outitandki( 



"-*-"— **TflTfrr I iW*V~-- 

Sbvte Pond Sew 

SbvtoPond Smmt 

Smli Pond 8«ww MM>AT Se-33 

SkMi Pond Smmt l>nW>AT se-34 
rl«|ff>ATB7-3« 
rMWPAToe-(S 

Ommmrm Smmt MWPAT BS«6 
rMWPATSe-lOe 
rMWPATSe-lOe 

State Pond S«Mr MWPAT ee-33A 

8nb Pond Samr l«M>AT «»-»iA 

Sk^b Pond Sm»w MMPAT se-MA 
rMM>AT 06-10 
rtMff>AT 00-11 
rMWPAT 00-03 

DomtomtSmmrtir*tPAroo-M 



306.000 oe/ism 

32S.0O0 10/1S«e 

1.030,000 i2X)am 

i.eeo.400 i2X)««e 

840.600 ^^l0U9e 

187.400 12Aem 

281.700 IZ/NW 

i.esoMO iQrwm 

i,a2SM0 lomwee 

iMe.327 iini«o 

2,07ZM1 ll/O-UOO 

608.247 lim/OO 

2^01.772 IIADWO 

2J01.S83 11/01X)0 

277X3 IIAIXW 

4.370.346 IVOIXW 

1.104.S00 12X)tnO 

638.000 12A1/D0 

eOOJMO 01/16A2 

TOrM£ • BEnBWB(T3 • TAX LEVY PUNDG) 




22.028,081 



W.750 


218M0 


20,000 


2KM0 


86.000 


1;618«I0 


78,100 


1,333.400 


37.200 


801.100 


BJOO 


147/400 


11«0 


206.800 


87,728 


1J84,084 


87,733 


1.368 W3 


784180 


1^43.200 


102,168 


1,771.074 


8«6 


481,006 


83,538 


2,017,380 


Mjxa 


2X125.817 


0,818 


208330 


178,678 


3356.188 


67.174 


028.188 


27«6 


461.812 


40.000 


620300 


mi .708 


20338376 



"'-^° fVJ— .— ■ 1 





2,600,000 


o\n^m 


34 yn. 


530 


867300 




73300 


684.000 




1.000,000 


imiAO 


ISyra. 


4.00 


406300 




180.000 


306300 


VMvlWnPiotMtlta 


106300 


owisno 


8y™. 


436-0.10 


40300 




25300 


16300 


Sy«KiR«(idra 1006-8 


2/450,000 


00/16M 


20 yn. 


435-8.10 


1,708,080 




123.»10 


1,606370 


OVKKtJmtfl S^MNni 


800.000 


ion Me 


IByra. 


3304.75 


700,000 


' 


60.000 


860300 




1.430300 


12A1/S8 


ISyim. 


3.7S*i6 


1.136300 




86300 


1340300 


SYVtWn RVVD^MRIWlta 


2,410.000 


12«1«) 


20yi». 


4.30-830 


2.180300 




120.000 


2340300 


WoVPI 


160300 


01/16«2 


16 yn. 


2.25-430 


140300 




10300 


130300 




2.817,000 


owism 


20 yn. 


33fr630 



730S3M 


2317300 





2,817.000 


TOTALS - WATBt REVBWE RMOFO 


2317308 


8««31« 


8308378 


ORANDTOTAL 










42.T403Z7 


22.401388 


23273*4 


•2,214323 



AMOUMTgAUTMnPPen^llDUNagUlip 



School Rwh.iiimUuii PiMnninQ 

S<»oo) RjnrwBMw 

NwUbracY 

NewUkrwY 

Jttfno* Brook Mood Coiftol 

BemMPiaooty 

Jwna* Braok Flood CocXdI 

LbwyRoof 

Wstof Syvtvm ■iv'WMniBrto 

Cook Prooort)^ 

D4psf%TMntiri BQi^nMrt 

UBlehtatorSMMr 

Kni Straat Land 

W»ttr Symm ln uu *»i n « »» 

Water Svalwn ImpKivvnwnto 

West Comar Cutvol 

Nemxivaa Oralnasa 

Jhtws Lans Eaownflrt 

AUhortiad ft UniMuad 



03/27«e 


200300 


i2«vge 


234300 


OSQSXW 


26300300 


03/2S«0 


2.280300 


11/06W1 




iixem 


1200300 


1 VI era 


760300 


ii/ia«2 


160300 


03«a«3 


26 300 


03QW03 


2.400300 


11/17A>3 


4300300 


11/17«3 


018300 


0307/04 


100300 


03«7»4 


400000 


0307/04 


3300300 


030704 


21,882.180 


03Q7/04 


26.000 


03O7«4 


100300 


0307/04 


84.200 



84378380 



132 









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138 



REPORT OF THE COLLECTOR 



In Fiscal 2004, the Treasurer/Collector's office processed approximately 
12,200 Real Estate tax bills, 805 Personal Property tax bills, 8,388 Motor Vehicle 
Excise tax bills and 10,385 Water/Sewer bills. 

The Treasurer/Collector's office continued to accept tax payments via the 
internet with now account for approximately 3% of all real estate, motor vehicle 
excise and water / sewer bill payments with the usage increasing monthly. To pay 
via the internet simply log onto www.mcc.net . look up your real estate, motor 
vehicle and or water/sewer bill, and send the payment to the Town either directly 
from your bank account or by credit card. The cost to users of making payments 
from a bank account is only 25 cents (less than a stamp). The cost of using a 
credit card varies but averages 3% and is paid directly to the credit card company 
by the user. The participation has been growing steadily each billing cycle and 
feedback has been extremely positive. 

Once again considerable efforts were made to contact taxpayers and collect 
taxes in arrears. Tax liens were recorded on all subsequent Fiscal Year 2004 
taxes totaling $77,948.19. Subsequent taxes are those outstanding balances for 
properties that were already in Tax Title. In addition, new Tax Liens were recorded 
on all outstanding Fiscal Year 2003 real estate taxes, totaling $17,897.32. Even 
with these additions to the Tax Title account, the Town received $147,860.39 in 
payments, reducing the previous $307,329.79 to $255,314.91. 

Special thanks to Assistant Treasurer-Collector Linda Litchfield and 
Assistant to the Treasurer Jane Henderson, who were instrumental in continuing 
the progress of the department. 

Attached is a spreadsheet outlining receivable activity for Fiscal Year 2004. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Joseph A. DiVito, Jr. 
Treasurer-Collector 



139 



REPORT OF THE TOWN TREASURER 

In Fiscal 2004 as in years past, the Treasurer-Collector's office continued an 
investment strategy that balances the safety, liquidity, and yield of the 
Town's funds. During fiscal year 2004 investment yields were at an all-time 
low. The Treasurer's office aggressively pursued maintaining the highest 
yields with all of its banks; however, even with these best efforts there was a 
considerable decrease in investment income over the previous year. 

In Fiscal Year 2004, the Town continued to implement the provisions of both 
MGL Chapter 60, Sections 3C and 3D, which allows the Town to include a 
check-off insert with tax bills. As of June 30, 2004, the following funds have 
been collected: 

Town Scholarship Fund: $1,650.46 

Local Education Fund: $ 2,641 .04 

Elderly & Disabled Taxation Fund: $ 3,830.87 

The Scholarship Fund will provide secondary school tuition assistance to 
deserving Town residents. These funds will be in addition to scholarships 
currently available to Town residents. 

The Educational Fund will provide supplemental educational funding for 
Cohasset Public Schools. Additionally, funds may be used for existing adult 
literacy programs. 

The Elderly / Disabled Fund will provide property tax relief for elderly and 
disabled Cohasset taxpayers who meet specific criteria established by the 
Elderly / Disabled Fund Committee. 

Unfortunately the annual donations to these funds have been minimal. 
Awards from the above funds will be made in future years once there are 
sufficient sums available. 

Also in late Fiscal Year 2004 efforts began to reorganize the department 
and transfer the payroll / benefits function back into the Treasurer- 
Collector's office from the Town Manager's office in order to improve service 
and oversight. . 



140 



The following is a listing of the Town's Fiscal Year 2004 General Fund Cash 
balance: 



BALANCE IN TREASURY JULY 1, 2003 

Total Receipts for Fiscal Year 2004 

Paid Warrants 

BALANCE IN TREASURY JUNE 30, 2004 

DEPOSITORIES 

Abington Savings 
Eastern Bank 
Hingham Institution 
Boston Safe Deposit 
Fleet Bank 
MMDT 

Pilgrim Cooperative 
Rockland Trust 
State Street Bank 
Century Bank 
Cash in Drawer 

TOTAL DEPOSITORIES 



$ 14,577,149.78 
$111,864,410.08 
$ 96,438,789.31 
$ 30,002,770.55 



$ 249,969.97 

$ 18,720.60 

$ 19,037,265.48 

$ 890,285.84 

$ 115,248.72 

$ 280.625.50 

$ 1,699,170.67 

$ 1,251,084.69 

$ 39,615.73 

$ 6,420,633.35 

$ 150.00 

$ 30,002,770.55 



The following is a listing of the Town's Fiscal Year 2004 Trust Funds balance: 
DEPOSITORIES 



Abington Savings 

Hingham Institution 

MMDT 

Pilgrim Cooperative 

Rockland Trust 

Vanguard 

TOTAL DEPOSITORIES 



$ 454,961.12 
$ 396,664.66 
$ 33,672.59 
$ 569,417.14 
$1,238,404.81 
$ 813,089.21 

$ 3,506,209.53 



Respectfully Submitted 

Joseph A. DiVito, Jr. 
Treasurer-Collector 



141 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



The property tax levy is the revenue a community can raise through real and 
personal property taxes. The property tax levy is the largest source of revenue for 
the Town of Cohasset. The property tax levy for Fiscal Year 2004 was 
$20,572,804.70, representing 62% of the $33,198,552.92 budget. 

It is the responsibility of the Assessors' Office to establish fair market value for all 
properties in the Town of Cohasset. During Fiscal Year 2004, the Assessors' 
Office conducted inspections of approximately 30% of the homes and 
condominiums in the town as part of a three-year cyclical inspection program. The 
Assessors conducted an analysis of all arms-length sales that occurred in the town 
during calendar year 2002. The sales trends in this appreciating real estate market 
were defined and interim adjustments were made to properties throughout the 
town. The adjustments were made in accordance with Department of Revenue 
(DOR) guidelines. The total valuation of the town was $1 ,730,261 ,119 with a tax 
rate of $1 1 .89 per thousand dollars of assessment. 

At its Annual Meeting, the Town Meeting body voted to favorably modify the 
income and asset requirements for Statutory Exemption for Persons Over 70 
Years of Age, in accordance with Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, 
Section 5, Clause 41 C. 

The Board of Assessors would like to acknowledge Deputy Assessor Mary Quill, 
Assistant Assessor Debra Krupczak, and Administrative Assistants Devon Noonan 
and Ellen Warner for their efforts throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Elsa J. Miller, Chairman 
Mary E. Granville, Member 
Michael C. Patrolia, Cleri< 



J 



142 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH 

Board membership remained the same. Upon re-organization, Stephen N. Bobo 
remained Chainnan, Peggy S. Chapman, RN, became the Clerk, and Robin M. 
Lawrence, DDS, became the Member. Joseph R. Godzik, VIVID, remains as 
Health Agent on a part-time basis, with Tara N. Tradd as Office Manager/Health 
Inspector. The public health nurse continues to be Judy Fitzsimmons, RN, 
assisted by Janet Bennett, RN. 

A major Board initiative was developing the Town's Comprehensive Wastewater 
Management Plan. The Plan has been approved by the Board and is scheduled to 
be presented at the April 2005 Spring Town Meeting. 

The Board has continued its leadership in wastewater issues. However, the Board 
has not met planning goals for year two of the Town's Stormwater Management 
Plan. The Board passed an illegal discharge regulation as required by the Town's 
Stormwater Management Plan but has been unable to secure Town approval of a 
pre- and post-construction land disturbance bylaw. Further, budgetary constraints 
have frustrated a more active catch-basin and storm-drain management plan and 
upgrade program. The Board requested additional staff from the DPW for such 
work, which was not approved. The Board hopes to inaugurate a volunteer 
program to augment the DPW efforts in catch-basin management and identification 
in 2005. The Board participates in the Wastewater Study Committee, which will 
advise the Selectmen on best wastewater management options for the Town. 

Water quality testing at Bassing Beach required the closure of the beach for 
swimming for a period during the summer. While no individual test resulted in 
closure, a prolonged period of testing resulted in exceeding a geometric mean, 
which also requires closure. The source of this microbiological pollution is 
unknown. 

The town gathers environmental data by a volunteer monitoring program 
conceived by the Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs, 
which has provided grants to organizations within the Town to support water 
quality monitoring. Accordingly, the work accomplished by volunteers 
significantly furthers the Town goals and objectives as well as State 
environmental concerns. 

The student volunteer monitoring program being carried out by the High 
School teachers, students, and concerned volunteers is a mainstay of an 
increasingly sophisticated assessment of Town water bodies and forms the 
basis of the Board's continuing program. Under Board sponsorship, and 
using standard methods developed into a quality assurance program 
handbook for Cohasset, the students are able to not only take samples, but 
to conduct analysis of parameters such as fecal coliform, total suspended 
solids, enterococci, salinity, etc. These assessments, paid for by the 



143 



Cohasset Center for Student Coastal Research (CCSCR), are confirmed 
using split sample techniques with G & L Laboratories of Quincy, MA. Such 
data are invaluable in assisting the Board in the planning of remediation 
activities. 

The Board received funds for emergency preparedness from the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health. These funds were used for 
training staff, upgrading the office communications system, and purchasing 
a defibrillator for Town Hall. 

The Board is grateful to all who assist with programs and clinics through volunteer 
efforts and monetary donations throughout the year. 



Keep Well Clinics 


437 


Adult Immunization 


1020 


Diabetic / Cholesterol Screening 


120 


Health Fair 


125 


Communicable Disease Follow Up 


8 


Home Nursing Visits 


393 


Office Nursing Visits 


831 


Total Nursing Visits 


1224 



The Board received the following revenue during 2004: 



Licenses and Permits: 

Witnessing Percolation Testing: 

Disposal System Construction Permit: 

Other: 

PHN Gift Account: 

Medicare Reimbursement: 



$ 9.435.00 
$ 14,206.00 
$ 6,530.00 
$ 7,630.28 
$ 526.00 
$ 7,525.30 



Respectfully submitted, 

Stephen N. Bobo, Chairman 
Peggy S. Chapman, RN, CS, Clerl< 
Robin M. Lawrence, DDS, MPH, Member 



144 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE COUNCIL ON ELDER AFFAIRS 

The more things change, the more they stay the same. This was the CEA's 
reality in the past year. While interest grew and expanded into new activities 
such as the Book Club, Strength and Stretch for over 50, Walking Club, and 
Chair Yoga, we continued to be challenged by our limited space and 
dwindling financial resources. Likewise, key areas of concern for our elders 
continued with ever-changing fields of medical Insurance, soaring 
prescription costs, and the growing financial burdens of maintaining a home 
in Cohasset while, again, resources for assistance were choked by a failing 
economy. 

We rose to such challenges by bringing in grant-funded programs and connecting 
with volunteer services to augment what the staff could offer. Our SHINE (Serving 
the Health Insurance Need of Elders) is very active. Here at the CEA, we are 
fortunate to have a SHINE Counselor, Carol Barrett, who is available at all times to 
assist seniors and their family members with any and all health insurance 
concerns. Many people feel free to just stop by the Center and ask for information. 
Carol is always here and willing to answer all their questions. The SHINE program 
and Carol are a tremendous resource for our seniors. 

The other program that we were able to tap into was the S.S E.S. 3-B grant money 
for the senior visitation program in which Carol Barrett matches volunteers with 
seniors who are at home and benefit from having a new friend. Under the 3-E 
grant, Carol also provided an education series to elders on medication interaction 
here in Cohasset, Scituate, and Milton. This is the fifth leading cause of death for 
elders and it is so important that people are educated to the opportunities and 
assistance available to them in taking medication. 

We continued to participate as the transportation program for the towns of 
Cohasset, Hingham, Hull, Norwell, and Scituate. The South Shore Elder Services 
3-B grants funded this program since 1992. It is a godsend to have transportation 
to Boston and other area that this agency does not cover. Some days we have 
calls to Marshfield, Brockton, Duxbury and it is a great help to have extra services. 

Transportation again consumed a great deal of CEA time, energy and 
resources. In addition to scheduling and providing rides to and from 
nutritional programs, the CEA van transported seniors to local medical 
appointments, food shopping, hairdressing appointments, library visits, 
Massasoit College Music Programs, River Bay in Quincy, and trips around 
town and out of town to the Christmas Tree Shop, malls and out to lunches. 
We were all happy to have the new Ford van, but it does need some 
handicapped adjustments. We want to give special thanks to Ham 
Tewksbury and Jim Donohue for the wonderful job they both do for the 
elders at CEA. As CEA drivers, they have received special training to operate 



145 



the Dodge handicap lift that accommodates wheelchairs. This type of 
transport takes a lot of time, energy and patience. From year to year, the 
clients change, and the drivers must recreate new friendships with each new 
passenger. The medical transportation with Ham & Jim provided 866 rides to 
73 unduplicated seniors over the past twelve months. Last year we provided 
2,564 rides to 74 people and of that, 74 % were women and 26 % men. Most 
of the rides were to areas around Cohasset. People do not have any other 
resources! 

Volunteer transportation is still the paramount issue for elders. Our volunteers are 
very dedicated in providing effective and efficient transportation five days a week. 
Fifty different drivers offer their services one day a month for a three-to-five hour 
span. In reviewing the past year, we realized a 25% turnover of individual drivers. 
We are, therefore, all aware of the constant need to recruit, train and place each 
and everyone who drives. In the future, we will need to advocate and develop a 
transportation strategy for all the South Shore towns that are transportation 
isolated. The goal will be to create a range of traditional and nontraditional options 
to meet the growing transit requirements. We believe we need to have two 
representatives to speak on behalf of the elders on the South Shore. There is 
much need for a technical working group to provide oversight, study and make a 
major policy determination and strategy approval mechanism for solutions and 
development within the study. The primary focus should be to acquire input 
through public forums, interviews and information gatherings. It should potentially 
pave the way for a regional transit authority, thereby improving the overall 
transportation system. 

The town van provided 105 different people rides in-town to places like shopping, 
luncheons, banks, and hair appointments and we know of two people who gave up 
their cars only because the van would be available to them on a daily basis. It is 
hard to realize the impact of not having a car in a town that is so isolated. 

Outreach: The Outreach Program at the Cohasset Elder Affairs staff includes a 
full-time outreach worker who does an outstanding job providing the elders of 
Cohasset with a friendly face to listen to their concerns and offer assistance. Carol 
Barrett spends many hours meeting with elders and their families to ensure that 
the best possible services are being provided. Once again in the past year, we 
saw a tremendous increase in the number of crisis cases that ran the gamut of 
alcohol abuse to financial exploitation. We are fortunate to have the cooperation of 
the Board of Health, Police, and Fire Dept. to assist as needed. Our Outreach 
Coordinator, Carol Barrett, brings a wealth of knowledge from her days in nursing. 
Carol extends herself to help families and elders understand the complexities of 
the medical systems. She also oversees Job Registry for seniors. Fuel 
Assistance, Pre-retirements programs, medical ride evaluations, and bringing new 
people for the luncheons. 



146 



SHINE (Serving Health Information Needs of Elders): With such turbulence in 
the health care systems, we rely on Carol to keep us updated and respond to the 
many questions elders are struggling with today. 

Housing: In June Cohasset Elder Affairs and Hingham Elder Services co- 
sponsored a new program called "Housing Options," run in the Hingham Town Hall 
from 9:30 am to 3:00 pm. This was our first attempt at accessing the housing need 
of elders in the community. It was very successful, with over 125 people attending 
both morning and afternoon sessions. Allerton House, Hingham, provided the 
luncheon. Most of the surveys stated that they enjoyed the day and would want 
to see more programs planned in the future. On May 6, 2005, we will host the 
second session on housing. 

Tax Preparation: In cooperation with the American Association of Retired Persons 
(AARP) and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), federal and state income tax 
preparation assistance is provided by appointment with Roger Sullivan from 
Hingham. Roger has been volunteering his time for the past eleven years. 

Recreation: There are many different kinds of recreational activities at the Senior 
Center. Bowling, drop-in bridge, men's breakfast club (Chanticleers), water 
aerobics, chair yoga, exercises, ACBL Bridge, Book Club, gourmet cooking, 
computer training, knitting, intergenerational projects with 3''^ graders, the Read-A- 
Loud day held in the spring, and a few new programs on the list to start in October. 
Wednesday's day trip to the Malls and lunch at the Vo-Tech still has a great 
following. 

Volunteer Opportunities: The CEA relies greatly on the wonderful volunteers who 
assist us in the many services we provide. As we take residency in the South 
Shore Community Center, we have had the pleasure of having new people of all 
ages join in the network of volunteers in order to make our work complete and less 
stressful on the staff. We anticipate the need for more and more volunteers of all 
ages. The in-kind value of the volunteers working at CEA is $10,296.00, set by the 
Executive Office of Elder Affairs. So you can see that volunteers make the 
difference in extending our local appropriations. 

Transportation: The Cohasset Elder Affairs provides rides at no cost between 
home, banks, hair appointments, local doctors' offices, shopping, and the Senior 
Center. The RIDE services disabled residents who have a permanent disability, 
offering services to destinations within the South Shore Area. Most out-of-town 
medical rides are backing " FISH" or South Shore Elder Service MAP-5 program. 

Information and Referrals: Information of special interest to elders is available at 
the Senior Center. There are lectures, fliers, and pamphlets that address topics 
related to legal matters, consumer issues, health medical information, etc. 
Community professionals from health care agencies provide many of these 
programs and informational material. Our trained staff and volunteers answer an 



147 



average of fifty phone calls per day. It is hard to imagine the number of requests 
that come to the CEA. The calls ask for information on a wide variety of elder 
issues. The staff provides information on transportation services, homemaker 
services, housing, medical insurance, including Medicare and Medicaid, financial 
assistance programs, how to make the most of retirement, volunteer opportunities, 
outreach, and many other aging-related subjects. Carol does referrals to other 
agencies that service elders in Cohasset. A growing number of calls from "non- 
elders" were noted for this past fiscal year. Increasingly more adult children are 
concerned about aging parents, and calls are even received from out of state. 
Calls are always returned in a prompt and caring manner. Many callers have 
commented on the pleasant manner in which the phones are answered and the 
great response to each caller. The outreach worker also has assisted the Cohasset 
Police Department with any emergencies that arise regarding elders. Carol Barrett 
has a telephone reassurance program along with the TRIAD (Are You OK?) 
program. These programs bring a service of safety and contact with the outside 
world. The "Are You OK?" is a computerized system but is managed by a staff 
person who will contact the family if the elder does not answer the phone. Many 
people attended the Safety Fair on Wednesday, October 13, from 10:00 to 12:00. 
Lunch was served at 23 No. Main St., thanks to Sunrise of Cohasset. 



It would be impossible to manage this office of CEA without Carol Barrett, Martha 
Horsefield, Mary Lu Kjer, Mary McElroy, Addle McGrath, Betty Edminster, Jimmy 
Donohue, and Ham Tewksbury, along with many, many volunteers. They step 
forward to head programs such as the Caring for Elders at Home series last fall, 
The Cooking Gourmet Club offered by Anna Abbruzzese, the Book Club with 
Addle McGrath, Chair Yoga with Stephanie Whiting, the Walking Club with Steve 
Bobo and Joe McElroy, the Men's Breakfast Club with Win Merrell, and the Knitting 
group with Edna Finnegan. We must not forget the great helpers in the kitchen 
three days a week, the office helpers, and the high school students who assist 
during the school year. 

Our Board of Directors illustrated dedication to Cohasset's elders through their own 
volunteer hours not only at the Center but throughout the year, with advocacy, 
letter writing, and action calls to the governor and legislature, bringing their 
attention to senior needs. Cohasset has a growing elder population, and there has 
been a cutback in state funding. Special thanks to Susan Gallagher and the board 
members who worked so hard to bring in $5,000 to help with local elder services to 
help pay for local services. 

As we close 2004, we faced the demise of the many funding sources due to the 
elimination of state grants. Other state and federal grants will be lost due to the 
poor economy and the less than optimistic outlook for the immediate future. Our 
own town budget has been level funded. We owe so much to Michael Buckley, 
Director of Finance, and Ronnie McMorris, Board of Selectmen, for advocating our 



148 



needs as an agency for elder care. At the same time we look forward to another 
10% increase in our elderly population, which is currently 23%. 

This year's report concludes by expressing our appreciation to numerous local 
businesses, and all the churches for their support. We are grateful to the South 
Shore Community Center for our home. The CEA also applauds the efforts of the 
Highway Department for coming to our rescue so many times. We enjoy working 
with all town departments, thanking them for all their time, effort, and collaboration. 
We appreciate the Board of Selectmen for their leadership, along with the Police 
and Fire Departments for their organization and cooperation with the TRAID 
Program. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kathleen R. Bryanton 



149 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE COHASSET HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The Cohasset Housing authority is a public agency with a five member Board 
of Commissioners, four of whom stand for town election and the Governor 
appoints the remaining Commissioner. 

Commissioner Term Expires 

John D. Muncey, Chairman 2006 

Christopher Allen, Vice Chaimian 2005 

Anne C. Barrett, Treasurer 2008 

Ralph Perroncello, Asst. Treasurer 2007 

Helen C. Nothnagle (appointed December 13, 2002;The Governor's Appointee 

remains in the position until such time as a new Commissioner is appointed. 



The Cohasset Housing Authority has a staff of two: 

Marilyn A. LeBlanc, Executive Director 
Jill A. Rosano, Maintenance Supervisor 

According to their bylaws, the Board of Commissioners meets on the fourth 
Tuesday of each month and holds its annual meeting in June. 

Cohasset's subsidized housing inventory includes 64 state units of Chapter 667 
Elderly/Disabled housing located at 60 Elm Street and 12 units of Chapter 689 
Special Needs housing located at 72, 74, and 76 Elm Street. The Department of 
Housing and Community Development subsidizes these 76 state units. The 31 
federally subsidized Section 8 program provides rental assistance for families and 
is funded by the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Our annual 
subsidies are granted upon successful annual, semi-annual, and quarterly reviews 
of management and regulatory compliance. 

Eligibility standards for Harborview include a maximum allowable income of 
$40,600, and the age for admission is 60. With the loss of many residents, at 
present our Wait List stands at 32, many of whom are Cohasset residents. Local 
residents under state law have a preference on our Wait List. "Local Preference" 
as defined by state law is "any applicant living and/or working in the Town." The 
Board of Commissioners recommends that application for subsidized housing at 
Harborview be made before the need becomes critical. There is approximately a 
one-year wait for an apartment for a local resident and longer for a non-resident. 

Modemization grants for capital improvements are awarded by our funding source, 
the Department of Housing & Community Development. Grants that have been 



150 



approved are waiting for funding to begin. A bond issue is expected to be 
introduced by the Department to fund projects in the pipeline. Funding has been 
an issue, specifically the recapture of all capital reserves by the State. The annual 
subsidy for 2004 has not been forthcoming, and our professional representation, 
the Massachusetts chapter of the National Association of Housing and 
Redevelopment Officials, has recommended that we alert our municipalities to the 
budget crisis. 

In unprecedented consideration, the Community Preservation Committee 
entertained requests from the Cohasset Housing Authority in the form of needed 
capital improvements. Selecting from a list of needs, the CPC chose to fund an 
intercom/secure door system for Harborview, given that the entry doors to each 
building were not capable of being locked. Now the doors are secure and 
residents will be able to identify callers and make the decision whether or not to 
allow entry. The Committee also chose to replace all of the 30-year-old 
refrigerators and stoves that were original with the complex. Lastly, it chose to 
install lever door handles for all units, which will assist those with mobility issues 
resulting from arthritis and stroke as well as aging. Fortunately, the Cohasset 
Housing Authority was able to return this fall with a request to the CPC for water- 
saver commodes, water-saver showerheads, and a number of water heaters. Our 
deepest gratitude to Taffy Nothnagle initiating the process and presenting the 
application; to the CPC for their thoughtful and generous consideration of our 
needs; to the Selectmen and the Advisory Committee for their encouraging support 
in placing this issue on the Town Meeting warrant; and to the citizens attending 
Town Meeting. Their support in approving the requests honors our senior citizens 
and enhances their quality of life here at Harborview. 

The State's proposed budget reduces Housing Authority operating dollars for the 
fourth year in a row. We continue to request emergency funding for our complex, 
as weather and time take their toll. We will be submitting a budget that will be 
approved by the Department of Housing and Community Development but also 
indicates our actual needs. 

We continue to submit Condition Assessment Reports (our primary vehicle for 
grants awarded for Capital Improvements) requesting roof and gutter repair, siding 
for the building envelope and site, and lighting up-grades to improve security. 

2004 proved to be a year of social occasions with birthday parties, holiday potluck 
dinners, cookouts, and card games. 

Our continued gratitude to the Department of Public Works for their continued 
generosity, insuring the safety of our residents; to those anonymous citizens who 
drop things off to benefit the seniors; and to Giri Scout Troop 4781 for always 
remembering us. We thank you. 



151 



The Board of Commissioners continues to pursue its mandate of providing 
affordable, safe, and secure housing and of reviewing and updating regulatory 
policies/procedures. It remains diligent in the research of opportunities to create 
affordable housing for those with the greatest need. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John D. Muncey, Chairman 

Christopher Allen, Vice-Chairman 

Ann C. Barrett, Treasurer 

Ralph Perroncello, Assistant Treasurer 

Helen C. Nothnagle, Governor's Appointee 



152 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BUILDING INSPECTOR 

During the past year, the Building Department issued pemiits for over $24 million 
of new construction. The total includes nine new dwellings and six reconstructions 
where existing homes were razed and replaced, along with hundreds of 
remodeling projects and substantial renovations. 

In addition to permitting and inspecting these projects, the Building Commissioner 
inspects and certifies the safety of all public buildings and places of assembly, and 
seals all measuring devices as the Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

Building Department Activity for 2004 



Estimated-Cost of Construction permits 
Building Permit Fees Collected 

Certificate of Inspections 
Zoning bylaws and Maps 
Copy Machine (.20 per page) 

Occupancy Permits 
Topographical Maps 

Plumbing Permits 
Gas Permits 

Weights & Measures 23 1 ,365.00 



As always, I would like to thank all of the departments, boards, and commissions 
for their continued assistance and support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert M. Egan 

Building Commissioner 

Zoning Officer 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 



407 


24,227,547 




157,243.00 


12 


795.00 


48 


446.50 




57.00 


17 


425.00 




35.00 


215 


9,515.00 


158 


4.822.00 



153 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PLANNING BOARD 

The Cohasset Planning Board, under the authority granted by iVlassachusetts 
General Law, Chapter 41, Section 81A-GG (Planning and Subdivision Control 
Law), and Chapter 40A (the Zoning Act), is charged with the review of subdivisions 
and site plan review of various development projects. In addition to these duties, 
the Board completed a number of additional planning tasks in 2004. 

In April the Board bid farewell to Bill Good and Chris Ford, as each reluctantly 
retired his Board duties to attend to personal and professional matters. Mike 
Westcott was elected to the five-year term vacated by Good. Stuart Ivimey was 
elected to fill the one-year post created by Ford's resignation. 

The Board conducted hearings on a number of Zoning Bylaw amendments. These 
amendments including revisions to the lot coverage reduction, elimination of an 
outdated appeal process for site plan review, reduction in the number of units 
eligible to be built under the Senior Multi-family Overlay development special 
permit, creation of land clearing and alteration regulations, clarification of the 
political sign bylaw, changes regarding non-conforming lots and structures, and a 
large-home site plan review. Of the proposed amendments, large-home site plan 
review, political signs, and a reduction of units under the Senior Multi-family 
Overlay development process were voted favorably by Town Meeting and became 
part of the Zoning Bylaw. 

The Town's first applicant under the Senior Multi-family Overlay District, King 
Taylor LLC and its project "Cedarmere," received a special permit in January 2004 
to build a 104- unit senior development including 27 units of affordable housing. In 
late December, the project received a groundwater discharge permit for an on-site 
wastewater system. An abutter appeal of the special permit was still working its 
way through the court system as the New Year began. A second Senior Multi- 
family Overlay project. Great Neck Residences, was filed in January. This 40-unit 
project, located adjacent to Beach Street and behind Town Hall, was denied 
special permit approval based on insufficient engineering and architectural 
information. 

The Board began the review of its first definitive subdivision since 2000, when 
Anthony Nader filed the 14-lot "Highland Estates" project in early September. The 
project is located along Beechwood Street in the vicinity of Mealy's Pond. and is 
bordered by the Greenbush train tracks. Abutter concems included drainage and 
flooding issues. The Board was looking at conditions of approval including 
permanent drainage and grading easements to govern future construction that 
might alter approved drainage patterns. A planned sidewalk along Beechwood 
Street was to be linked to the proposed sidewalks within the subdivision. 



154 



Development of a Town Geographic Information System (GIS) continued at a 
steady pace as the Board worked actively with the Water Department and 
Assessor's Office to ensure that GIS data was kept up to date and that the efforts 
of various departments were integrated. 

The Board began its review of the Master Plan as drafted by the Growth and 
Development Committee. Once the Board finalizes its review, a public hearing will 
be advertised to provide citizens an opportunity to comment on a final version of 
the document. Some of the proposals contained in the draft Master Plan, such as 
creation of a large-home site review and adoption of an affordable housing plan, 
were actively in place or under consideration. 

The Board adopted regulations for the administration of the new large-home site 
review bylaw and received four applications for this new review. Each of the 
hearings went quite smoothly, with some residents attending and expressing their 
concerns about the proposed projects. The Board was able to hear this input and 
incorporate this into their written recommendation to the Building Inspector. 

In an unusually busy year, the Board reviewed and approved with conditions four 
site plan review applications that included an office building for the Graham Waste 
operation, a new building for King Jewelers, a large addition to the DiNero's 
restaurant, and a drive-through Dunkin Donuts and family-style restaurant at the 
current location of the KoKo Island restaurant. A site plan review application for 
alternations at the Mill River Boatyard was denied based on lack of specificity in 
the proposed uses of the renovated buildings. 

In addition, the Board conducted the following regular business: 

Held 24 meetings and Reviewed 16 subdivision approval-not-required applications 
or "Form A's," approving 14 and denying 2 of these applications based on lack of 
adequate access. 



155 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

The Cohasset Conservation Commission's bi-monthly meetings were generally 
scheduled to capacity to review a record number of applications, including 67 
Notices of Intent (NOI) and 24 Requests for Determination of Applicability (RDA). 
In comparison, during the preceding year 26 NOI's and 18 RDA's were filed. The 
most notable project during 2004 was Cedarmere, the senior housing project off 
Beechwood Street. The Cohasset Conservation Commission also conducted a 
large number of site visits, including several to Cedarmere and to other projects 
throughout Cohasset. 

In addition to our regular proceedings, several members attended several 
meetings regarding the management of Sandy Beach, including a meeting at the 
DEP offices in Boston. We also had a number of hearings with the Water 
Commission in relation to many Water Department initiatives. 

Although we anticipated we would have many hearings on the Greenbush line, 
they have yet to materialize. We anticipate we will be very busy with Greenbush 
environmental reviews in the upcoming year. 

We also experienced several changes in membership. Anne Brophy and Jeff Waal 
resigned, and Sarah Charron and David Farrag were appointed in March. Alix 
White was appointed in October to fill a vacancy. In addition, the Conservation 
Commission is pleased to welcome two associate members, Richard Karoff and 
Ross Smith. 

We would also like to thank our agent Paul Shea for all his guidance during this 
busy year. We feel very privileged to have his knowledge and support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Deborah S. Cook, Chairman 

Virginia A. Brophy (resigned July, 2004)) 

Sarah E. Charron (appointed March 16, 2004) 

James G. Dedes 

David H. Farrag (appointed March 16, 2004) 

Edward S. Graham, Jr. 

Veneta P. Roebuck 

Alix P. White (appointed October 19, 2004) 

Jeffrey C. Waal (term expired June, 2004) 

Richard M. Karoff (Associate - appointed October 1 9, 2004) 

Ross R. Smith (Associate - appointed October 19, 2004) 



156 



OPEN SPACE COMMITTEE ANNUAL REPORT 

The Open Space Committee worked on a number of initiatives this year. We 
created a brochure regarding environmentally-sensitive ways to care for lawns, 
which was sent to every home via a water bill. The brochure was researched, 
written, and designed by Open Space members as part of the Open Space 
Committee's "Cohasset Go Green" project /an ongoing environmental educational 
effort. 

In addition, several committee members were very involved in helping facilitate a 
major land acquisition off King Street by the Water Department . Presentations 
were made to the Selectmen, Community Preservation Committee, and Town 
Meeting. This property, which comprises a number of parcels, was listed in the 
Open Space Plan as an important acquisition. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Deborah S. Cool<, Chairman 
Sandra Durant 
Mary Lou Lawrence 
Mary Michel 
Keith Moskow 



157 



SOUTH SHORE RECYCLING COOPERATIVE 

December 31 , 2004 

Cohasset is a member of the South Shore Recycling Cooperative, a 
voluntary association of 15 South Shore towns established by Intermunicipal 
Agreement (IMA) and Special Legislation. Member towns of the SSRC include 
Abington, Cohasset, Duxbury, Hanover, Hingham, Holbrook, Hull, Kingston, 
Marshfield, Norwell, Plymouth, Rockland, Scituate, Weymouth, and Whitman. 

Each member town is represented by two residents appointed by the 
Selectmen. Cohasset is represented by Merle Brown, who is the Chairman of the 
SSRC, and John McNabb, who is Secretary of the SSRC. 

According to the IMA, the mission of the SSRC is: "... to provide a forum of 
cooperative management of solid waste by members, to assist each member Town 
to improve the cost-effectiveness of their recycling efforts by providing economy of 
scale while maintaining full control over solid waste management; to assist 
members to improve programs to divert waste materials from the waste stream 
and to reduce the amount and toxicity of wastes; and to provide such assistance 
on an individual basis to each member Town and cooperatively in joint programs 
with other Towns." 

Each member town pays an annual membership fee of $4,000, which in 
2004 raised a total of $60,000, which the SSRC supplemented with various state 
grants. The SSRC uses those funds to fund an Executive Director and various 
solid waste and recycling activities during the year to benefit member towns. The 
SSRC estimated that in 2004 that SSRC activities saved member towns a total of 
$214,324, a more than three-fold retum on the investment. 

The SSRC provides valuable networking opportunities and information 
sharing at their well-attended monthly Solid Waste Manager meetings, at which 
solid waste collection, disposal and recycling service, pricing and proposed laws 
and regulations are discussed among member towns. The meetings often feature 
speakers on subjects of interest to the local MSW community, including special 
waste disposal, regulatory compliance, legislative and budget issues, grant 
assistance, and regional recycling collections. 

HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE. By using the regional contract 
negotiated by the SSRC with Clean Harbors for the collection and disposal of 
household hazardous products, member towns saved about 25% plus the $700 
setup fee required in the State contract, and avoided the administrative time to bid 
it out. At the SSRC's ten collection events in 2004 for HHW, which were attended 
by 1 ,725 residents of SSRC member towns, total savings were approximately 
$26,000 for this service. The contract also enabled 136 residents and businesses 
to attend other SSRC town collections in the region that year using the reciprocal 
arrangement. In addition to publicizing the events with several thousand flyers 
delivered to town halls and libraries, the SSRC also provided ongoing press 
releases in all local papers and on cable TV and the radio. The SSRC helped run 



158 



nine of the collections, handed out paint stirrers with cost-saving instructions on 
latex paint disposal, provided signs, and calculated the proper billing for the vendor 
to ensure that discounts and allowances were credited and visitors billed properly. 

CONSTRUCTION & BULKY WASTE. By using the arrangement negotiated 
by the SSRC with the Bourne Integrated Solid Waste Management Facility, SSRC 
member towns enjoyed a disposal rate of $70/ton for construction and bulky waste, 
which is $10 lower than the usual gate fee of $80/ton. With a total generation of 
8,599 tons, Member Towns saved $54,782 in 2004 with this arrangement. The 
SSRC also released an RFP for future services for SSRC towns for collection of 
construction & bulky waste, as the Bourne Facility may no longer be able to accept 
C&D at some unknown time in the near future. Four companies responded to an 
RFP for the processing and disposal of construction, demolition and bulky waste. 
A contract was awarded to Waste Management, but has not been signed yet. 

MATTRESSES. The SSRC conducted an RFQ for mattress disposal when 
the surcharge at Bourne increased from $10 to $15 each, plus the tip fee and 
transportation, coupled with the elimination of the 10 mattress/load allowance. 
Three companies responded, and an agreement was reached with Miller Recycling 
in Plainville for $14/each, including container and transportation. This arrangement 
saved the three participating towns approximately $3,000 in the 3-4 months the 
agreement has been in place, with the potential of $20,000/year savings if all eight 
eligible towns use the agreement. 

WASTE OIL. The SSRC got a 100/gal rebate from Cyn Environmental for 
waste oil. Towns had previously received nothing from either Clean Harbors or 
Cyn. This should generate $1 ,000 for Member Towns for the six months it was in 
effect in 2004. 

RADIO ADS. The SSRC produced five one-minute radio ads promoting 
recycling and waste reduction in the South Shore, and obtained sponsorship from 
American Ref Fuel at SEMASS to cover half of the airtime cost, to broadcast 68 
minutes of ads on WATD 95.9 fm (Marshfield) and WJDA 1300 am (Quincy) in 
November. Holbrook Selectman and SSRC Board Member Jeff Lowe, a radio 
professional, co-wrote and recorded the ads. Total cost was $1,200. 

MERCURY THERMOMETER SWAPS. The SSRC assisted the thirteen 
member towns, including Cohasset, that have long-term contracts with SEMASS to 
maximize their benefits from the SEMASS Material Separation Plan (MSP), 
including the provision by SEMASS to provide about 500 digital thermometers for 
Dunkin Donuts coupons as incentive for residents and contractors to turn in 
mercury thermostats, and reimbursement for mercury disposal costs, valued at 
$10,640. These programs removed over 1 1 lbs. of mercury total from the waste 
stream during 2004. 



159 



BRUSH GRINDING. The SSRC extended its contracts for brush grinding 
and trommel screening for the processing of compost, which were used by several 
SSRC towns in 2004. 

With help from Norwell volunteer John Garvey, the SSRC went online with its new 
website, ssrc.info . The site includes town-specific recycling information, household 
hazardous product collection dates and instructions, press releases, Business 
Partnership information, links to other sites, annual reports, and the quarterly 
newsletter. 

EVENT RECYCLING. Through a grant from the Mass. DEP, the SSRC 
worked with event organizers to establish event recycling programs at the South 
Shore Arts Festival, the Hull Climate InfoFest, and the Marshfield Fair. While 
public education was the main benefit, five tons of material were also diverted from 
the trash for recycling. Recycling containers were included in the grant and are 
available for loan to all South Shore events. 

LEGISLATIVE BREAKFAST. The SSRC held a Legislative Breakfast in 
May at which Rep. Mark Carron (D-Southbridge) was recognized with our 
"Environmental Hero" award for his sponsorship and support of a bill to require 
computer manufacturers to be financially responsible for the environmentally 
responsible collection and recycling of used computers and computer monitors. 

ADVOCACY. The SSRC orchestrated municipal advocacy for State budget 
items that benefit municipal solid waste programs. The SSRC Executive Director 
attended policy meetings, forums, and conferences hosted by the DEP, Solid 
Waste Association of North America, the Council of SEMASS Communities, the 
Mass. Recycling Coalition, and the Northeast Resource Recovery Association, and 
attends most Mass. DEP Solid Waste Advisory Committee meetings. 

The Executive Director's advice and assistance are frequently sought by the 
solid waste managers, both on site and over the phone, on such issues as 
curbside contracting, disposal of special wastes, alternative vendors for different 
materials, regulations, and accessing grants. She met with the solid waste 
managers from each town to discuss how to maximize their SSRC benefits, 
improve their bottom lines, and any other specific needs each town had. She 
spent extra time consulting with and making presentations to Hull officials and 
residents about implementing a new curbside collection program, spoke to the 
Holbrook Selectmen about implementing PAYT, met with Whitman officials to 
discuss a proposed PAYT program, gave guidance to the Norwell Board of Health 
on abandoned waste management, and assisted Marshfield in preparing to hire a 
Recycling Coordinator. 

The SSRC publishes a quarteriy newsletter filled with information of 
immediate interest to the South Shore solid waste community, including local solid 
waste news, regulatory and legislative proposals, meetings, and seminars. The 
newsletter is circulated to over 300 town officials, legislators, regulators, and 
volunteers. 



160 



The Executive Director did public outreach by writing articles for, and being 
the subject of interviews with the local press, which promote waste reduction and 
recycling and the proper disposal of mercury-bearing waste. She also fielded 94 
calls from Member Towns' residents in CY04 to answer questions, related mostly 
to HHP and CRT disposal. 

Cohasset's representatives to the SSRC feel that the Town of Cohasset 
receives valuable service from the Town's membership in the SSRC and that our 
continued participation will not only continue to save money for the Town of 
Cohasset but will help Cohasset and the other member towns to better protect the 
environment by helping us to recycle more solid waste. 

COHASSET REPRESENTATIVES 

Merle Brown, SSRC Chairman 

John McNabb, SSRC Secretary 



161 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT 

I hereby submit the Annual Report for the Cohasset Fire Department for the 

year ending December 31, 2004. 

A statistical analysis of the Department responses for the year is as follows: 

Building / Structure Fires 52 

Brush /Outdoor Fires 25 

Motor Vehicle Crashes 136 

Motor Vehicle Fires 3 

Medical Emergencies 831 

Investigations 94 

Inspections 413 

Assistance 104 

Miscellaneous 340 

Total 1,998 

Medical Responses: 

Total Incidents 967 

Basic Life Support Transports 168 

Advanced Life Support Transports 396 

Mutual Aid Rendered 224 

Mutual Aid Received 85 

Mutual Aid with other Towns, for fires: 

Rendered 45 

Received 22 



162 



APPARATUS 

The Fire Department is currently operating with the following apparatus: 

Engine 1 - 1994 Pierce- 1,750 G.P.IVl. Pumping Engine 

Engine 2-1987 Pierce - 1,250 G.P.M. Pumping Engine 

Engine 3 - 2001 HME/ Central States - 1 ,250 G.P.M. Pumping Engine 

Ladder 1 - 2004 Pierce - 105 Foot Aerial Ladder Truck 

Squad 1 - 2000 Ford - 4 wheel drive - 500 G.P.M. pump 

Rescue 3 - 2001 Ford -E-450 - Ambulances 

Car 20 - 1995 Ford - 4 wheel drive - Chiefs Vehicle 

Rescue Craft - 1993 Avon - 14ft. Inflatable/trailer 



In conclusion, I would like to extend to the Citizens of Cohasset, the Board of Selectmen, 
the Town Manager, and the Heads and Members of all Town Departments and 
Committees my sincere thanks and appreciation for their assistance. 

To the Officers and Firefighters of the Department for their dedication and performance 
of duties, my sincere thanks and appreciation. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Roger W. Lincoln, Chief 



163 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE POLICE DEPARTMENT 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORT 



2004 STATISTICS 



Offense 



Reported 



Robbery 

Assaults 

Breaking and Entering 

Larceny 

Larceny of Motor Vehicle 

Vandalism 

Criminal Complaints Sought 

Motor Vehicle Accidents Investigated 

Motor Vehicle Citations Issued 

Parking Tickets Issued 

Residential & Business Alarms answered 

Stolen Motor Vehicles Recovered 

Official Complaints Received 

Department Vehicle Mileage 

Special Details 

9-1-1 calls Received 

Domestic Violence Cases Investigated 

FID Cards Issued 

LTC Issued/Renewed 




12 

42 

102 

7 

76 

70 

174 

576 

500 

585 

7 

10,584 

130,662 

923 

1,379 

31 

25 

34 



RECORD OF ARRESTS 2004 



Offense 



Male 



Female 



Assault and Battery 


10 


4 


Assault and Battery with a Deadly Weapon 


3 


1 


Breaking and Entering 


11 





Operating Under the Influence of Liquor 


6 


2 


Violation of Drug Laws 


3 


1 


Warrants 


4 


3 


Larceny 


4 


2 


Larceny of Motor Vehicle 


4 





Shoplifting 


3 


2 


Minor in Possession of Alcohol 


5 





Motor Vehicle Violations 


14 


3 


Protective Custody 


16 


6 


Malicious Destruction of Property 


10 





Violation of Protective Order 


1 


3 


Leaving Scene after Personal Injury 


1 






164 



Annoying Telephone Calls 


1 





Fail to Disperse 


2 





Criminal Harassment 


1 





Sell/Deliver Liquor to Person Under 21 





1 


Use of a Boat without Authority 


3 


1 


Disorderly Conduct 





1 


Threat to Commit a Crime 


1 






103 30 



TOTAL ARRESTS 133 



FEES RETURNED TO GENERAL FUND 

Court Fines & assessments 16,227.00 

Parking Violations 12,310.00 
Paid Detail Surcharge 

8,873.36 

License Fees 5,553.00 

Request for Police Reports 658.00 

False Alarms/Billing 1 ,800.00 



James M. Hussey, Chief of Police 



165 



REPORT OF THE EMERGENCY DISPACH CENTER 



To the citizens of the Town of Cohasset I hereby submit the Annual Report of 
the Cohasset Emergency Dispatch Center for the year ending January 31, 
2004. This year again was a very busy year for all Dispatch Personnel. 

This department received 1 ,370 91 1 calls and logged 10,602 calls for service. This 
department continues to work with the Town Assessors updating the Towns E-91 1 
Database and making sure all homes are numbered properly. 

All residents and business owners are reminded that if you have a burglar alarm or 
Fire alarm please keep contact information updated with the Dispatch Center. All 
information will be entered into the Departments Database. You can call 1-781- 
383-1055 Ex 1003 for more information. 

I would like to thank the men and women of the Emergency Dispatch Center who 
work in a very stressful job answering the emergency needs of the Town Of 
Cohasset, Dispatcher Patricia Douglas, Christopher Grant, Patricia Lowery, John 
Hussey, Corey Brooks, and Sasha Geddes for their dedication and service to the 
Town of Cohasset. 

I would also like to thank the Honorable Board of Selectmen, Chief of Police James 
M, Hussey, and Fire Chief Roger W, Lincoln for their continued support of the 
Cohasset Emergency Dispatch Center. 



Respectfully Submitted 

i 

Thomas W, Wigmore 
Communications Supervisor 



166 



RREPORT OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PREPAREDNESS COMMITTEE 

THE PROJECT 

The committee began the work of updating the 1999 Town of Cohasset 
Comprehensive Emergency IVIanagement Plan using new guidelines from FEMA, 
and MEMA in August of 2003, working towards a submission deadline of 
December 31 . Subsequently, the State GDP (Office of Domestic Preparedness) 
and the State Department of Public Health issued a request for information due on 
November 15. The information the GDP wanted was to assess the vulnerability of 
the town with regard to training and equipment in the event of a terrorist attack or 
natural disaster. Special emphasis was placed on locations that would involve 
biological, chemical, radiological, nuclear and explosive hazards. The combined 
request for information from the state was several thousand questions. The 
ultimate use of the data collection by the State is to give them a guideline to 
distribute money expected from the Department of Homeland Security during 
2004. 

• The operation of the Primary Emergency Operations Center has been improved 
by the additions and alterations to the Public Safety Building. The new area 
provided for the police has been designed to be converted to the EOC 
(Emergency Operations Center). 

• The secondary EOC has been moved from the Town Hall to the Water 
Treatment Plant. The plant was selected because of its generator, space, 
telecommunications capability and staging area. The Water Commission has 
ordered an upgrade to their communications system so that all public safety 
and EOC communications can be switched to the plant when needed. 
We identified and assessed the 79 critical infrastructures in town. 
The locations of all hazardous materials are listed and shown on the 
emergency response locator program that the dispatch center and the Fire 
commanders have available when they respond to an incident. 
The ICS100 Incident Command System has been adopted as the structure that 
we will operate under during an incident. 

Included in the planning is an emergency response for a breach of the Aaron 
River Dam. The plan deals with the evacuation of the inundated areas in 
Cohasset and Scituate. 

The School Department emergency plan has been incorporated into the EMP. 
Our response to the SOP (State Office of Preparedness) questionnaire showed 
that we need about $250,000 for materials and equipment to be prepared for 
certain emergency responses. 

The Massachusetts Department of Public Health - Bioterrorism Preparedness 
Survey was completed. 
FEMA Disaster Maps have been updated. 

ONGOING OEM 

The Committee plans to continue the work of preparedness for the future through 
various activities. 



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• We plan to be a visible organization within the town Public Safety sector. 

• As available funding from the state becomes more clear, we plan to implement 
a program of employee training for all Departments. 

• We plan to strengthen our mutual cooperative agreements with the surrounding 
towns. 

• We are working with private companies in town to assure smooth emergency 
cooperation, such of the use of nursing homes and access to pharmacy and 
food supplies. 

• We intend to take the lead in a regional field exercise to assess regional 
preparedness. 

• Within our own departments, we plan to begin a series of tabletop exercises to 
evaluate the status of readiness. 

• The committee plans to put together a plan to obtain funding from the Town 
Meeting as our needs are determined after State funding. 

We appreciate the support provided by the Town Manager. It should be noted 
that the Board of Health has taken the lead on many issues of emergency 
preparedness through the aggressive work of Dr. Joe Godzick and Judy 
Fitzsimmons. The Board has recently received a $5,000 State grant for training. 

We used $1 ,800 in funds received from MEMA to cover certain expenses of our 
wori<. 

The Emergency Management Plan is available to the members of the Committee. 
However, it is not a public document and cannot be available for public viewing. 



THE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PREPAREDNESS COMMITTEE 



Roseanne M. McMorris 
Mark W. Haddad 
Robert W. Jackson 
Roger W. Lincoln 
Carl A. Sestito 
Stephen N. Bobo 
Judith E. Fitzsimmons 
Dr. Edward M. Malvey 
J. Michael Buckley 
Arthur L. Lehr, Jr. 
Glenn A. Pratt 



Chairman, Board of Selectmen 

Town Manager 

Chief of Police 

Chief of Fire 

Director, DPW 

Chairman, Board of Health 

Public Health Nurse 

Superintendent, Cohasset Public Schools 

Finance Director 

Director, Office of Emergency Management 

Deputy Director, Office of Emergency 

Management 



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2004 ANNUAL REPORT 
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 



GENERAL: 

The Department of Public Works is a town service organization responsible for 
providing essential services for the citizens of Cohasset. Sen/ices provided by this 
department include construction, maintenance and repair of streets, sidewalks, and 
storm drainage systems; maintenance and repair of vehicles and equipment; 
maintenance of parks, cemeteries, athletic fields, and off-street parking facilities; 
maintenance of all town buildings and schools; the transfer of public refuse and 
recyclables; snow removal and ice control; maintenance and/or removal of town 
owned trees; filling and maintenance of the fuel tanks. 

In addition to providing routine maintenance throughout the year, the following 
projects were completed by or under the direction of the DPW during the last year: 

Rebuilt 6 catch basins and installed 150 feet of drainage pipe. 

Rebuilt or replaced 6 fences. 

Replaced or repaired 41 traffic and street signs. 

Reconstructed the gates at Sandy Beach. 

Resurfaced various private ways. 

In an effort to control algae in Little Harbor, we opened and closed the Cat Dam 
gates each month from April to December. 

Constructed and maintained 2 temporary parking areas in the downtown area as 
part of the Greenbush Project. 

Transfen-ed 1 ,878 tons of solid waste and 828 tons of C&D. Recycled 920 tons of 
mixed paper products, 217 tons of scrap metals and cans, 44 tons of plastics, 132 
tons of glass and 1 ,21 gallons of waste oil. Over 300 ton of leaves and brush 
were processed. We have seen a substantial increase in recycling by our citizens 
due to the continuation of the pay-per-throw program. 

Constructed an additional 6 parking spaces at the Elm Street Senior Housing. 

Replaced the roof on the baling building at the Recycling Transfer Facility. 



169 



Removed various dead or diseased trees and planted new trees and shrubs 
throughout the town. 

Cleaned and maintained all town buildings. Provided maintenance at all schools. 

Conducted and recorded 42 internment's at the various town-owned cemeteries. 

Prepared a $1.75 million Annual Operating Budget and a $175 thousand Capital 
Improvement Program for Fiscal Year 2005. 



The Department of Public Works would like to extend our appreciation to all town 
employees, boards, and committees for their continued assistance and support 
during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Carl A. Sestito 
D.P.W. Superintendent 



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ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 



2004 was one of the most productive and successful years in the 54-year history of 

the Cohasset Water Department. Some of our most significant accomplishments 

were: 

SRF Low Interest Loan Program. At the March 27 Annual Town Meeting we 

received authorization to borrow $21 million from the Drinking Water and Clean 

Water Act State Revolving Fund (SRF) 2% low interest loan programs. On October 

15, we submitted the required engineering plans and permit applications to allow 

us to begin the 6-year system improvement program in 2005. 

Sale of Water to Linden Ponds. In 2004, the Water Commission acquired the 

Interbasin Transfer Determination of Insignificance permit needed to sell water to 

the Linden Ponds development in Hingham and made further progress toward 

making the water main connection to Hingham. 

Land Acquisition to Protect Water Supply. In 2004, we acquired over 50 acres 

of land in the watershed of Lily Pond and the Aaron River Reservoir to prevent 

future development that may threaten drinking water quality. 

Stormwater BMP Implementation Project. In 2004, we completed the planning 

for the landscape and stormwater improvements for the Lily Pond and Aaron River 

Watersheds that over the next 3 years should reduce nutrient loading by 50% to 

these water supplies. 

Taste & Odor Study. In 2004, we completed our first investigation of the taste & 

odor problems with tap water. The study showed that our drinking water has 

multiple overlapping taste and odor issues, which require a comprehensive 

solution, which we are working on. 

Water Quality Improvements. To improve drinking water quality, including 

reducing Disinfection Byproducts and improving taste & odor, we made many 

improvements, including adding potassium permanganate, enhanced coagulation, 

and polyaluminum chloride to the water treatment process. 

Distribution System Improvements. In 2004, we replaced 7,500 feet (1.42 miles) 

of undersized water mains on North Main Street, Redgate Lane, Jerusalem Road 

Drive, and Haystack Lane, and on December 24 looped the water mains on 

Newtonville and Elm Court. 

WATER COMMISSIONERS. At the April 2, 2004 Town Election, new Water 
Commissioner Nathaniel Palmer was elected, replacing Commissioner Robert 
Kasameyer, who retired from the Board after ten years of service. At the Board's 
reorganization meeting in April, Commissioner John McNabb was re-elected as 
Chairman, Commissioner Glenn Pratt was elected Vice-Chairman, and 
Commissioner Palmer was elected Clerk. 

NEW STAFF. In 2004 we welcomed two new employees in Cohasset of American 
Water, our contractor responsible for the operation and maintenance of the Water 
Department: Jared Hill, Environmental Engineer, who formeriy worked for a major 
water treatment products company and is a graduate of Worcester Polytechnic 



171 



Institute, and Drew Cottone, Plant Operator, who joins us with 25 years experience 
as operations and maintenance supervisor at a 120 million gallon per day water 
treatment plant. They join our current staff: Superintendent Hugh SpunA/ay, 
Distribution Supervisor Bill McAuliffe, Disthbution Foreman Barry Sladen, Office 
Manager Brenda Douglas, and Plant Operators Rick Mosca and Ted Lavin. 

THE COHASSET WATER DEPARTMENT provides water for domestic 
consumption and fire protection to about 90% of the Town of Cohasset. Our 
service area does not include the North Cohasset area, which is serviced by the 
Aquarion Water Company of Massachusetts (formerly known as the Hingham 
Mass-American Water Company). The Cohasset Water Department system 
encompasses about 36 miles of water mains, 2,422 service connections, and 364 
fire hydrants. During 2004, a total of 293,850,015 gallons of water were produced 
and pumped to the distribution system. American Water Services, Inc. continues 
as the contractor responsible for the operation and maintenance of the Water 
Department under the direction and control of the elected Board of Water 
Commissioners. 

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT. Our fiscal situation continues to be excellent. 
Through skillful management of existing financial resources, we have been able to 
continue our aggressive system-wide capital improvements program without 
raising the water rates since they were last increased in 1997. Since 1997, we 
have borrowed and expended over $16,000,000 in capital improvements projects - 
which is over 7 times the $2,130,000 spending that the 1997 rate increase was 
planned to fund. We have been able to stretch these funds through measures such 
as the careful management of our debt structure, prudent expenditure of our 
occasional surpluses, and additional income from the System Development 
Charge, which was established in 2002. The Water Department is entirely self- 
supporting (as an Enterprise Fund) from user fees and other fees and charges 
(which does not impact non-customers living in North Cohasset who are served by 
the Aquarion Water Company in Hingham), including the fire hydrant rental fee 
from the Town. We do not receive any property tax revenue from the Town of 
Cohasset. We will soon be receiving additional revenue from the sale of water to 
the Linden Ponds development in Hingham, which should commence in 
September 2005. 

AMERICAN WATER SERVICES CONTRACT RENEWED. On September 30, the 
Board of Water Commissioners and the Town renewed the contract with American 
Water Services for the operation and maintenance of the water system. American 
Water Services has had this contract since 1998 for its first three-year term, which 
was renewed in 2001 and then in 2004 for the final three-year tenn for this 
contractor allowed under state law until June 30, 2007. The Commission has been 
very satisfied with the service provided by American Water, and their costs are 
competitive. The Commission had Norfolk Ram investigate the relative costs and 
benefits of contract operations for some municipal water operations in New 
England and other parts of the country to evaluate the competitiveness of the 



172 



current contract between American Water and the Town of Cohasset. Cohasset's 
operating cost was found to be quite comparable to those smaller communities 
most similar to Cohasset in type and size of system and volume of water sold; for 
the comparable Massachusetts towns of Southbridge, Winchendon, and Sturbridge 
(groundwater source); and for the other towns of Plattsburg, MO and Ramseur, 
NC, all of which are operated under contract with private firms; and data for towns 
of Ellsworth, ME and Montpelier, VT which are municipal (non-contract) operations 
but similar to Cohasset in size and type (surface water source). Norfolk Ram 
Group also determined that that the Amehcan Water contract costs have held 
within the limits of regional inflation and within the contract renewal terms 
established three years ago; and based on the comparative information, the 
American Water contract fee continues to appear reasonable and within the 
expected marketplace costs that were determined by public procurement bidding 
when they were originally contracted. 

LAND ACQUISITION TO PROTECT WATER SUPPLY. In 2004, we acquired 53.5 
acres to protect water quality of Lily Pond and the Aaron River Reservoir, including 
the gift of 20 acres from the Wheelwright and Bates Families. We expended about 
$784,000 to acquire 31 acres of watershed land in cooperation with the Cohasset 
Conservation Trust and the Cohasset Preservation Committee. In December, we 
applied for state matching funds of about $454,300 to acquire an additional 71 
acres in the watershed for Lily Pond and the Aaron River Reservoir. These land 
acquisitions represent long term protection for the integrity of the Town of 
Cohasset public drinking water supply for decades to come and are some of the 
most important accomplishments of the Water Department in the past twenty-five 
years. 

SRF LOW INTEREST LOANS. On October 15, we submitted loan applications for 
$20 million for the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (SRF) program and 
$497,500 for the Clean Water Act SRF program. Full design plans for rehabilitation 
of 1 1 miles of water mains and major improvements (totaling over $2,000,000) to 
the Lily Pond Treatment Plant were Included with the application. The Drinking 
Water SRF projects are planned to be completed over the next 6 years. The Clean 
Water SRF projects, which will retrofit stormwater structures and make landscape 
improvements to reduce pollutant loading into Lily Pond and the Aaron River 
Reservoir, will be completed over the next 3 years. 

WHOLESALE SALE OF WATER TO LINDEN PONDS. In 2004, we took a 
number of major steps to effectuate the sale of water to Linden Ponds in Hingham. 
On March 4, we filed a request for determination of insignificance under the 
Interbasin Transfer Act with the Massachusetts Water Resources Commission to 
allow us to supply a maximum of 306,000 gallons a day to Linden Ponds. This 
Interbasin Transfer determination was required because Cohasset is in the South 
Coastal Basin and Hingham is in the Weir River subbasin of the Boston Harbor 
Basin. After two public hearings, the Water Resources Commission voted 



173 



unanimously on November 4 that the transfer was insignificant and did not require 
an Interbasin Transfer Permit and could proceed. 

On March 4 we submitted an application for a Water Withdrawal Permit to the 
DEP. DEP decided to take no action on the application until a decision regarding 
the Interbasin Transfer Application was completed and had not issues a decision 
as of the end of 2004. 

We applied for and received the necessary Orders of Conditions from the 
Cohasset and Hingham Conservation Commissions to construct the 12-inch water 
main from Hingham Lumber to the Hingham town line which will convey the water 
to the Hingham system that they will "wheel" to Linden Ponds. The water main and 
pump station will be constructed and paid for by Linden Ponds. 
We applied for and received the necessary permits and approvals to reconstruct 
the Bound Brook Control Structure and the fish ladder at the Reservoir which are 
needed to allow us to control the flow of water from the Reservoir to ensure that 
sufficient flow exists for the fish populations using Bound Brook and the Aaron 
River Reservoir. These improvements, required to effectuate the sale of water to 
Linden Ponds, will be paid for by Linden Ponds. 

ASSISTANCE TO AQUARION IN HINGHAM & HULL. The Water Department 
was pleased to come to the assistance of the Aquarion Water Company when they 
had a major main break on Kilby Street on October 7. Staff of the Cohasset Water 
Dept. worked with Aquarion staff during the day, along with the Fire Chiefs of 
Cohasset and Hull, to temporarily connect the two water systems by connecting 
two fire hydrants. We provided dhnking water to North Cohasset and part of Hull 
for four days; from Thursday, October 7 through Monday, October 1 1 which gave 
the Hingham-Hull system time to recover from the water main break. 

DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS. In 2004, continuing our long-range 
water distribution system capital improvements plan first prepared by Tutela 
Engineering in 1996, we replaced a total of 7,500 feet (1 .42 miles) of undersized 
water mains on North Main Street, Redgate Lane, Jerusalem Road Drive, and 
Haystack Lane. We also moved 20 water services from a 6-inch water main to a 
10-inch water main in North Main Street from Forest Ave. to Rocky Lane to 
improve their water services, and replaced about 20 other water services on North 
Main Street. 

As of Dec. 31 , the Water Department is managing a major drainage and roadway 
improvement project on Newtonville Lane for the Town, along with the installation 
of about 750 feet of new 8-inch water main to loop Newtonville Lane with Elm 
Court (which was completed on Dec. 24). We completed the paving and 
associated roadway improvements on South Main Street, Hill Street, Norfolk Road, 
and Oak Street, and placed a leveling course on North Main Street (Rocky Lane to 
Jerusalem Road) to provide a level surface until the road can be resurfaced curb to 
curb in the spring. Our planned replacement of water mains in Gammons Road 
had to be delayed until spring, 2005. 

In the 10 years since the water emergency in 1994, caused because of problems 
in the distribution system, we have replaced or rehabilitated 14.6 miles or about 



174 



46% of the 36 miles of water mains in the distribution system, which has improved 
water sen/ice throughout Cohasset and has resulted in major improvements in 
public safety by increasing fire flows in fire hydrants. 

FIRE HYDRANTS & VALVES. In 2004, we replaced 10 fire hydrants, installed 10 
new hydrants, and painted 90% of our 369 hydrants. We replaced one gate valve 
and installed 10 new gate valves. 

WATER QUALITY SUMMIT MARCH 6. To fully explore all issues and options for 
improving drinking water quality, the Water Commission on March 6 convened a 
meeting with all our engineering consultants to review taste & odor, disinfection 
byproducts, and other water quality issues. 

TASTE & ODOR STUDY. The Water Commission, as part of it's on-going efforts 
to provide safe, high-quality drinking water to consumers, had Norfolk Ram Group 
conduct a Drinking Water Taste and Odor Study to evaluate the characteristics of 
Cohasset's drinking water and to identify possible actions to improve the overall 
aesthetic quality of tap water. The first phase of the Taste and Odor Study 
consisted of a baseline water quality evaluation comprised of twelve (12) water 
samples collected on November 17, 2003 from municipal buildings (6), businesses 
(2), and residences (4) located throughout the Town of Cohasset water service 
area. 

A Comprehensive Water Quality Survey was mailed to all of the approximately 
2,500 water customers on March 3 to compile consumer input regarding water use 
patterns and the perceived aesthetic quality of Cohasset's water. A total of 472 
Survey replies were received and evaluated. Following the survey, detailed 
laboratory testing and a Flavor Profile Analysis were completed, on April 26, 2004, 
on fifty samples randomly collected throughout the water service area. The 
comprehensive sampling event included (1) in home testing for pH, temperature 
and chlorine residual; (2) laboratory water quality testing of samples collected from 
ten locations; and, (3) Flavor Profile Analysis to identify the predominant taste and 
odor characteristics of the water. 

McGuire Environmental Consultants, Inc (McGuire) completed a Flavor Profile 
Analysis, on April 27-30, 2004, on all 50 samples using ten panels of four people 
each to evaluate the water. This analysis indicated that Cohasset's water displays 
characteristics predominantly described as having musty, old pipe, metallic or 
damp paper odors and flavors. 

McGuire also noted that, although many of the odors and flavors were not 
aesthetically pleasing, the reported intensities were all in the very weak range, with 
an intensity rating that was 2 or less on a scale ranging from 1 (low) to 12 (high). 
The Report was revised through November 3 with copies available and provided 
on Adobe PDF format. A supplemental round of water quality testing was 
completed on Tuesday, October 12, to address the metallic taste in the drinking 
water. This testing included on-site measurements (pH, temperature and chlorine 
residual) and the collection of samples for laboratory analysis primarily for metals 
(copper, zinc, iron, aluminum and manganese), TOC/DOC, TSS, color, algae, and 
algae by-products. A total of twelve samples were collected from 5 residences, the 



175 



Cohasset transfer station, the 2 water tanks, the treatment plant inlet and outlet, 
Lily Pond, and the Aaron River Reservoir. These results will be incorporated into 
an updated Report. 

DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS (DBPs). 2004 was the first year that the federal 
and state standard which limited the level of Total Trihalomethanes (TTHM), a 
DBP, in tap water to 80 parts per billion (ppb) applied to small systems under 
10,000 population like Cohasset. Despite the fact that we have been working on 
measures to ensure compliance with this new standard, in 2004 we exceeded the 
standard with a Running Annual Average of 100 ppb. The Water Commission's 
Treatment Plant consultant, Weston & Sampson (W&S), prepared a Disinfection 
Byproduct Compliance Study in March. At the water quality workshop on March 6, 
disinfection byproducts were also discussed. The Commission had American 
Water convene a Disinfection Byproduct (DBP) Task Force (including American, 
Aquarion, Tutela, Nort'olk Ram, W&S) which met during the summer with 
recommendations made in August 30, 2004 for Tier 1 Improvements (to be 
completed within 1 year) and Tier 2 Improvements (long-range recommendations 
based on outcome of Tier 1 Improvements). 
Tier I improvements that were implemented in 2004 included: 
March - Enhanced coagulation, by adding larger amounts of aluminum sulfate 
coagulant, began. Enhanced coagulation removes additional organic matter 
through the treatment process, which should help in reducing DBPs. 
August - Reduced the amount of chlorine added to the treated water. 
September- Potassium permanganate addition was implemented. An oxidant 
helps remove organics and reduce the chlorine demand of the water. By reducing 
the chlorine demand, less chlorine can be added, causing less DBPs to be 
produced. 

December - Polyaluminum chloride addition was added to the treatment process. 
The purpose is better organic removal, which should further reduce DBPs. As of 
Dec. 31, this change had been too recent to determine its effectiveness, although 
there are indications that the organic removal through the plant has increased. 
Tier i improvements planned to be implemented in 2005: 
March, 2005 - Installation of baffles in the Clearwell in the Treatment Plant, which 
is anticipated to reduce DBPs by reducing the amount of chlorinated organics while 
still keeping the required chlorine contact time to protect public health. 
April, 2005 - Installation of mixers in the two Water Storage Tanks, to reduce water 
age by constantly mixing the water as it enters and exits the tanks. The mixers will 
be installed following the installation of the clearwell baffles. 

TREATMENT PLANT OPTIMIZATION. During 2004, American Water, together 
with consultant Tom Sawyer, has re-evaluated and made changes and/or mid- 
course corrections to the operation of the water treatment plant. This optimization 
process is aimed at continually reviewing operational data and the performance of 
each of the unit operations, which comprise the water treatment process. The 
focus of the optimization effort has been to achieve the maximum possible 
treatment levels within the physical constraints of the existing facilities. The 



176 



optimization process has led to initiation of process improvements such as liquid 
polymer addition, potassium permanganate addition, and several instrumentation 
and control improvements. In addition, process control through increased 
laboratory testing and process monitoring has been stepped up. The changes, first 
to enhanced coagulation using aluminum sulfate and then to the upgrade and full- 
scale pilot testing (following application to and approval by the DEP) of 
polyaluminum chloride have all been supported by these improvements. 

LILY POND TREATMENT PLANT IMPROVEMENTS. In addition to the 

improvements noted above, in 2004 Weston & Sampson completed the design and 

planning to make the following needed improvements and upgrades to the 

Treatment Plant in 2005 as part of the Dhnking Water SRF low interest loan 

program: 

Replace the filter media (improve water quality by reducing color and turbidity). 

Replace raw water pump and motors and install Variable Frequency Drives (to 

improve operating flexibility of water through and from the plant and reduce 

electrical cost). 

Add chemical feed pacing from the raw water flow meter (enable chemical feed 

pacing with variable raw and finished water flows). 

Replace raw water and finished water flow meters (improve accuracy through the 

new meters and replacement of original equipment). 

Replace flow and pressure transmitters (some transmitters are not working; 

replacement will give operators more flexibility in terms of remote monitoring of 

processes). 

Replace rapid mixer drives with variable speed drives which will increase ability to 

optimize mixing of coagulant chemicals with raw water quality. 

Replace microscreens with new screens equipped with an air burst system at 

intake structure (allow operators to remove vegetation from intake screens more 

effectively and more efficiently). 

Modify bar rack at intake structure by adding bars to reduce opening size to 

increase the removal of vegetation/debris that enters the treatment processes. 

WATERSHED PROTECTION. The Water Commission employs Norfolk Ram 
Group to conduct watershed protection work for the Water Department. In 2004 
this included: 

Grant Opportunities and Applications. In 2004 the Water Commission prepared 
and submitted the Clean Water State Revolving Fund 2004 Project Application, 
dated October 15, 2004, that included engineering plans and specifications, and 
permit applications, for the Cohasset Stormwater BMP Implementation Project, 
and submitted an application on December 7 for the Drinking Water Supply 
Protection Grant: a Land Purchase Grant Program that provides 50% EOEA grant 
funds for land purchases application. 
Review of Watershed Threats. 
Review of Development Projects 



177 



STORM WATER BMPS. With funds from our Section 319 Grant ($255,000) and 
the 2% low interest loans for $497,500 from the Clean Water SRF (CWSRF) 
program, over the next three years we will implement both structural and non- 
structural solutions for eliminating and/or reducing nonpoint source pollution in the 
watershed for Lily Pond and the Aaron River Watershed. The S. 319 grant was 
awarded in 2003; we submitted the formal loan application for the CWSRF loans 
on October 15, 2004, and expect to begin construction in 2005. This Project will 
utilize structural best management practice (BMP) solutions and will incorporate low 
impact development (LID) strategies wherever possible to contain and minimize off- 
site flows and pollutant loading in these areas. Structural BMP improvement options 
to be considered will include; hooded catchbasins, bioretention facilities. Rain 
Gardens, roadside swales with biofilters and spill containment facilities. 

POTENTIAL INFLUENCE OF SEPTIC SYSTEMS ON WATER QUALITY. On 

February 10, the Norfolk Ram Group conducted a supplemental round of surface 
water quality sampling to investigate potential impacts that could be attributed to 
the use of septic systems within the Zone A Surface Water Protection Area for Lily 
Pond and the Aaron River Reservoir. The supplemental investigation consisted of 
the collection of fourteen (14) surface water samples from locations in and around 
Lily Pond, the Aaron River Reservoir and tributaries thereto. The testing completed 
to date indicates that bacteria is present throughout the watershed in various 
concentrations, most likely contributed via natural sources such as warm-blooded 
animals. The highest bacteria concentrations appear to be associated with 
stormwater runoff from developed areas such as along Peppermint Brook (an area 
served by municipal sewer). While the sampling did not find conclusive evidence 
that septic systems were contaminating Lily Pond, the October test results did 
indicate higher than background bacteria concentrations in the samples collected 
from the outlet of the stream from the South Swamp area in Scituate and from the 
two samples collected within the Aaron River (Doane Street and Behind Riverview 
Drive). 

QUARTERLY MONITORING. Our Quarterly surface water testing indicates that 
while the water supply is not impacted by "hazardous" chemicals (i.e. volatile 
organic compounds, PCB's, perchlorate and priority pollutant metals) the extensive 
wetlands system within the watershed contributes to relatively high concentrations 
of natural organic compounds, minerals and nutrients in the surface water supply. 
The surface waters are also rather turbid and are typically highly colored (100 to 
250 color units). The water quality sampling conducted to date indicates that the 
overall quality of the water within the Aaron River Reservoir may be better (DOC, 
TOC, DO and algae) than within Lily Pond. 

COHASSET HEIGHTS LANDFILL. The Commission still keeps a watchful eye on 
the Cohasset Heights Landfill since it is located in the watershed for Lily Pond. The 
Commission had the Norfolk Ram Group review the "BWP SW 1 1 Landfill - Major 
Modification for the Cohasset Heights Landfill" permit application submitted to 
DEP) by Cohasset Heights Ltd. which was prepared by SITEC Environmental Inc. 



178 



of Marshfield, dated June 14, 2004. The application requested approval of the 
following: (1 ) Replace 1 .6 acres of vegetative layer (grass and topsoil) with 
processed/recycled asphalt on the top of the landfill. (2) Allow the landfill to use 
manufactured topsoil for the vegetative layer over the entire landfill - the topsoil 
would consist of a mix of sand with Short Paper Fiber (SPF) in a 1 :1 to 1 : 1 .5 SPF: 
sand ratio. (3) Allow storage of empty roll off containers on the processed/recycled 
pavement on the top of the landfill. Norfolk Ram reviewed the application and 
prepared a Memorandum that has been forwarded to SITEC for consideration that 
recommended eliminating the Short Paper Fiber, which has contaminants, which 
could leach, into the watershed. SITEC has indicated that they are eliminating the 
Short Paper Fiber manufactured topsoil from the application. 
Norfolk Ram Group has been sampling four bedrock monitoring wells located 
between CHL and Lily Pond quarterly since the first quarter of 2001 , with testing 
completed for volatile organic compounds, 13 priority pollutant metals, and 
background chemistry. This sampling has not detected any contaminants 
migrating from CHL toward Lily Pond. Since the concentrations of each tested 
parameter have remained fairly consistent throughout the testing program, in 2004 
this sampling program has been reduced to an annual event. 

SOURCE WATER ASSESSMENT & PROTECTION (SWAP) REPORT. On 

January 16, the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) 
issued the final SWAP Report for the Cohasset Water Department. The SWAP 
report identifies the sources of Cohasset public drinking water supply, the 
protection areas around those supplies, inventories the potential sources of 
contamination, and makes a number of recommendations to improve protection of 
our water supplies. The Cohasset Water Commission, in its ongoing watershed 
protection program, following the 2002 Surface Water Supply Protection Plan, is 
planning on implementing the recommendations of the SWAP along with the many 
other water supply protection measures already unden^/ay. 

CIS MAPPING. The Water Commission has been developing Geographic 
Information Systems for watershed protection and to support land acquisition 
efforts. For the Commission, Norfolk Ram Group has developed GIS page-size 
maps of Assessor lots in areas south and west of Lily Pond, and prepared three 
town meeting article maps in support of Town Meeting action to acquire numerous 
open space parcels within the Zone A & B of the water supply watershed. 

STREAM FLOW MONITORING. The Stream Flow Monitoring Project implements 
two tasks recommended in the Water Commission's Surface Water Supply 
Protection Plan (SWSPP) for Lily Pond and Aaron River Reservoir: 
Hydrogeological assessment, and Water balance evaluation for water entering and 
existing Lily Pond and the Aaron River Reservoir. Stream-flow analysis suggests 
that the majority of the inflow to Lily Pond comes from Brass Kettle Brook (the 
average rate of water discharge through Brass Kettle Brook was 1 .18 cubic feet 
per second (cfs) with a peak rate of 12.07 cfs and a minimum rate of 0.003 cfs). 
Peppermint Brook does not produce as significant of a contribution to Lily Pond as 



179 



Brass Kettle Brook (the average rate of water discharge through Peppermint Brook 
was 0.48 cfs with a peak rate of 7.23 cfs and a minimum rate of 0.06 cfs). 

CEDARMERE. On October 29 Water Commission consultant, Norfolk Ram 
Group, submitted comments on behalf of the Commission to the Executive Office 
of Environmental Affairs (EOEA) MEPA Office on the Environmental Notification 
Form, EOEA # 13378, filed by the Cedarmere Senior Multi-family Residence for 
their 105 unit proposed development. We recommended that EOEA require that 
the design of the development minimize the drainage of contaminants to the Lily 
Pond watershed. In the EOEA's November 8 Certificate on the ENF, EOEA 
required DEP to "address all of the wastewater issues raised by the Norfolk Ram 
Group in its comment letter during review of the Groundwater Discharge Permit for 
the project" and that "the proponent should, to the maximum extent possible, direct 
all stormwater from paved areas away from Lily Pond watershed.... [and] work with 
the Cohasset Water Commission on reducing pollutant loading and to use DEP- 
approved stormwater management technologies for discharges to critical areas on 
the project site...." 

REGIONAL PLANNING & COOPERATION. The Water Commission keeps in 
frequent contact with officials and residents in Scituate and Norwell, where most of 
our watershed is located. Commission Chairman McNabb attended a South Shore 
Visioning Session in Norwell on January 15 where many regional issues, including 
water supply protection, were discussed. 

MMA CONSULTING GROUP REPORT. In March, the MMA Consulting Group Inc. 
prepared a report for the Selectmen, Review of the Town Manager Form of 
Government in Cohasset. This report, among other things, recommended that the 
elected Board of Water Commissioners, which now has exclusive control over the 
Water Department, be changed to a board appointed by the Selectmen that would 
act only in an advisory capacity - the Water Department would then be run by a 
new position, Manager of Municipal Infrastructure who would be appointed by the 
Town Manager. In a March 23 memo to the Selectmen, the Water Commission 
asked the Selectmen to reject that recommendation because it was not adequately 
supported by any reasons, ignored the many positive features of the current 
structure, and was based on the erroneous assumption that the Water Commission 
was merely an "administrative" board when in fact the Water Commission is a 
policy making Board. The Selectmen did not take any action as a result of this 
report. 

TOWN MEETINGS. At the March 27 Annual Town Meeting the Town approved 
Article 13, to allow us to acquire 100 acres of watershed land, Article 15 to accept 
a donation of land from the Wheelwright Family, Article 1 6, to authorize the 
Town to acquire the "Old Road" in the Lily Pond watershed to protect land from 
development. Article 17, to borrow $3,000,000 for capital improvements, and 
Article 18 to borrow up to $23million under the state SRF 2% low interest loan 
programs. We withdrew Article 19, which would have authorized the Water 



180 



Commission to make long-term contracts of up to 40 years to sell water out of 

town. 

At the December 7 Special Town Meeting the Town voted to approve Article 12, to 

release a parcel of cemetery land for use by the Water Commission to build a 

pumping station for the sale of water to Linden Ponds, and Article 13, to borrow 

$2,000,000 to pay for the settlement on the Wolf Pits and for further capital 

improvements. 

AARON RIVER DAM. We cleared brush, replaced rip rap, filled and regraded the 
driving surface at the top of the dam, seeded an fertilized the slopes, replaced 
broken fencing, and repaired the emergency spillway of the Aaron River Dam to 
protect the integrity of the dam and bring it to current state standards for dam 
safety. Our consultant, Weston & Sampson, conducted the required Dam Safety 
Inspection for the state, which concluded that the Dam is in excellent condition. 
W&S also completed the Aaron River Dam Emergency Action Plan. 

SLUDGE DISPOSAL. Synagro removed all the sludge from the Plant's two sludge 
lagoons, allowing the lagoons to be inspected and rehabilitated during 2005. The 
sludge was dewatered onsite using portable dewatering equipment, and the 
residual dried sludge was hauled to an approved landfill. On March 23, we 
submitted an application, which was continued without a decision, to the Sewer 
Commission to dispose treatment sludge in town sewer. 

AVALON 40B PROJECT APPEAL. In May, Avalon Cohasset, Inc, filed a Motion 
to Dismiss the appeal (Land Court Miscellaneous Case No. 294252) filed by the 
Water Commission, which seeks to overturn the Comprehensive Permit granted by 
the Zoning Board of Appeals on October 27, 2003 for a 200-unit development in 
the Lily Pond Watershed. On June 15, the Water Commission filed its Opposition 
to the Motion to Dismiss. A hearing on the Motion was held June 23 in Land Court 
before Judge Sands. No decision had been made on the Motion to Dismiss as of 
December 31, 2004. 

WELLFIELDS. Both wellfields are still out of service. In July our contractor, DH 
Mahar, drilled nine exploratory wells looking for a new location for the Sohier Street 
Wells, which have to be relocated because the current ones are too close to the 
Greenbush Rail right of way - but all came up dry. We will continue to explore 
other potential locations. We demolished the garage at the pumphouse of the 
Ellms Meadow Wellfield, where new wells were installed a few years ago and a 
new pumphouse is planned to be built in 2006. 

WOLF PIT SETTLEMENT. On November 16, following a 7-hour mediation in 
October, the Water Commission accepted a settlement of $562,500, in addition to 
the $150,000 (for a total of $712,500) already paid to the owners of the Wolf Pit 
when we took it by eminent domain in 2001 . The owners sued (Norfolk C.A. No, 
2003-00473) to collect $2,000,000 for the taking. At the December 6 Special Town 
Meeting voters approved an article allowing the Water Commission to borrow and 



181 



appropriate the funds to pay the settlement. The Water Commission took the 6.7- 
acre Wolf Pit property in 2001 , following Town Meeting authorization, to protect this 
critical area from development. Protection of the Wolf Pit from development is 
critical, since the property is located at the end of Beechwood Street, drains 
directly into the Aaron River, which flows toward Lily Pond, and abuts the Aaron 
River Reservoir. 

ACCESS TO SCITUATE HILL WATER TANK. In 2004, the Water Commission 
requested Senator Hedlund and Rep. Bradley to refile for the 2005-2006 legislative 
session legislation to require the Massachusetts Highway Department (MHD) to 
provide permanent access for the Water Department to the Scituate Hill Water 
Tank over the MHD property off Crocker Lane. The bill filed in the 2003-2004 
legislative session was not successful. 

SECURITY. To comply with the federal Bioterrorism Act, we hired a contractor who 
prepared a Vulnerability Analysis and revised our Emergency Response Plan. The 
Vulnerability Analysis included a number of recommendations for improving 
security that the Water Commission is reviewing. 

COOPERATION WITH OTHER TOWN DEPARTMENTS. The Cohasset Water 

Department cooperated with many other Town of Cohasset departments during 

2004 including: 

Worked with the Community Preservation Committee and other town officials and 

boards, as well as with the Trustees of Reservations and the Cohasset 

Conservation Trust, to acquire land in the Lily Pond Watershed. 

Managing the Newtonville Lane drainage and roadway reconstruction project, 

including installing a water main loop from Newtonville to Elm court, for the Town. 

Coordinating paving with the Highway Department on South Main Street, Bancroft 

Road, Hill Street, Norfolk Road, and Oak Street. 

Assisted the Public Works Department with storm drainage problems on Jerusalem 

Road Drive and Haystack Lane. 

Improved water service at Central Cemetery and provided seasonal services for 

protection of the service lines. 

Provided the Fire Department access to the Treatment Plant site for training 

practices. 

The Water Department does billing for the Sewer Department. 

CONCLUSION. The strength and successes of today's Water Department have 
been possible because of the vision and extraordinary efforts of the Water 
Commission and staff in the 1970's, to conceptualize, design, permit, and build the 
Aaron River Reservoir and the Lily Pond Treatment Plant which turned Cohasset 
from a water-poor town to a water-rich town. 

During 2004, the Cohasset Water Commission has taken many major steps, which 
have succeeded in producing continued improvements to fire protection, 
watershed protection, and drinking water quality for our ratepayers in Cohasset. 



182 



We have accomplished these important achievements within our current rate 
structure, since our financial position remains excellent. 

The Board of Water Commissioners and the Water Department would like to thank 
all the Town officials, boards, citizens, and committees who have assisted the 
Water Department and the Board throughout 2004. We will continue to seek 
improvements to the water system and in water quality in the coming years for the 
benefit of all ratepayers and the Town of Cohasset. 

Respectfully submitted 

BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 

John K. McNabb, Jr., Chairman 
Glenn A. Pratt, Vice-Chairman 
Nathaniel Palmer, Clerk 



183 



WATER RESOURCES PROTECTION COMMITTEE 

In 2004 the Water Commission requested the Board of Selectmen to 
reactivate the Water Resources Protection Committee. The Committee serves as 
an advisory group to investigate sources of pollution to the town's water resources 
and to make policy recommendations to Town Meeting and town boards and 
committees. 

The reactivated Committee met seven times in 2004. The initial meeting in 
June centered around presentations by John McNabb, Water Commissioner, and 
Mark Bartlett of Norfolk Ram, the Water Department's watershed protection 
consultant. Covered in these presentations were the official charge of the Water 
Resource Protection Committee, the Water Department's Surface Water Supply 
Protection Plan, and the Water Department's concems about increased nutrient 
loading on Lily Pond. 

During subsequent meetings, members voiced a concern about protecting 
our fresh water and salt water resources as well as our drinking water from 
pollution resulting from lawn care practices. Thus, the Committee decided to focus 
on lawn care as a priority and decided that the best course of action at this time 
was a voluntary educational program for the entire Town on the hazards of 
chemical lawn care and the benefits of organic lawn care. A similar program had 
already been initiated on a smaller scale in the spring by a group effort of the 
Conservation Committee, the Open Space Committee, the Board of Health, the 
Water Department, and the Community Garden Club of Cohasset. 

Subsequent meetings reviewed efforts already taking place in Cohasset, 
investigated similar efforts in other communities, and evaluated how these might 
translate into a successful program for Cohasset. In September the Committee 
became aware of a tumkey program, the GreenScapes Program, which was 
developed by the North and South Rivers Watershed Association (NSRWA), and 
invited their representatives to make a presentation to the Committee in October. 

The presentation by Samantha Woods, NSRWA's Executive Director, 
convinced the Committee that the GreenScapes Program is the most economical, 
potentially effective, and quickest way to get Cohasset's program underway. The 
GreenScapes Program is a public outreach developed under public grant by the 
nonprofit North and South Rivers Watershed Association. 

The GreenScapes program had been adopted by seven South Shore towns 
(Duxbury, Marshfield, Scituate, Pembroke, Plymouth, Weymouth, and West 
Bridgewater) in 2004 and by eight others (Abington, Cohasset, Kingston, Hanover, 
Hingham, Hull, Norwell, and Rockland) for 2005. In its first year the program was 
well received as a professionally designed and locally focused effort that brought 
eariy benefits to those participants. 

At the December 6 Special Town Meeting, voters unanimously approved 
Article 17, which will provide $5,000 to fund this program-50% of the funding will be 
from Water Revenue and the rest from the General Fund. Any funds left over will 
be used by the Committee to support other educational programs in Cohasset on 
environmentally safe lawn care practices. 



184 



GreenScapes is a comprehensive education program providing practical 
and pragmatic natural green landscape practices relying on natural organic 
fertilizers and non-chemical methods of pest management. GreenScapes will 
provide instruction in the use of effective and inexpensive natural alternatives to 
commercial pesticides and herbicides and fertilizers, and provides training in lawn 
maintenance, lawn alternatives, integrated pest management, stormwater 
management, recycling, and composting. Hands-on workshops will demonstrate 
efficient approaches to making lawn maintenance more natural and less costly and 
labor intensive. 

The Water Commission supports GreenScapes because the major 
environmental threat affecting Lily Pond (and other water bodies like Little Harbor) 
is excess nutrients from stormwater runoff from lawns, driveways & roads, and this 
program will help reduce that nutrient loading into Lily Pond. 

Due to the urgent need to address the nutrient loading in our drinking water 
supply and other water bodies, a winter initiation of the program will be best for the 
2005 growing season and will reap benefits to the town. This is a voluntary 
program. Participants should see immediate benefits such as: 

Reduced Water Bills 

Lower Costs for Fertilizers and Chemicals 

Lower Maintenance Time 

Less Exposure to Hazardous Chemicals 

More Habitat for Wildlife 

Reduced Stormwater Pollution 

Increased Property Value and More Free Time 

The Water Resource Protection Committee is eager to resume meetings in 
2005 and to begin work on implementing GreenScapes, and appreciates the 
support of Town Meeting and all town boards, committees, and officials for our 
efforts. 

RESPECTFULLY SUBMITTED, 
Water Resource Protection Committee 

James Kinch, Chairman, Citizen Member 
Karen Quigley, Secretary, Citizen Member 
John McNabb, Board of Water Commissioners 
Fred Koed, Board of Selectmen 
Stuart Ivimey, Planning Board 
Debbie Cook, Conservation Committee 
Steve Bobo, Board of Health 
Sandy Durant, Open Space Committee 
Bill Baird, Citizen Member 



185 



SEWER COMMISSION ANNUAL REPORT 

The Little Harbor/Atlantic Avenue Sewer Expansion design project lias been 
continuing over tiie course of the spring and summer. High school students were 
hired by the CEES group to aid in these efforts by researching Board of Health 
records to collect relevant data which could aid in the design and layout of the 
individual house services within the proposed expansion district. The March 2004 
Annual Town Meeting appropriated $100,000 to be applied to design efforts and 
permitting in order to complete the collection system design plans initiated by prior 
appropriations, which were being developed by Tutela Engineering Associates. 
Due to fiscal limitations on the Town resulting from the delay in School Building 
reimbursements, actual construction activity was not projected to begin until 2007 
for this expansion. 

The Commission continued its infiltration/inflow (I/I) program in 2004 to reduce the 
influence of storms and tidal action on the original collection system piping. In 
January and February several pipe reaches were cleaned, tested, and sealed to 
reduce extraneous flow influences. Sewer service connection points were also 
sealed and badly damaged pipe sections were lined to reduce infiltration and 
leakage into the system. In the Spring the Commission began a program to re- 
inspect previous sump pump locations to ensure that they were not illegally 
pumping into the sewer system. In late November a new flow monitoring program 
was initiated to reassess I/I prone areas of the existing sewer collection system. 
Results should be available in 2005. We also inspected all the watertight manhole 
cover gaskets and installed 118 manhole inserts in order to eliminate these 
potential sources of inflow. 

The Central Treatment Plant operated very successfully throughout the year. 
Capacity issues have consumed a significant amount of the Commission's time 
this year due to litigation and political pressures brought on behalf of individual lot 
owners as well as proposed developments such as Cedarmere, Avalon, the Cook 
Estate, and Jerusalem Road Estates. The Commission remains committed to 
satisfying the outstanding judicial judgment requirements as well as helping to 
eliminate existing pollution sources. For this reason the Commission will continue 
to strive, within the law, to provide service for existing homes with its limited 
treatment capacity before any consideration is given to new developments. 

At the special Town Meeting in December the Board of Selectmen and Sewer 
Commission were directed by a substantial majority vote to take such action as 
may be necessary to cause the engineering documents, specifications, and 
corresponding cost estimates for the Little Harbor and Atlantic Avenue sewer 
expansion projects to be completed expeditiously and an article for the approval 
and funding of such project to be included in the Warrant for the 2005 Annual 
Town Meeting. The appropriate warrant articles were prepared by the Sewer 
Commission for timely submittal for inclusion in the Warrant for the 2005 Annual 
Town Meeting. 



186 



Respectfully submitted, 

John Beck, Clerk 

Sean Cunning, Vice-Chairman 

Raymond Kasperowicz, Chairman 



187 



REPORT OF THE HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



1. We continue to sell Minot Light 1-4-3 teeshirts and sweatshirts at the Annual 
Art Festival and at the Paper Store. We also donated shirts when packages 
were sent to the Cohasset men and women serving in the Armed Forces. 
Hamilton Tewksbury coordinates this project. 

2. Our member Paula Morse serves on the Community Preservation Fund 
Committee. 

3. David Wadsworth worked with the Cohasset Historical Society in securing 
National Register Listings for the Wilson House and the Maritime Museum. 

4. Work on trying to get a Demolition Delay bylaw for the Town of Cohasset as 
part of the long-range goals of the Growth and Development Committee and 
Zoning Advisory Board. Commission worked with bylaws from neighboring 
towns and state Historic Commission to develop a bylaw for our town. 
Members met with the Zoning Advisory Board to go over plans. Following 
the advice of the town manager, the bylaw was submitted as a general by- 
law V. a zoning bylaw, with a 50 year cut-off criterion. The by-law did not 
pass. We continue to work on it to be resubmitted. 

5. The Cohasset Roundhouse and Turntable were excavated this fall as part of 
an archeological dig connected with the train coming to Cohasset. Under 
the federal guidelines, the Historic Commission is responsible for the 
signage and preservation of the site. Members of the Commission visited a 
site in Whitman, and we are now putting together our plans for a small park 
to commemorate the Roundhouse. At this time, we also would like to thank 
the Fire Department for the use of their men and ladder truck in order to get 
aerial shots of the site. 

6. We thank John Connell for serving on the Board for the past 4 years, and in 
January we welcomed Nathaniel Palmer and Marilyn Morrison to the board. 



Respectfully dubmitted, 

Noel Ripley, Chairman 

Becky Bates-McArthur, Secretary 

Ham Tewksbury 

Paula Morse 

Marilyn Morrison 

Nathaniel Palmer 

David Wadsworth 



188 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON TOWN HISTORY 

Treasury of Cohasset History 

Author Jacqueline M. Dormitzer, during the course of her research for the Narrative 
History of Cohasset, Volume III, discovered a series of interesting pamphlets and 
articles about our town that pre-dated the time period she was covering and had 
not been included in the previous two volumes published by the town. 

During the past year, Jackie organized and edited these articles, Harold P. 
Coughlin created the design and production files and James Hamilton coordinated 
the printing production for this book - the same team that produced the third 
volume of our history and reprinted the first two volumes. Our town owes them a 
big vote of thanks. 

In January 2005, the Committee on Town History published Treasury of Cohasset 
History, a hard cover book, 226 pages in length, designed to complement our three 
volumes of history. Funding comes from the Committee on Town History book 
account, which has also supplied the money for the digital republication of volumes 
I and II and for the Cohasset schools' continuing first grade and middle school 
social studies curriculum town timeline, history panels, and map reproduction. 

A cost-conscious marketing effort offering a 15% discount during December 
resulted in brisk pre-publication sales. Fliers were handed out at the Village Fair 
and at the December Town Meeting. All the churches that print a newsletter for 
their parishioners cooperated by mailing the fliers as inserts. Several articles 
printed in the Cohasset Manner also boosted sales. Buttonwood Books will be the 
retail outlet for the subsequent sales. 

This fourth book was made possible by the extraordinary sales success of Jackie's 
volume III - nearly 2,500 books sold - and by the initial support of the town. The 
Committee on Town History has been able to print and safely store the three 
Cohasset Narrative histories in a special room at Town Hall, generate a self- 
funded educational program, which includes maps and history panels, and now 
offers a fourth volume of historic articles, reminiscences, and curiosities. 

During the preparation of volume III, the Town of Cohasset was recognized by the 
Library of Congress as the publishing entity of our history books. Present and 
future publications have been assigned ISBN numbers so that our collection can 
more easily be purchased by libraries and individuals. 

Future plans include a second Treasury of additional historical material that Jackie 
has been organizing. 



189 



Ruzicka Wood Engraving of Minot Light 

This past spring, tlie Town received a surprise gift of 130 letterpress-printed 
l<eepsal<es, dated 1942, depicting Minot Light. Selma Ordewer of Southbury, 
Connecticut, executrix of the estate of Daniel Berkeleym Bianchi, felt that Cohasset 
should be the recipient of these unique prints because of our historical connection 
with Minot Light. The original wood blocks for the print are in the entire Ruzicka 
collection of the Boston Athenaeum. 

The Committee tested the market for the prints during the Village Fair and 
determined $60 per print was a fair price that townspeople would be willing to pay. 
Each print is tipped into an acid-free matte and is inserted into an acetate envelope 
with the provenance of the prints, which are numbered from one to 130. 

The Cohasset Mariner helped the successful marketing effort by running two 
successive articles describing the print and reproducing it in color. All sales 
revenues, after expenses, are returned to the Town's Committee on Town History 
account to help fund future projects. 

Wigmore A. Pierson 

Chairman, Committee on Town History 



190 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PAUL PRATT MEMORIAL LIBRARY 

Cohasset continues to appreciate the new facility at Ripley Road; 91% of residents 
have library cards, and circulation has increased 35% during the past fiscal year. 
The public Internet computers are in use throughout the day, and it is now possible 
to access research materials, to browse our collection, and to reserve museum 
passes from home. 

Our Children's Program under the leadership of Children's librarian Sharon Moody 
has experienced tremendous growth, with 4,091 children and caregivers attending 
story hours, summer programs, and reading group events. This year the 
Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners awarded a federally funded 
Library Services Technology Act grant of $7,500 for Discovery Kits to promote 
children's cultural and language enrichment. Reference Librarian Judy Simons is 
developing programming for adults that includes readings by authors, a film series, 
and a book group. 

The Investment Advisory Committee, chaired by Patience Towie, recommended a 
conservative investment policy and a takeout rate of 4%, which the Board adopted. 
The Friends, chaired by Gail Flynn, continued to enhance our library services by 
providing Museum passes, assisting with receptions, honoring volunteers and staff, 
delivering books to shut-ins, and funding the successful Children's Programs. 

Despite the workload that our successful operation has imposed. Library Director 
Jackie Rafferty and our staff continue to provide an environment that promotes the 
love of reading and the pursuit of knowledge as well as responding to the 
increased technological requirements of our computer. Many thanks to town 
government and our loyal patrons for their support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sarah R. Pease, Chair 
Sheila Evans 
Roger Lowe 
Agnes McCann 
Barbara Power 
Carol Riley 
Patience TowIe 
Stacey Weaver 
Roger Whitley 



191 



REPORT OF PLYMOUTH COUNTY MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 

The Commissioners of the Plymouth County Mosquito Control Project are 
pleased to submit the following report of our activities during 2004. 

The Project is a special district created by the State Legislature in 1957, and 
is now composed of all Plymouth County towns, the City of Brockton, and the 
Town of Cohasset in Norfolk County. The Project is a regional response to a 
regional problem, and provides a way of organizing specialized equipment, 
specially trained employees, and mosquito control professionals into a single 
agency with a broad geographical area of responsibility. 

The 2004 season began with a normal water table until record April 
precipitation produced large numbers of spring and summer brood mosquitoes 
throughout the County. Efforts were directed at larval mosquitoes starting with the 
spring brood. Ground and aerial larviciding was accomplished using B.t.i., an 
environmentally selective bacterial agent. Upon emergence of the spring brood of 
mosquitoes, ultra-low volume adulticiding began. The Project responded to 9,420 
requests for service from residents. 

In response to the elevated threat of virus in the district, we increased our 
trapping, aerial and ground larviciding, and adult spray in areas of concem to 
protect public health. 

Eastern Equine Encephalitis virus was first isolated from Culex species, a 
human-biting species, by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health from 
Project collections in Middleboro on August 3, 2004. Of the season's total of thirty- 
nine EEE isolates, fifteen were from Plymouth County as follows: Halifax (8/4, 
8/11,8/18, 9/13 (2), and 9/20), Kingston (8/18, and 8/19), Middleboro (8/3, 8/24 
and 8/25), Pembroke (8/31 and 9/8), Plymouth (9/8), Rockland (9/4). Four human 
cases of EEE were confirmed, including two fatalities (Brockton and Holbrook). 
These cases came from four towns in two counties (Plymouth County: Brockton 
and Middleboro), (Norfolk County: Holbrook and Foxboro). Seven horses tested 
positive for EEE in Massachusetts, with three in Plymouth County: Middleboro (2) 
9/2 and 9/1 5 and East Bridgewater (1)1 0/2. We normally end our spray season 
on Labor Day. This year, because of increased virus isolations, we extended our 
residential spray program three weeks into September. Municipality-based 
requests for area-wide spray continued throughout the district through 
October 4, 2004. Based on guidelines defined by the "Vector Control Plan to 
Prevent EEE" in Massachusetts, Southeastern Massachusetts will be at a "high 
level of EEE risk" beginning in the 2005 season. 

We are pleased to report that in 2004 there were no human West Nile Virus 
cases in Plymouth County. No horse cases occurred during the season and two 
birds tested positive for WNV(one in East Bridgewater and one in Marshfield). The 
recurring problem of EEE and WNV continues to ensure cooperation between this 
Project and the Department of Public Health. In an effort to keep the public 
informed, EEE and WNV activity updates are regularly posted on our web site, 
www.plvmouthmosquito.com and Massachusetts Department of Public Heath at 
www, state, ma. us/dDh/wnv/wnv1 . htm . 



192 



The figures specific to the Town of Cohasset are given below. While 
mosquitoes do not respect town lines, the information given below does provide a 
tally of the activities which have had the greatest impact on the health and comfort 
of Cohasset residents. 

Insecticide Application. 2,1 12 acres were treated using truck-mounted 
sprayers for control of adult mosquitoes. More than one application was made to 
the same site if mosquitoes reinvaded the area. The first treatments were made in 
June and the last in September. 

Our greatest effort has been targeted at mosquitoes in the larval stage, 
which can be found in woodland pools, swamps, marshes and other standing 
water areas. Inspectors continually gather data on these sites and treat with highly 
specific larvicides when immature mosquitoes are present. 

Water Management. During 2004 crews removed blockages, brush, and 
other obstructions from 1 ,860 linear feet of ditches and streams to prevent 
overflows or stagnation that can result in mosquito breeding. This work, together 
with machine reclamation, is most often carried out in the fall and winter. 

Finally, we have been tracking response time, which is the time between 
notice of a mosquito problem and response by one of our inspectors. The 
complaint response time in the Town of Cohasset was less than two days, with 
more than 106 complaints answered. 

Mosquito Survey. A systematic sampling for the mosquitoes in Cohasset 
indicates that Aedes vexans was the most abundant species. Other important 
species collected include Uranotaenia sapphirina and Coquillettidia perturbans. 

We encourage citizens or municipal officials to call our office for information 
about mosquitoes, mosquito-borne diseases, control practices, or any other 
matters of concem. 

Raymond D. Zucker 
Superintendent 

Commissioners: 

Carolyn Brennan, Chairman 

Michael J. Pieroni, Vice-Chairman 

Leighton F. Peck, Secretary 

William J. Mara 

Kenneth W. Ludlam, Ph.D. 



193 



REPORT OF THE RECREATION COMMISSION 

It gives us great pleasure to report to residents the activities of their Recreation 
Commission for 2004. 

During the year, approximately 4,350 individuals of all ages participated in a variety 
of structured programs, activities, and events. While budget restrictions persist, 
our latitude of use of the Revolving Account Fund for 100% Self-Supporting 
Programs are continuing under this financial mechanism, causing no impact upon 
taxpayers. In fact, via the Recreation Commission's policy to charge an 
Administrative Service Fee charge to all R.A.F. sponsored programs, taxpayers 
are reimbursed for the cost of the recreation budget. That is, revenues produced 
via Administrative Service Fees, coupled with budget-sponsored program fees, 
service fees, and charges helps reimburse taxpayers for the budget of their 
Recreation Commission. Only revenue on deposit in the General Fund can be 
considered recapitalization revenue. 

During Fiscal Year 2004, ending June 30, 2004, the Recreation Commission 
produced for the General Fund $81 ,866.75. $8,550.00 was produced, for use by 
the Commission via grants and matching grant funds. Concurrently, $29,622.21 
was transacted via Revolving Account Funds for 100% Self-Supporting programs, 
via fees charged participants for a variety of services. Approximately another 
$300,000.00 was transacted via other and direct self-supporting financial systems 
during F.Y. 2004, manifesting a collective $420,038.96 of recreational services to 
residents. These figures do not include the thousands of man-hours that are 
annually donated by hundreds of residents, in support of a variety of program 
operations. 

Due to the financial difficulties town government faces during Fiscal Year 
2005/2006, the Recreation Commission aims to become 75% to 100% self- 
supporting via revenue dedicated to the General Fund of the town only. Via fee 
charges and administrative service fees to contractors to the Commission, our 
intent will be to recapitulate about $100,000.00 to $120,000.00 back to taxpayers. 
It is our intent to do this with as little financial impact upon users of our services as 
possible. 

Municipal recreation is for the benefit of all residents, and we continue to direct our 
efforts towards assurance of equal access and opportunity to the entire 
community. To this end, a specific and calculated portion of revenue was not 
collected this year from residents who were temporarily unable to pay full fee 
charges for services. In many instances time was volunteered in lieu of full fee 
payments, benefiting the department and participants of programs. 

Programming represents only one aspect of the responsibilities, duties, and 
functions as prescribed and conferred upon the recreation commission by both 



194 



Massachusetts General Laws and bylaws of the Town. Continuing efforts are 
focused upon upgrading and renovating existing outdoor recreational facilities 
under jurisdiction of the commission. Oftentimes these undertal^ings are 
coordinated via a blend of both public and privately solicited resources and efforts, 
easing taxpayers' burden. 

Numerous town departments and officials have continued to support our effort in 
this area, for which we remain enormously grateful. Further, we remain indebted 
to many private and civic groups for their magnanimous efforts and resources. Via 
the efforts of the Cohasset Basketball Boosters Club and Cohasset Soccer Club, 
the community is well served beyond the operations of sports programs only. 

The seven-member elected board of Recreation Commissioners volunteer their 
services to the town and department, meeting regularly in order to discuss a wide- 
spectrum of topics relative to the leisure needs and pursuits of all residents. 
Further, the Commissioners establish policy and provide departmental direction, 
support, and assistance. Each meeting is publicly posted at least one week prior 
to date and residents are cordially invited to attend and participate in any meeting. 
Essential to our proper function, and absolutely vital towards success, is the ability 
to remain responsive to dynamic community needs. We consider your input and 
feedback our most important source of guidance. 

Degree of community interest and support for recreational and leisure-time 
services can directly be measured by two essential factors. First and most 
logically, interest is measured by the level of participation by residents in various 
services. Secondly and perhaps as important, interest and support is readily 
recognizable by the extraordinary numbers of volunteers who donate their time, 
effort, and expertise to a number of our programs, events, and activities. 

The Recreation Commission wishes to acknowledge gratitude to the many 
individuals, civic and business organizations, school and sports groups, town 
boards, committees, and departments who have lent their support and assistance 
in our efforts to best serve the recreational and leisure needs of residents of all 
ages. While too numerous to mention each name, none are forgotten and all are 
sincerely appreciated and thanked. 



Respectfully yours, 

Richard P. Barrow, Chairman 

James H. Richardson, Vice-Chairman 

Anthony J. Carbone 

Lillian M. Curley 

Mary K. Muncey, Secretary 

Wallace B. St.John 

John M. Wortey, Director 



195 



YOUTH RESOURCES RECREATION COMMISSION 

It is with distinct pleasure that the Recreation Commission submits their Annual 
Report to the residents of Cohasset as we enter our 5*^ year of operations at the 
Teen Garage. 

The Garage continues to serve our teen population in grades 6-12, offering a safe, 
supervised facility designed to help meet the recreational and social needs of this 
age group. 

It has become encumbent upon us to ensure that the Garage operates on a 
financially self-supporting basis each fiscal year, starting Fiscal Year 2004, (July 1 , 
2003). 

While open weekends for drop-in use by youngsters, the Garage also offers 
frequent dances and other special activities. The Garage also remains available for 
rental by residents for private parties or functions. 

Small per capita fee charges to participants for dances and special events, 
coupled with the generosity of residents and civic organizations, enable the 
Garage to operate financially. Special thanks goes to the South Shore Playhouse 
Associates for their continued generosity, support, and interest. 

Our costs are the usual utility, telephone, supplies, games, etc., along with staff 
payroll. We try to upgrade electronic games and equipment, along with other 
games, and as often as possible within our limited revenue/income. Essentially, 
our monthly costs of operation and staffing run about $1 ,200.00, without any 
purchases of new equipment or supplies. 

However, via the continued support and generosity of residents, civic and business 
organizations, and per capita fee charges to the youngsters, we feel this deficit can 
be accommodated. Anyone wishing to help with this endeavor can find self- 
addressed envelopes just outside the Recreation Department office, in the foyer of 
Town Hall. 

The youth of Cohasset and members of the Recreation Commission wish to 
extend their most sincere gratitude to the numerous residents, business 
organizations, town boards, officials, and departments who have generously 
donated money, time, effort, materials, and supplies on behalf of our youngsters. 

Respectfully yours, 

Richard P. Barrow, Chairman Mary K. Muncey, Secretary 

James H. Richardson, Vice-Chairman Wallace B. St.John 

Anthony J. Carbone John M. Worley, Director 
Lillian M. Curley 



196 



GOVERNMENT ISLAND ADVISORY COMMITTEE ANNUAL REPORT 

The Island's 58* birthday - 2004. The Town, through the Board of Selectmen, 
bought the Island - 7.4 acres - from the U.S. Government for $29,000.00, or about 
$3,900.00 per acre - as I've said before, "Not a bad deal." The area consists of 
ledge, woods, shoreline, and, of course, graded and seeded areas to be used by 
the fishermen, sailing club members, townspeople (You), and visitors to Cohasset. 

The GIAC oversees these 7.4 acres for the Town. We are an interested group of 
seven volunteers who make recommendations to the Board of Selectmen for 
action to be taken. The Board of Selectmen will, if necessary, go to Town Meeting 
for action by the voters - YOU. 

Our activities throughout the year call for sporadic meetings to discuss/solve a 
current question or problem. This meeting schedule may change to either a 
monthly or bi-monthly meeting. 

During the past two years the committee has lost two valuable members who were 
very active with different responsibilities around the harbor: Mr. John H. Winters 
III, Harbormaster, and Mr. Robert M. Davenport, a very valuable member of the 
GIAC. 

Mr. Winters watched over the harbor and the Island. He would contact the 
committee as questions arose. He was an invaluable member. 

Mr. Robert M. Davenport, a local resident of Back Horse Lane, was a very active 
sailor who realized the value of Government Island as a connection between the 
Town and the ocean. He was constantly seeing things that should be done to 
keep the Island as neat and presentable as possible for the residents and visitors. 
He will be greatly missed 

The normal maintenance of the island goes on with good cooperation between 
Carl Sestito, DPW Superintendent, his crew, and the GIAC. 

Please, as we have said many times, take some time to visit the area with your 
family. Enjoy it, absorb it, and drink in some history that is right here in your harbor 
- in your backyard. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Hamilton T. Tewksbury, Chairman 
Constance M. Afshar 
Richard P. Barrow 
Noel A. Ripley 



Peter G. Whitman 

John D. Muncey, Harbor Master 



197 



SOUTH SHORE REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

COHASSET TOWN REPORT 



As the heading might suggest, the South Shore Regional School District 
optimistically reports on a very positive year completed and looks forv\/ard equally 
to better times yet to come. Two plus years of budget cuts and restrictions, 
experienced not only by school districts but also by nearly all phases of municipal 
operation, might be viewed as a completely negative scenario, but not at South 
Shore Vo-Tech. While the loss of instructional and support positions, cuts to 
supplies and critically important equipment budgets, and the scaling back of sports 
and student activity positions have certainly had an impact, the school district feels 
it has weathered the storm as best as could be expected and anticipates future 
successes and even better delivery of educational services to the students and 
communities it serves. 

School year 2004-2005 has opened with the largest enrollment to date at South 
Shore. Continued popularity and heightened interest in career and technical 
education opportunities in general, combined with a local awareness of the many 
avenues to success available via South Shore, has resulted in a candidate pool of 
applications which could never have been anticipated over forty years ago at the 
school's inception. Virtually the entire Class of 2008 is made up of students 
residing within the eight-town district, with over one hundred given waiting list 
status, mostly students from communities outside the district's membership. 

Headlining the many potential reasons for the upswing in interest by students and 
parents is South Shore's commitment to academic preparedness along with the 
dynamic advantage gained through instruction in one of the school's fourteen 
vocational technical pathways. Continued outstanding performance in the state's 
MCAS assessment program includes one hundred (100%) percent of South 
Shore's Class of 2005 having reached the mandated competency determination 
criteria necessary for graduation. Members of the Class of 2006 have done nearly 
as well, with remediation efforts by the school and staff preparing those who have 
not yet achieved the required thresholds through the standard retesting process. 
In addition, over a dozen seniors qualified for the Commonwealth's first John and 
Abigail Adams scholarship, providing for four years of free tuition to any UMASS 
campus, state or community college. This merit-based award reflects positively on 
both these students and the school. 

Heightened focus is being placed on all Massachusetts public school students 
demonstrating even more challenging levels of achievement in upcoming years, 
with the target of proficiency in all areas raising the testing bar higher. South 



198 



Shore is well into the planning stages aimed at providing broader academic 
instruction in Science and Social Studies, the next content areas coming on board 
for MCAS inclusion. Shifting and adding instructional staffing resources will most 
definitely trigger some financial realities in future district budgets. 

Spring of 2004 also produced South Shore's much anticipated New England 
Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC) report. While the school and district 
did extremely well, realizing a continuation of accreditation with many 
commendations, there are, of course, multiple recommendations that are not only 
valid but also worthy of strong consideration. The administration and the school 
committee will be devoting energy and available resources, hopefully in the near 
future, to addressing some of the recommendations that carry financial impacts. 

South Shore Viking athletics had another history-making calendar year, led by the 
MIAA tournament qualifying basketball teams for both the boys and girls squads. 
The girl's team, with several underclassmen contributors, accomplished the first 
state tournament victory in the school's history. The football team followed up its 
two Super Bowl winning seasons with another successful campaign, finishing 9-3 
and winning the first ever State Vocational Small Schools Championship, defeating 
Blackstone Valley Tech of Upton. 

On the technical front, Vo-Tech has experienced a two-year phase out of the 
Industrial Technology (Manufacturing) program in favor of a Computer Information 
Technology concept aimed at meeting the growing career interests in the computer 
industry. Also meeting a demand, this time on the Department of Education front, 
South Shore has expanded to a full half-year the freshman Exploratory experience, 
providing incoming students an even broader experiential foundation from which to 
make longer-term technical field decisions. 

Currently, 8 of the total enrollment of 572 are from Cohasset. June of 2004 
celebrated the graduation of the following students from the town: Michael Geddes, 
Kristen James, and Kenn Silvia. 

South Shore Vocational Technical High School strives to continue its strong 
regional educational partnership with our area town communities. We look forward 
to serving the needs of the communities whenever possible and to providing the 
best possible career and technical education to our students, your citizens. When 
all constituencies work together, the outcomes are reflected in an improved 
product for all. 

Respectfully submitted, 

David M. Kneeland 

Cohasset Representative, South Shore Regional School District Committee 



199 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE COHASSET MIDDLE-HIGH SCHOOL 

Submitted by John DeLorenzo, Principal 

The completion of the construction project and the welcoming of grade 6 students 
and staff highlighted the beginning of the year at the Middle-High School. 

The students and staff want to thank the taxpayers of Cohasset for our beautiful 
new facility. It is a pleasure to hear the compliments we receive from visiting 
schools. The library/media center, classrooms, computer rooms, computer 
technology, office space, gymnasium, locker rooms, and auditorium all present the 
best about Cohasset. 

The population at the Middle-High School continues to grow. In the Middle School 
there are currently 380 students, while the High School has 387 on its roster. In 
the fall of 2005, those numbers will again increase, with 389 in the Middle School 
and 428 at the High School. 

Our students continue to distinguish themselves academically. Our SAT scores 
have increased by 65 points in verbal and 82 points in math since the 
implementation of the block schedule. We proudly share Governor Romney's 
announcement that 20 of our seniors were recipients of John and Abigail Adams 
Scholarships; that's 25% of our current senior class. This recognition is based on 
student MCAS results. 

As we look forward to the 2005-2006 school year, we are proposing the expansion 
of elective offerings at the high school, adding another year of US History and 
offering Advanced Placement courses in Statistics and Computer Science. 

Our students continue to participate in a number of our extra-curricular activities: 
athletics, band, chorus, drama, student council, and community service. Even 
though we remain the smallest school in the conference, due to hard work and 
commitment our athletic teams continue to excel. 

The recently completed Strategic Planning sessions, which included 
representatives from all of the various town committees, enabled us to establish 
significant goals for the future. We also outlined our vision statement for all the 
schools: 

The Cohasset Middle-High School is committed to excellence in education. 
We hold high expectations for all students and staff, and provide the support 
and resources that enable all to meet or surpass those expectations. Parents, 
staff, and community members take pride in the academically challenging, safe, 
respectful, and student-centered learning environment they have partnered 
together to create. 



200 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEER HILL SCHOOL 

Submitted by Keith Gauley, Principal 

Deer Hill School enjoyed its first full year as a grade three, four, and five 
elementary school following the completed renovations and reconfiguration of the 
schools for the 2004-2005 school year. The completed construction provides 
twenty grade-level classrooms, three additional special education classrooms, two 
computer labs, and devoted space for music, art, physical education, and 
technology instruction. In addition, the renovated Deer Hill School provides access 
to a full-size gymnasium for the students and community, a brand-new library, a 
newly renovated kitchen/cafeteria, and adequate space for the office staff and 
nurse. 

October 1 , 2004 enrollment data reported 369 students at Deer Hill School. 
Average class sizes ranged from 19 students in grade three to 25 students in 
grade four and 22 students in grade five. Staff at Deer Hill School consisted of 
seventeen classroom teachers, three special education teachers, a full-time 
principal and secretary, and specialist teachers for music, art, physical education, 
technology, and health. In addition, staff included a nurse, school psychologist, 
adjustment counselor, library aide, and instructional aides / activity aides. Some 
staff members were shared with the Osgood School and with the Middle-High 
School. 

Students at Deer Hill are instructed in the four main content areas of English 
language arts, mathematics, science, and social science. Students also receive 
instruction in art, music, technology, health, and physical education. In alignment 
with the Education Reform Act of 1993, curriculum is based upon the curriculum 
framework for each content area, and student acquisition of the learning standards 
from the frameworks is assessed through the MCAS (Massachusetts 
Comprehensive Assessment System). 

MCAS scores for Deer Hill students continue to be well above the state 
average, with 2004 scores reporting 79% of the grade three students as proficient 
in reading, 75% of the grade four students proficient or advanced in English 
language arts, 57% of the grade four students proficient or advanced in 
mathematics, and 74% of the grade five students proficient or advanced in 
science, technology, & engineering. 

As we move forward under the leadership of the Cohasset School 
Committee, Dr. Denise Walsh, superintendent, and Keith Gauley, principal of Deer 
Hill School, our goals are many. As outlined in the Strategic Plan developed in 
2004, these goals include improved communication among parents, community, 
staff, and town government along with setting and articulating high expectations for 
all students and staff as we work to increase the number of students who score in 
the proficient and advanced categories on MCAS. Furthermore, our goals at Deer 
Hill School continue to include providing a safe, respectful, and positive learning 
environment, and developing and implementing a plan to meet the present and 
future needs of Cohasset students. We will strive to achieve these goals and to 
maintain the renovated facilities for the benefit of students and the community for 
many years to come. 



201 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE JOSEPH OSGOOD SCHOOL 

Submitted by Janet Sheehan, Principal 



Tlie Osgood School Community spent much of the year preparing for the 
district reorganization and grade reconfiguration, which took effect upon 
completion of the school renovation projects. A task force made up of parents, 
teachers, administrators, and community members prepared for transitions to 
ensure a smooth opening in September of 2004. The Osgood School welcomed 
362 children in kindergarten, first, and second grades. Also welcomed were an 
additional 36 children attending the South Shore Educational Collaborative 
preschool that shares facilities with the Osgood. 

Building facilities were available to numerous community groups and 
organizations throughout the year. In addition to Parent School Organization (PSO) 
events. Parent Advisory Council (PAC) meetings. Orientation and Open House 
evenings for parents, after-school programs using the facilities included the 
Cohasset Enrichment Programs, Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, South Shore Community 
Center French and Spanish Programs, and Cohasset Recreation. During the 
winter months, basketball programs used the gymnasium nightly during weekdays 
and on Saturdays. During the summer months, there were more than 300 children 
enrolled in a variety of programs at the Osgood. 

The School Council developed a School Improvement Plan that guided 
curriculum and included goals for improving teacher and student performance. One 
of many goals was to conduct a feasibility study to consider the implementation of 
a full-day kindergarten program in the district. Parent surveys provided data that 
indicated strong support for offering full-day kindergarten as a choice for families. 
Other school improvement goals accomplished included developing a new 
homework policy based on current research and input from parent and teacher 
sun/eys. 

Faculty and staff during this past year focused on implementing Individual 
Curriculum Accommodation Plans to offer additional support to students in regular 
education. Paraprofessionals were offered training to support students in special 
education as well as regular education. The kindergarten team planned activities to 
improve transitions for preschoolers entering kindergarten. 

Professional Development for teachers at the Osgood School focused on 
reviewing student work in collaborative teams to maintain consistent, high 
standards for student performance. Other Professional Development focused on 
integrating technology in the curriculum. The Osgood Character Education 
Committee assisted in meeting goals for implementing the Second Step Character 
Education Program and the School Council and Parent School Organization 
worked together to meet communication goals. 

Community outreach is always important to us at the Osgood School. 
Senior Citizens were invited to the Osgood for a Read Aloud Day and delighted 
students with their stories. Osgood students enjoyed interacting with the seniors 
again on Make A Difference Day, when children and their families helped around 
town, offering yard clean-up services to seniors. 



202 



A commitment to excellence and a wonderful spirit of community combined 
to make this a successful year. The Strategic Planning Team has developed a five- 
year plan under the leadership of our new Superintendent, Dr. Denise Walsh. The 
Osgood School looks forward to "Continuing the Commitment to Excellence", as 
stated in our Mission. Initiatives to improve teaching and learning will include 
proposals for the following: full-day kindergarten, public preschool, the adoption of 
a comprehensive literacy program, and the necessary resources to address the 
"explosion of research" cited in the National Research Council project that 
recognizes the connection between early education and student success in school. 



203 



ANNUAL REPORT TO THE TOWN 
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Dear Friends of the Community, 

It is a great pleasure to submit to you my first Town Report for the Cohasset Public 
Schools. This is a time of change in the school district. It is a time for reviewing 
our commitment to excellence and planning for the future. I am pleased to share 
with you the Cohasset Educational Strategic Plan for the next five years (2004- 
2009). The purpose of the plan is to provide focus and to establish priorities for 
improving our educational system. 

This strategic plan is the result of the commitment of many dedicated community 
leaders. During an intense two-day seminar, 18 community members from a 
variety of backgrounds gathered to review and to assess relevant information, 
trends, developments, and events to design a plan that includes the mission, 
goals, and vision for the district. 

Action Planning Teams are now in the process of developing recommendations, 
and we would appreciate your support and input. By working together, we can 
ensure that our students will achieve their full potential and become responsible 
members of society. 

Goals: 

1. To improve communication among parents, community, staff, and town 
government. 

2. To set and articulate high expectations for all students and staff. 

3. To provide a safe, respectful and positive learning environment for students, 
staff, and the community. 

4. To develop and implement a plan to meet present and future needs of 
Cohasset's student population. 

Parents, staff, and community members should take pride in the academically 
challenging, safe, respectful, and student-continued learning environment they 
have partnered together to create. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Denise M. Walsh, Ed.D. 
Superintendent of Schools 



204 



The following building reports were compiled by building principals. 



Demise M. Walsh, Ed.D. 
Superintendent of Schools 



Cohasset Public Schools 
October 1, 2004 

Joseph Osgood School 

Only students in physical attendance since school began should be 
reported. 





Total 


Bovs 


Girls 


Total Enrolled 


Octl. 


2003 


2004 


















+ or- 


KAM 


60 


32 


28 


60 










KPM 


67 


36 


31 


67 




114 




+13 


Grade 1 


123 


71 


52 


123 




110 




+13 


Grade 2 
TOTAL 


115 
365 


60 


55 


115 
365 




115 
339 




M) 
+26 










Deer Hill School 









Only students in physical attendance since school began should be 
reported. 





Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total Enrolled 


Oct 1.2003 2004 
+ or- 


Grade 3 


115 


65 


50 


115 


124 (-9) 


Grade 4 


124 


66 


58 


124 


129 (-5) 


Grade 5 


129 


61 


68 


129 


121 +8 



TOTAL 



368 



368 



374 



(-6) 



205 



Cohasset Middle School 

Only students in physical attendance since school began should be 
reported. 





Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total Enrolled 


Oct 1.2003 


2004 
+ or- 


Grade 6 


122 


61 


61 


122 


137 


(-15) 


Grade 7 


137 


71 


66 


137 


112 


+25 


Grade 8 


121 


61 


60 


121 


101 


+20 


TOTAL 


380 






380 


350 


+30 



Cohasset High School 

Only students in physical attendance since school began should be 
reported. 



Total Boys Girls Total Enrolled 

Grade 9 93 52 41 93 

Grade 10 111 60 51 111 

Grade 11 102 47 55 102 



Grade 12 
TOTAL 



81 43 



387 



38 



District Total: 



81 
387 



1500 



Oct1, 


2003 2004 


115 


+ or- 
(-22) 


99 


+12 


81 


+21 


87 
382 


f-6) 
+5 




2004 
+ or- 



1445 



+55 



206 



INDEX 

In Memoriam 3 

Elected Officials 4-13 

Appointed Official 14-15 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Registrars, Board of 6 

Selectmen, Board of 17-19 

Town Counsel 20-21 

Town Moderator 22-23 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 24-26 

Town Clerk's Report 27 

Presidential Primary, March 2, 2004 28-31 

Index, Annual Town Meeting, March 27, 2004 32 

Annual Town Meeting, March 27, 2004 33-72 

Annual Town Election, April 3, 2004 72-74 

State Primary, September 14, 2004 75-77 

State Election, November 2, 2004 77-80 

Index, Special Town Meeting, Decembers, 2004 81 

Special Town Meting, December 6, 2004 82-96 

Vital Statistics 97-104 

Prospective Juror List 105 

FINANCIAL REPORTS 

Accountant 106-138 

Collector 139 

Treasurer 140-141 

Assessors, Board of 142 

HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES 

Health, Board of 143-144 

Council on Elder Affairs 145-149 

Cohasset Housing Authority 150-152 

LAND USE CONTROL 

Building Department 153 

Planning Board 154-155 

Conservation Commission 1 56 

Open Space Committee 157 

Recycling Committee 158-161 



207 



PUBLIC SAFETY 

Fire Department 162-163 

Police Department 164-165 

Emergency Dispatch Center 166 

Emergency Preparedness Committee 1 67-1 68 

PUBLIC WORKS 

Public Works, Department of 169-170 

Water Commission 171-183 

Water Resource Protection 1 84-1 85 

Sewer Commission 186-187 

GENERAL SERVICES 

Historical Commission 188 

Committee on Town History 189-190 

Paul Pratt Memorial Library 191 

Mosquito Control Project 192-193 

RECREATION 

Recreation Commission 194-195 

Yo uth Resou rces Com mittee 196 

Government Island Advisory Committee 197 



EDUCATION 

South Shore Regional Vocational 198-199 

School Committee and Superintendent of Schools 200-206 



208